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Utah Senators Consider Obamacare Replacement, But Time Is Running Out

Utah’s senators could have one more chance to vote on a proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, but time is running out.

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Lee Hale

Jail records show few arrests in the Rio Grande neighborhood have been for violent, high-level offenses.

Whittney Evans

This week, people who were arrested during Operation Rio Grande went before a judge and asked for help. By agreeing to avoid drugs and alcohol, get treatment and check in once a week, they were offered a spot in Salt Lake County’s new drug court.

Nicole Nixon / KUER

An exhibit featured at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art shows that while many Muslim women wear headscarves, they choose to do so for a variety of reasons.

@GovHerbert / Twitter

It's the end of an era in local TV news. 

Erik Neumann

The Veteran’s Administration, or VA, is in charge of getting benefits like healthcare and disability compensation to Utah’s former service members. But for veterans from past wars, it can be hard to navigate the system. One local program is meant to help veterans but it may soon disappear.

KUED

Gov. Gary Herbert covered a range of topics at his monthly press conference on KUED Thursday, including health care, the national monument review and special legislative sessions.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

West Jordan City Council has passed a resolution urging the state to stiffen penalties for those who commit hate crimes.

Nicole Nixon

Across the street from the Salt Palace Convention Center, Ed Primosic is pretty much over the Outdoor Retailer shows. He and his wife Kris own the Blue Iguana Mexican restaurant.

CSPAN screenshot

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-UT, says it’s “high time” to allow research into the medical benefits of marijuana.

BCFC via www.istockphoto.com

Salt Lake County’s new specialty drug court will operate the same as existing drug courts. What makes the new court different is the population it serves.

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RadioWest

Playing Indian at the Wellsville Sham Battle

The citizens of Wellsville, Utah, have long held the “Sham Battle,” with white people dressed as Native Americans attacking Mormons. We’re talking about it and the long history of playing Indian.

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Hurricane Maria is barreling toward the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico as a "potentially catastrophic" Category 5 hurricane, and is forecast to approach those islands tonight and tomorrow.

On the island of Dominica, which was raked by the storm late Monday, the prime minister says that "initial reports are of widespread devastation. So far we have lost all what money can buy and replace."

Sarah Dudas doesn't mind shucking an oyster or a clam in the name of science.

But sit down with her and a plate of oysters on the half-shell or a bucket of steamed Manila clams, and she'll probably point out a bivalve's gonads or remark on its fertility.

There are more nonwhite teachers than there used to be. But the nation's teaching force still doesn't look like America. One former education school dean is out to change that.

New research shows that the number of K-12 teachers who belong to minority groups has doubled since the 1980s, growing at a faster rate than the profession as a whole. But big gaps persist, with around 80 percent of teachers identifying as white.

Another hurricane, another health care horror story.

At least that's how it looked when eight patients died at a nursing home in Hollywood, Florida. The facility lost its air conditioning several days after Hurricane Irma struck.

That event conjured memories of the scores of elderly who died in Louisiana hospitals and nursing homes following Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Mélisande Short-Colomb knew her family had been enslaved. But until recently, she didn't know that they were enslaved, and later sold, by Georgetown University.

She found out about that part of her history when she got a message from a genealogist for the Georgetown Memory Project, which is dedicated to finding the descendents of the 272 people sold by the university in 1838.

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