NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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NPR Story
5:22 am
Sun June 24, 2012

'Who I Am': N.Y.C. Council Speaker On Politics, Faith

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene. Americans are growing more and more frustrated with the gridlock in Washington, D.C. In a Gallup poll out this month, only 17 percent of Americans said they approve of the job Congress is doing. Well, Christine Quinn says it does not have to be that way. She is the speaker of the New York City Council, and she's taken heat for seeming too close to the executive branch - that would be New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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NPR Story
5:22 am
Sun June 24, 2012

In Survival Of The Funkiest, Bad Music Dies First

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Human evolution is all about survival of the fittest. Over thousands of generations, the weak have been weeded out, and the strong have survived. But how would that kind of natural selection work in other settings - like, say, music? Well, one biologist decided to find out. He designed a website where listeners can rate collections of notes according to their musicality. The nice sounds survive, and other users listen to them. But the ugly sounds die off.

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Education
4:29 am
Sun June 24, 2012

A Year Without Mexican-American Studies In Tucson

Protesters are seen in June 2011 in support of the Tucson Unified School District's Mexican-American studies program. A new state law effectively ended the program saying it was divisive.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:51 pm

An Arizona law that went into effect last year essentially ruled that the Mexican-American studies program offered in the Tucson public school system was divisive and should be scrapped. At the end of the first semester without the classes, hard feelings still linger.

For eight years, until this past January, Lorenzo Lopez taught Mexican-American studies at Cholla High in Tucson, Ariz., the very school from which he graduated in 1992.

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Afghanistan
4:16 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Afghan Tunnel: Decrepit, Dangerous Yet Indispensible

A truck drives down a highway on Salang Pass in Afghanistan's Parwan province in December. The Salang Tunnel, which crosses under the pass, provides a vital link between Central Asia and northern Afghanistan to Kabul.
Qais Usyan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:49 pm

The U.S. military says it's spending an extra $100 million a month on the war in Afghanistan since Pakistan closed its border to NATO supply convoys. Now, NATO is using a route thousands of miles longer through Russia and Central Asia.

That route passes through Afghanistan's perilous Salang Tunnel, 11,000 feet up in the Hindu Kush mountains. The Soviet-built tunnel was heralded as a marvel of engineering when completed in 1964.

But years of war, neglect and geology have turned it into a dangerous bottleneck.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:04 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Countdown To The Supreme Court's Ruling On Health Care

People wait outside the Supreme Court last week for word on the fate of the federal health overhaul law.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 6:46 am

Anticipation has reached a fever pitch, and the waiting is almost over.

This week, the Supreme Court is almost certain to issue its decision on the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law. The decision could have far-reaching implications for the legal landscape, the nation's health care system and even the Supreme Court's legacy.

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Author Interviews
4:04 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Fight For The Right To Hear, 'Yes, Chef'

Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 11:50 am

As you walk in the doors of Red Rooster, you immediately see a key piece of design: a bar dominates the front room, nearly touching the street, as if to say to the people of Harlem, N.Y., "Come on in."

The story behind the restaurant's owner, celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson, is more about life than food.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Finding The Common Thread

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:31 am

On-Air Challenge: You are given three words starting with the letter "F." The answer is a word that can follow each of those three words to complete a familiar two-word phrase. For example, if given "flag, father's and field," the answer would be "day."

Last Week's Challenge From listener Kate MacDonald of Murphys, Calif.: Think of a common French word that everyone knows. Add a "V" to the beginning and an "E" at the end. The result will be the English-language equivalent of the French word. What is it?

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Music
2:03 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Fresh Bluegrass For A Sultry Summer

CABOMA members play guitar and mandolin on a summer afternoon.
Devon Kodzis NPR

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 3:20 pm

In many places across the country, summer officially blasted in this week, which means that musicians who've wintered in dark rehearsal studios — and the street players who've been toiling away in cold and damp subway corridors — can now enjoy playing alfresco.

This summer, Weekend Edition is presenting audio postcards from musicians out-of-doors.

This installment comes from a group of bluegrass players who gather every couple of weeks at Lyon Park in Arlington, Va. They're members of the Capitol Area Bluegrass and Old-time Music Association, or CABOMA.

