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Utah's National Parks Will Stay Open If Government Shuts Down

Utah’s National Parks won’t close, even if a government shutdown begins at midnight tonight. The park staff won’t be working, but the gates will be open.

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Dr. Ruth Watkins has been named the new president of the University of Utah. Watkins has been serving as the Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and will be the university’s first female president in its 168-year history.

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All eyes in the film industry are on Sundance this year.

Erik Neumann / KUER

Intermountain Healthcare is getting into the drug-making business. That announcement came from representatives today who said they’ll partner with four other healthcare systems on a plan to start manufacturing low-cost, generic medications. 

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This month marked the halfway point in Jackie Biskupski’s term as Mayor of Salt Lake City. Although she’s had some challenges and stumbles in her first two years, Utah's first openly-gay mayor is proud of what she’s accomplished so far.

KUER

Last November, Christine Durham retired from Utah’s Supreme Court.  She was our state’s first female Supreme Court Justice.  She joined Doug Fabrizio on RadioWest, and we’ve excerpted part of their conversation about her judicial philosophy, gender discrimination and her legacy.

Original Story: http://radiowest.kuer.org/post/conversation-christine-durham

Julia Ritchey / KUER

State lawmakers are grappling with ways to deal with a glut of bill requests just days before the start of the 2018 legislative session.

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Dieter F. Uchtdorf’s release from the First Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints seems to be getting much of the focus of conversation from members and non-members.

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The Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, provides low-cost health coverage for around 20,000 kids in Utah each year. Senator Orrin Hatch helped create it in 1997 with Democratic Senator Edward Kennedy. It covers children in families that make too much money to qualify for Medicaid but who can’t afford private health insurance. This past September, federal funding for CHIP expired and Congress still hasn’t reauthorized it. KUER's Erik Neumann recently spoke with Lincoln Nehring, the CEO of Voices for Utah Children, to find out what’s at stake. 

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Dan Chure had just wrapped up a career at Dinosaur National Monument last summer. He’d worked there nearly 40 years.

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Russell M. Nelson announced his call as the new president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints during a live broadcast from the Salt Lake Temple Tuesday. The expected appointment came along with news that Nelson chose Dallin H. Oaks and Henry B. Eyring to join him the First Presidency.

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RadioWest

Salvadorans' Terrible Choice

Friday, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Utah journalist Matthew LaPlante about life and survival in one of the world’s most dangerous place, El Salvador.

45 Days Launch Party - Jan. 25th

Join us at Silicon Slopes to meet KUER reporters, talk to Utah lawmakers and preview the first episode of 45 Days.

Tell us:

What questions do you have about affordable housing in Utah?

Introducing: More To Say

KUER

Last November, Christine Durham retired from Utah’s Supreme Court.  She was our state’s first female Supreme Court Justice.  She joined Doug Fabrizio on RadioWest, and we’ve excerpted part of their conversation about her judicial philosophy, gender discrimination and her legacy.

Original Story: http://radiowest.kuer.org/post/conversation-christine-durham

Click here for more from "More To Say"

Put on your NPR socks and join KUER in Washington D.C. for the news junkie tour of a lifetime!

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Discover a new podcast with KUER's staff picks.

NPR News

Updated at 1:28 a.m. ET

The federal government is now in a partial shutdown after Congress failed to pass a stopgap measure to keep funding going ahead of a midnight deadline.

It's an unprecedented situation given that shutdowns usually happen in times of divided government. But this is the first time it's happened with one party controlling both Congress and the White House.

It's been quite a news week, even by recent standards.

The U.S. is potentially hours away from a partial government shutdown. The debate rages on over the president's reported comments about not wanting to accept immigrants from "s**thole countries." "Girtherism" has erupted over the president's latest height and weight measurements. Officials are scrambling to figure out how to avoid another false ballistic missile alarm, like the one residents of Hawaii suffered last weekend.

The Hotel California was, according to a case filed against it by legendary rock band The Eagles, living it up a little too much. The rock band sued the Mexico-based hotel, which shares a name with the band's iconic 1976 song, resulting in a settlement Thursday. The settlement's terms were not disclosed.

Jurors in eastern Canada on Friday found three men not guilty of criminal negligence following an oil train disaster that left 47 people dead. The accident in July 2013 involved a U.S.-owned train carrying North Dakota crude oil. In the aftermath, regulators in the U.S. and Canada adopted sweeping reforms to the way railroads haul and manage hazardous cargoes.

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