NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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NPR Story
5:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

O'Brien And Scott Return To Stripped-Down Roots

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Back in 2000, roots country musicians Tim O'Brien and Darrell Scott recorded an album together called "Real Time." It was regarded as a tour de force and fans waited hungrily for their next studio release. For 13 years they've waited with baited breath. The fans can now exhale.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MEMORIES AND MOMENTS")

TIM O'BRIEN AND DARRELL SCOTT: (Singing) I wish that I could hold you when day is done till (unintelligible) through. But all I have to hold onto are these memories and moments.

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NPR Story
5:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

'Size 12' Finds The Right Mix Of Snark And Drama

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Why Resource-Rich Teams Don't Always Win The Game

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And it is time to talk sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: The baseball playoffs are only a couple days away. NPR's Mike Pesca is taking a look at the teams that made it. He has drawn some conclusions I understand connect to the global economy. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello. How are you? Yes, this is true.

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Movie Interviews
3:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Joseph Gordon-Levitt, On Life And The Lenses We Look Through

With Don Jon, the actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who stars as the titular porn-addicted Jersey boy, adds writer and director to his resume.
Relativity Media

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Joseph Gordon-Levitt's movie Don Jon is about a young, simple guy with a few basic passions: his body, his pad, his cars, his family, his church, his girls, and his porn.

That's right: Jon is addicted to pornography. You could say he's managing that addiction pretty well — until he becomes taken with Barbara, played by Scarlett Johansson.

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Television
3:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

The Most Shocking Moments Are True In 'Masters Of Sex'

Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan play famous sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson in a new series, Masters of Sex.
Craig Blankenhorn Showtime

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:53 pm

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Politics
3:43 am
Sun September 29, 2013

House Vote Brings Government To The Verge Of A Shutdown

The lights are on at the Capitol as the House of Representatives works into the night Saturday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Shortly after midnight Sunday morning, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would keep the government's lights on. It would also delay the Affordable Care Act for a year, making the legislation a non-starter for Senate Democrats and the president.

The ball is back in the Senate's court now, with fewer than 40 hours until a government shutdown begins.

The House bill does three things. First, it's a temporary measure to keep government operations funded through the middle of December.

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Sports
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

New NBA Cameras Could Catch Lazy Players

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A little over a year from now, if you walk into any NBA arena, there's a good chance you'll be standing underneath six expensive high tech cameras. You probably won't see these cameras, though. They'll be tucked away up in the rafters, but during the game those six cameras will be tracking the exact location of every player on the court and the ball 25 times a second.

Zach Lowe has been reporting on this phenomenon for the sports website Grantland.com. He joins us now from our studios in New York. Hi Zach.

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Sports
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Extra Wild Card Adds Man-Made Drama To MLB

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's almost October, which means baseball playoff time. So for the uninitiated, let's review how Major League Baseball recently changed who gets to go to the playoffs. As always, the top three spots in each league go to the best teams in the three divisions; best teams from East, West and Central. There's also a fourth slot - the wildcard slot.

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Middle East
5:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Historic Thaw Possible In U.S., Iran Relations

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Movie Interviews
3:37 am
Sun September 22, 2013

'Wadjda' Director: 'It Is Time To Open Up'

Women aren't permitted to travel unattended in the streets of Saudi Arabia, so Wadjda director Haifaa Al Mansour worked from inside a van, communicating with her crew via walkie-talkie.
Tobias Kownatzki Razor Film/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

Wadjda, being touted as the first feature film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia — a country with no movie theaters and a relationship with cinema that's complicated at best — tells the story of a defiant 10-year-old pushing back against the social expectations that define her life as a young Saudi woman.

Wadjda's source of independence comes in the form of a green bicycle she wants to buy for herself. But girls in Saudi Arabia don't ride bicycles, so she has to be creative.

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It's All Politics
3:36 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Obama's Passing Up Chances To Turn On The Charm

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama arrive at last year's congressional picnic on the South Lawn of the White House. This year, the picnic — seen as a chance for lawmakers to socialize beyond party lines — was canceled.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

President Obama isn't known as a schmoozer like Bill Clinton or a back-slapper like George W. Bush. But he does know that a personal touch can woo allies and soften adversaries.

Right now, domestic and international crises are looming on all sides of the president. Although a little tenderness might come in handy, Obama is repeatedly passing up opportunities to wage a charm offensive.

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Asia
9:34 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

Bo Xilai's Life Sentence Reveals China's Leadership Problem

Disgraced politician Bo Xilai stands during his trial on corruption charges in August.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 9:20 am

A court in East China sentenced former top Chinese official Bo Xilai to life in prison for corruption after one of the highest-profile political trials of recent years.

