NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Europe
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

What's Next For Spain's Bailout Plan?

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Europeans woke up this morning with a couple of big fundamental questions looming over them. Have they saved Spain? And if not, is the eurozone heading for collapse? After weeks of denial, the Spanish government finally admitted what pretty much everyone else already knew: The country's banks need a bailout. The Spanish haven't said how much they need. But eurozone finance ministers had a long conference call yesterday and agreed they'd lend Spain up to $125 billion.

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Sports
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Sports Roundup: A Hot Night For Devils, Heat

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALLGAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

New Farm Bill Has Its Share Of Complications

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

After The Games, It's Time For British Grub

For visitors and athletes from around the world who will be staying in London this summer for the 2012 Olympic Games, they might be wondering what they're going to eat.

Around the Nation
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

What To Expect In The Sandusky Trial

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Digital Life
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Internet Addresses Get More Space With New Protocol

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's a little early in the program for a puzzle, but here's a trivia question for you: How much is an undecillion?

STEPHEN SHANKLAND: The number one followed by 36 zeroes. It's an awfully large number. It's also a trillion trillion trillion.

MARTIN: That's Stephen Shankland of the tech media website C-Net. He's been contemplating those kinds of numbers since the launch this past week of something called IPv6. It's the next generation Internet protocol. Shankland spoke to us via Skype.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

This Changes Everything!

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

On-Air Challenge: Given a sentence, change one letter in one word to make a new word which completely reverses the meaning of the sentence. For example, given "The singer is not coming on stage." Changing the "T" in not to a "W" in the word "not" makes the sentence, "The singer is now coming on stage."

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Books
4:05 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Two Poems From The Nation's New Top Poet

English professor Natasha Trethewey was named the 19th U.S. poet laureate last week.
Jalissa Gray Creative Commons Image

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 4:14 pm

Natasha Trethewey is the newly announced, 19th U.S. poet laureate. The position is described by the Library of Congress as "the nation's official lightning rod for the poetic impulse of Americans."

Trethewey tells Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin that it's a lot of responsibility.

"Just trying to be the biggest promoter of poetry; someone who's really got to do the work of bringing poetry to the widest audience possible," she says.

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Books
4:04 am
Sun June 10, 2012

No One In 'The Red House' Gets Away Unscathed

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 10:50 am

Ah, the family getaway. All of you together in one space — maybe a cabin in the mountains or a beach house. Delightful family meals, maybe some Scrabble. A time of togetherness and familial harmony.

That is decidedly not the kind of family vacation writer Mark Haddon draws inspiration from. In his latest novel, The Red House, Haddon peers inside the messy dynamics of a group of relatives, each grappling with their own fears and trying to make sense of themselves as a family, all while stuck in a vacation house in the remote English countryside.

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Theater
10:03 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Behind The Stars, The Sets That Help Them Shine

The idea behind Ost's design was to keep the set out of the way of the storytelling --€” and of Newsies' kinetic ensemble.
Mike Coppola Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Broadway caps off its 2011-2012 season June 10 at the 66th annual Tony Awards, and while the focus will mostly be on the nominated shows and actors, some attention must be paid to the set designers — the people who help create the environments that let those shows and actors shine.

Take Daniel Ostling: When he read Bruce Norris' script for Clybourne Park, a play that takes place in a very realistic Chicago bungalow, the veteran scenarist quickly came to a realization: "The house is actually a character."

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Asia
7:53 am
Sun June 3, 2012

'Like Our Own Mother': Aung San Suu Kyi In Thailand

Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi waves to Myanmar refugees during her visit to the Mae La refugee camp near the Thai-Myanmar border on Saturday.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 5:36 pm

On her first journey abroad in 24 years, Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi upstaged and dazzled world leaders with her statesmanship and charisma.

Suu Kyi attended an international economic forum in Thailand last week, but Saturday was very different. She visited a camp on the Thai-Myanmar border, where refugees have fled to escape oppression and civil war in her homeland. The visit showed that despite becoming one of the most prominent politicians in Asia, her political situation at home remains a bit precarious.

