Brian Grimmett

Senator Orrin Hatch won the GOP Primary Tuesday night, defeating former state senator Dan Liljenquist with more than 60 percent of the vote after a campaign stoked by anti-incumbent sentiment. Hatch told supporters at his election night gathering that he was relieved that the primary is behind him.

"You know I’ve learned that you can’t take anything for granted. No matter how good you are, no matter how much you’ve done. There’s always going to be somebody who's going to find fault with you and I think that’s kind of good in some ways," Hatch said.

Utahns head to the polls for state primary elections, local and state political and civic leaders react to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Arizona's immigration law, and multiple fires continue to burn throughout the state.

The Tea Party revolution swept through Utah in 2010, when conservative favorite Mike Lee ousted three-term Republican Sen. Bob Bennett at the state party convention.

Perhaps the person watching the upset closest that day was Utah's longest-serving senator, Orrin Hatch. Now 78, Hatch is trying to keep his job in an anti-incumbent atmosphere that led to the defeat last month of his colleague Richard Lugar of Indiana.

Utah’s revenue projections appear to be on target, the Department of Corrections is worried about overcrowding, and Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Peter Cooke calls for ethics reform. That and more on today's News Pod.

Andrea Smardon

States are awaiting a decision from the US Supreme Court on provisions of the Affordable Care Act,which will require all Americans to purchase health insurance or face a fine.  But Utah’s Republican Senator Orrin Hatch is vowing to repeal the law, regardless of the court’s decision.   Hatch and Wyoming Senator John Barrasso spoke at a meeting of the Salt Lake Chamber’s Health Reform Task Force Wednesday morning.