Media coverage of the court hearings transfixed audiences with details of murder, a love triangle and lavish official life styles. The case may prove to be a political Pandora's box that could bring down even higher-ranking officials and widen divisions over the country's future direction.

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Middle East
9:42 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Syria Deal Puts Russia, And Its Influence, In Spotlight

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:36 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Olympics Has A Big Problem

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: NPR's Mike Pesca was in Buenos Aires last week for the International Olympic Committee's big announcement of who will host the 2020 Olympics. It's Tokyo, by the way. While he was there, it really set in for him that the Olympics has a problem. He thinks he knows a way to fix it. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: I just talked to smart, informed people. I didn't really come up with it...

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NPR Story
5:36 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Language You Use Might Save You Money

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The language we speak affects much of how we understand the world and probably in more ways than you think. Keith Chen is a professor of economics at UCLA and he's been studying some examples of this. He's found that the way language is structured can influence our eating habits, our likelihood of smoking, even the way we spend or save our money. Keith Chen, welcome to the program.

KEITH CHEN: Thank you. It's excited to be here.

MARTIN: So, explain how this works.

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NPR Story
5:36 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Traveling By Cargo, With Lots Of Reading Time

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

WEEKEND EDITION's travel segment Winging It aims to bring you advice and ideas about different ways to spend your free time and profiles of people embarking of adventures of all kinds. A few months, ago we introduced you to Rebecca Hall. When we spoke with her, Hall was getting ready to set out on an unusual journey - traveling from Greece to Hong Kong on a cargo ship.

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The Sunday Conversation
3:39 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Compensation Funds For Victims Of Tragedy A 'Small Solace'

Kenneth Feinberg speaks at a press conference on the One Fund, established for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

In so many American tragedies, from the attacks of Sept. 11 to the Boston Marathon bombings, victims who survive and the families of those who don't are offered compensation. And when it comes time to figure out who should be compensated and how much, time and time again, Kenneth Feinberg's phone rings.

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Author Interviews
3:27 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Read The Rainbow: 'Roy G. Biv' Puts New Spin On Color Wheel

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

There are a lot of fascinating details hiding below the surface in the world of color. For instance, scientists once thought the average color of the entire universe was turquoise — until they recalculated and realized it was beige.

In Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights.

And in World War II, the British painted a whole flotilla of warships pinkish-purple so they'd blend in with the sky at dusk and confuse the Germans. That's right — pink warships.

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Television
3:15 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Voice Of Rocky And Natasha Earns An Emmy

Voice actress June Foray will receive the Governor's Award at the Creative Arts Emmys.
Amanda Edwards UCLA/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show featured a fearless flying squirrel and his slow-witted moose sidekick. They did battle with two scheming but incompetent Soviet spies named Boris and Natasha.

The cartoon is an American classic, beloved for a wry sense of humor that appeals to kids and their parents. It originally aired from 1959 until 1964, but has been in syndication ever since, most recently on the Cartoon Network and Boomerang.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Mike Doughty Annuls The 'Dark Marriage' Of His Former Band

Mike Doughty's latest album, Circles Super Bon Bon, revisits songs from his years fronting the band Soul Coughing.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Mike Doughty spent the 1990s as the gravel-voiced frontman for Soul Coughing. Fusing elements of pop, jazz, hip-hop and house music, the band had a sound all its own — but Doughty says he was never satisfied with it.

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NPR Story
4:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

The Mysteries Of Sleep Were Just Too Mysterious

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've been exploring the mystery of sleep this morning - how we're not getting enough of it and why we need it in the first place.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: We asked our listeners to share their sleep troubles.

EMILY MCMAMEE: So, I have always sleptwalked and slept-talked and it's always been amusing for everybody else around me. I learn about it the next morning when people tell me, you know, did you know that you just did this?

MARTIN: Emily McMamee is from Starksboro, Vermont.

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NPR Story
4:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Olympic Committee Picks A New Olympic Sport

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: Yesterday in Buenos Aires, the International Olympic Committee went eenie-meenie-minie-moe and decided which city will host the 2020 Olympics.

JACQUES ROGGE: The Games of the 32nd Olympiad in 2020 are awarded to the city of Tokyo.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

MARTIN: And the crowd goes wild. NPR's Mike Pesca was there. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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NPR Story
4:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Dreams: The Telling Tells More Than The Contents

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So like many people, Billy Crystal can't sleep. And if you're not sleeping you're not dreaming, which could also be problematic.