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Politics
6:03 am
Sun June 3, 2012

The Obama-Clinton Dynamic

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Tomorrow night, President Barack Obama will appear at two glitzy fundraisers in New York. At his side will be former President Bill Clinton, both darlings of the Democrats and both in regular contact with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. A natural partnership between two like-minded political giants, you might think - or is it?

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Economy
6:03 am
Sun June 3, 2012

How Homes Structure The American Dream

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Home ownership has long been considered a key part of the American Dream. The dream has taken a beating in recent years, but polls show the desire to own remains extremely high. NPR's Chris Arnold discusses the state of home ownership and reviews the latest housing news with host Rachel Martin.

Sports
6:03 am
Sun June 3, 2012

Wanna Make A Bet On Horse Racing?

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Host Rachel Martin talks to NPR's Mike Pesca about betting on the Belmont Stakes and boxing.

Economy
6:03 am
Sun June 3, 2012

The Economy From The People's Perspective

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Disappointing. Dismal. Bleak. These are just a few of the words used to describe the latest employment report. It showed that the U.S. economy added just 69,000 jobs in May. That's less than half of what economists had expected. And this was the third consecutive month of weak results, which raises new concerns about the sputtering economic recovery.

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Economy
6:03 am
Sun June 3, 2012

We Got The Jobs Report, Now What?

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Friday's disappointing jobs report added to worries the recovery is in trouble. Only 69,000 new jobs were added to payrolls, and the unemployment rate moved higher, to 8.2 percent. Suddenly there is more talk about the Fed and what it might do to get the economy moving again. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

NPR Story
5:38 am
Sun June 3, 2012

Enthusiasm To Recall Wis. Governor May Be Waning

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

On Tuesday, Wisconsin voters will decide whether Republican Scott Walker becomes just the third governor recalled from office in U.S. history. But as NPR's David Schaper reports, some now wonder whether the intensity of the left has been eclipsed by the resolve of the right.

NPR Story
5:38 am
Sun June 3, 2012

'Dinner': A Ritual Of Love

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 10:05 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Even if you're just finishing your morning cup of coffee, there's a question that you're likely to be asked by your wife or your kids or whoever turns up around 6:00 in the evening. It's harder to answer for some than others. What's for dinner? Jenny Rosenstrach says getting dinner on the table has become a source of major stress.

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NPR Story
5:38 am
Sun June 3, 2012

'Theater' On The Thames Marks Queen's 60 Years

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is indeed a celebration fit for a queen, one who has been on the throne in England for 60 years. Queen Elizabeth II's diamond jubilee celebrations continue today, and NPR's Philip Reeves is following all the festivities.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: Queen Elizabeth arrives at the River Thames to begin her journey; the fanfares and cheers and a steam train in full voice.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRAIN HORN)

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NPR Story
5:38 am
Sun June 3, 2012

Defense Secretary Panetta Visits Vietnam

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is on a week-long trip to Asia, with stops in Singapore, Vietnam and India. As NPR's Larry Abramson tells host Rachel Martin, Panetta's trip highlights the Pentagon's new strategic focus on China and the Pacific.

NPR Story
5:38 am
Sun June 3, 2012

Sports Reporter Stands Out From The Sidelines

Checked suits, bright colors, garish patterns — you name it, and Craig Sager's worn it. This violet outfit accompanied a 2010 playoff game between two teams with purple in their color scheme, the Los Angeles Lakers and the Phoenix Suns.
Christian Petersen Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 12:50 pm

On Saturday night, the NBA semifinals notched yet another thriller as the Oklahoma City Thunder resisted a late push by the San Antonio Spurs. The series is now even at 2-2.

Thunder star Kevin Durant's fourth-quarter heroics were a spectacle — but just as mesmerizing was the man patrolling the sidelines in a pearly white jacket, blue shirt and fire-truck red pants.

That would be Craig Sager, TNT's go-to sideline reporter for NBA games. His outlandish outfits have made him an iconic part of the NBA on TV.