Psychoanalyst Stephen Grosz says dreams are crucial.

DR. STEPHEN GROSZ: They seem to be a part of what it is to be human, and something which has been a part of human life for as long as we know.

MARTIN: In his book, "The Examined Life," Grosz writes about how dreams often reveal things about his patients that they hide even from themselves.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:40 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Close, But No Cigar

NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:09 pm

On-air challenge: Each of the following answers is a made-up, two-word phrase in which the two words are homophones, and both words start with the letter C.

Last week's challenge from listener Henry Hook of Brooklyn: Think of a well-known celebrity who goes by a single name — the last two letters of which are alphabetically separated by only one letter (like A and C, or B and D). Replace this pair of letters with the one that separates them, and you'll have a common, everyday word. What is it?

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Environment
3:32 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors

A white snowshoe hare against a brown background makes the animal easy prey.
L.S. Mills Research Photo

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

The effects of climate change often happen on a large scale, like drought or a rise in sea level. In the hills outside Missoula, Mont., wildlife biologists are looking at a change to something very small: the snowshoe hare.

Life as snowshoe hare is pretty stressful. For one, almost everything in the forest wants to eat you.

Alex Kumar, a graduate student at the University of Montana, lists the animals that are hungry for hares.

"Lynx, foxes, coyotes, raptors, birds of prey. Interestingly enough, young hares, their main predator is actually red squirrels."

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Author Interviews
1:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

The 'Wild' Story Of Cheryl Strayed And Her Long-Lost Half-Sister

In addition to Wild, Cheryl Strayed is also the author of Torch and Tiny Beautiful Things.
Joni Kabana Courtesy Knopf

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

Back in 1995, Cheryl Strayed hiked 1,100 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail along the West Coast of the United States. After the three-month journey, she came out on the other side stronger in every way: better able to cope with her divorce, her past drug abuse and her mother's death.

Strayed described the life-changing trek in her 2012 bestselling memoir Wild, and received countless emails from readers describing how connected they felt to her story. But there was one message that stood out in particular:

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All Tech Considered
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Out Of The Fields And Into Computer Science Classes

The inaugural class of the Computer Science and Information Technology program, scheduled to graduate in 2016.
Hartnell College

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

To earn money for her family, Alicia Leon Rios worked in the fields in Salinas, Calif. Meanwhile, she sent her toddler, Leticia, to Mexico to be raised by her grandparents.

Even now, Alicia Leon Rios chokes up thinking about that difficult decision more than two decades ago. But it was worth it, she in Spanish, because her daughter "was able to choose another path."

That path led to college.

Fast-Track To A Degree

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Health
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Texas Megachurch At Center Of Measles Outbreak

The Eagle Mountain International Church in Newark, Texas, is linked to at least 21 cases of measles.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:58 pm

Measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. more than a decade ago. But in recent years, the highly infectious disease has cropped up in communities with low vaccination rates, most recently in North Texas.

There, 21 people — the majority of whom have not been immunized — have gotten the disease, which began at a vaccine-skeptical megachurch.

The outbreak began when a man who contracted the virus on a recent trip to Indonesia visited the Eagle Mountain International Church in Newark, about an hour and a half northwest of Dallas.

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World
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Last Flight Of Ethiopia-To-Israel Jewish Migration Program

A boy waves the flag of his new homeland on the last flight of organized, large-scale emigration of Ethiopian Jews to Israel.
Moshik Brin Courtesy of Moshik Brin

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 8:09 am

Last Wednesday, two jetliners flew 450 Ethiopian Jews to Israel.

They were the last to arrive under an official program designed to bring to Israel all remaining Ethiopian Jews who are eligible for citizenship.

At the Tel Aviv airport just before the planes landed, everyone seemed excited. Relatives of people arriving from Ethiopia cheered when the plane doors opened.

Achenef Chekole arrived with his wife, two sons and two daughters. Family and friends who had already immigrated to Israel greeted them with hugs.

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Author Interviews
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

The Private War Of J.D. Salinger

Salinger, seen here at right with his friend Donald Hartog in 1989, was sorry he ever wrote Catcher, says Salinger co-author Shane Salerno.
AP

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

"J.D. Salinger spent 10 years writing The Catcher in the Rye and the rest of his life regretting it," according to a new book about one of America's best-known and most revered writers.

Salinger died three years ago at the age of 91, after publishing four slim books. But Catcher in the Rye has sold more than 65 million copies and has become a touchstone for young people coming of age around the world. It still sells hundreds of thousands of copies every year.

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