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Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!
4:40 am
Sun June 3, 2012

A Parasite Fit For A Queen

A Lamprey Pie from Pleasant House Bakery in Chicago.
Louisa Chu Flickr/Creative Commons

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 10:02 am

From our "How To Do Everything" podcast:

Among the many gifts Queen Elizabeth II will receive for her Diamond Jubilee is a special lamprey pie from the town of Gloucester. It's a tradition dating back centuries. Lampreys may seem like an odd gift for a monarch, but one person's eel-like parasite which sucks the blood of fish is another person's delicacy.

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Author Interviews
4:21 am
Sun June 3, 2012

One Man's Case For Regulating Hate Speech

Frank Collin, head of the National Socialist Party of America, tells the press about his organization's plans to march in the predominantly Jewish town of Skokie, Ill., on June 22, 1978. The Supreme Court affirmed the neo-Nazi organization's right to march, but Jeremy Waldron says that's just the kind of speech the government should be restricting.
AP

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

Warning: This story contains language that some might find offensive.

In the late '70s, Skokie, Ill., became the epicenter of the debate over free speech in the U.S. The town was home to many Holocaust survivors, along with their families, and that made it a target for the National Socialist Party of America — a neo-Nazi group from nearby Chicago.

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Space
4:20 am
Sun June 3, 2012

Look Up, Stargazers: June 5 Is The Transit Of Venus

To learn more about the Transit of Venus and to get tips for observing this rare astronomical event, visit the NASA website.
Joerg Koch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

It's been a good season for stargazers, a veritable meteor shower of astronomical goodies, from a supermoon to a solar eclipse. Next up? On Tuesday, June 5, astronomy enthusiasts can witness the Transit of Venus — one of the rarest astronomical events.

During the six-hour transit, Venus moves in between the Earth and the sun. It's a daytime phenomenon: "Instead of seeing Venus as the brightest object in the night sky, you see Venus as a tiny black dot crossing the burning disc of the sun," explains Andrea Wulf, author of Chasing Venus.

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Music Interviews
4:20 am
Sun June 3, 2012

Noah Stewart: From 'Opera Boy' To Singer

Noah Stewart's debut album is entitled Noah.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

When tenor Noah Stewart was growing up in Harlem, N.Y., his friends called him "opera boy." They were onto something.

Earlier this year, he became the first black singer to hit No. 1 on the classical music charts in the U.K.

But Stewart's musical tastes aren't confined to Puccini, Bizet and Strauss, and his new, self-titled album gives him a chance to put his mark on everything from American spirituals to Top 40 hits.

Stewart says he doesn't mind being called an opera singer, but that he would rather just be called a singer.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat June 2, 2012

That's Jakarta, With A Capital 'J'

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 8:37 am

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is the name of a world capital. You'll be given clues to its phonetic parts, and you name the capital. For example, given the clues "person from Bangkok" and "salary," the answer would be Taipei ("Thai" plus "pay").

Last Week's Challenge From Listener Jack Lechner: Name two different kinds of wool. Take the first five letters of one, followed by the last three letters of the other, and the result will spell the first and last name of a famous actor. Who is it?

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Commentary
6:55 am
Sun May 27, 2012

A Cook-Out Brings Home To Afghanistan

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, members of the 182nd National Guard are sharing memories of a year spent at war.

SPECIALIST KORY DESMOND: I am Specialist Kory Desmond and some of my memories is of a cookout. When I got to Afghanistan on this little base, it's right on the Pakistan border basically, the eastern part of Afghanistan. Me and couple of guys thought to cook for a cookout. And after our whole summer there in Afghanistan and not being able to have any cookouts, it was a pretty good time.

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Author Interviews
6:55 am
Sun May 27, 2012

'Finding Ultra': The Ultimate Athletic Test

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Commentary
6:55 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Captain Remembers Sept. 11 Ceremony In Kabul

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard as they tell us their most vivid memories of their recent deployment to Afghanistan. In this installment, Capt. Michael Currie remembers a ceremony honoring those who died in the war, both civilian and military.

NPR Story
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

A Soldier's Rush To Share Grandfather's Final Days

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend and as part of our Home Front series, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard. Pfc. Joshua Stein remembers his grandfather, who had a stroke during Stein's deployment.

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