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Music Interviews
2:03 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Cassandra Wilson: 'The Guitar Is My Heart'

Cassandra Wilson explores geography, as well as a lifelong relationship with the guitar, on Another Country.
Marco Glaviano

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:31 am

Cassandra Wilson was once described by Time magazine as "America's best singer." Wilson was born in segregated Mississippi — also the birthplace of the blues — but she's always been on a journey to explore other sounds and influences.

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NPR Story
10:42 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Rodney King Found Dead

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Rodney King — whose 1991 beating by police officers was filmed and lead to riots in Los Angeles — was found at the bottom of his swimming pool early Sunday. He was 47. Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates about the beating and how its aftermath changed race relations in America forever.

Sports
5:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Relishing The Heat, Never Cowering From Thunder

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALLGAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ball game, being played each day...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If life is a ball game, then NPR's Mike Pesca is our man in Miami, relishing the heat, never cowering from the thunder. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Possibly setting fire to the rain, very good.

(LAUGHTER)

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Europe
5:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

France's New Leader Negotiates To Keep Promises

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There is another important vote taking place in Europe today. The French go to the polls and they're expected to give a clear parliamentary majority to the new socialist president, Francois Hollande. There are high expectations for Hollande in both France and throughout Europe. And he may soon have carte blanche to implement his policies.

But as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports, it won't be easy.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHILDREN TALKING)

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Europe
5:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Forecast For G-20: No Big Solutions

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Leaders of the world's biggest economies gather in Mexico this week for a two-day summit meeting. And while the backdrop is Baja, much of the attention will be on Europe. Economic troubles in the eurozone remain the biggest threat to the global economy though not the only one.

Joining us now to preview the G-20 meeting is NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with, Rachel.

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NPR Story
5:24 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Heading Into Iran Nuclear Talks, A Diplomatic Slump

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The up and down Iran nuclear talks appear to be in a down cycle as negotiators prepare to meet tomorrow in Moscow. Difficult talks in Baghdad last month were followed by contentious comments on both sides. And all this as new oil sanctions against Iran are due to take effect July 1st. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more from Moscow.

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NPR Story
5:24 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Trip To Afghanistan Gives Uncertain Outlook

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Now, to the war in Afghanistan. NPR's Tom Bowman is just back from a month-long reporting trip in Afghanistan. He was out with U.S. troops and Afghan security forces trying to get a sense of how those Afghan forces are doing, since the U.S. is going to be bringing home more than 20,000 troops at the end of the summer. So, the question is: Will security gains last after the Americans leave? Tom is here in the studio to talk about what he saw. Good morning.

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NPR Story
5:24 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Eyes On Greece In Elections Redo

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The eyes of Europe and global financial markets are on Greece today, where voters go to the polls in a re-run of the May elections that created a political stalemate. The vote could affect whether the debt-burdened country stays in the eurozone, or if it becomes the first member state to leave it.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Athens. Good morning, Sylvia. You have been out at polling stations today, what are Greek voters saying?

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Media
3:47 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Like Good Bourbon, Magazine Is A Sip Of The South

David DiBenedetto, the editor-in-chief of Garden & Gun, holds an editorial meeting in the magazine's Charleston, S.C., offices.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Garden & Gun magazine bills itself as the "Soul of the South." In five short years, the up-and-coming magazine has amassed a dedicated following and picked up critical acclaim.

The cover of the summer issue of Garden & Gun entices you to hit a Southern road. A smiling young woman in skinny white jeans, a straw hat and wayfarers tucked into her pocket appears ready to jump into a vintage red Mercedes roadster, top down — all under a bright Carolina blue sky.

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Author Interviews
3:47 am
Sun June 17, 2012

A Future President Finds Himself In New Obama Bio

A new biography of President Obama provides a rare glimpse of him as a young adult. In Barack Obama: The Story, journalist David Maraniss chronicles the president's "classic search for home."
AP

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 8:10 am

In the years since he took office, there has been no shortage of coverage of Barack Obama's presidency and politics. But for journalist David Maraniss, it is the president's personal history that remains intriguing.

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Presidential Race
3:46 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Campaign Ads Target Latinos As A Key Issue Looms

Daniella Urbina, a field organizer for President Obama in Denver, appears in a Spanish-language campaign ad.
YouTube

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

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Around the Nation
3:46 am
Sun June 17, 2012

States Stake Claim On Sir Francis Drake's Landing

Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.
Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Oregon and California are locked in a dispute over something that happened 433 years ago, when Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.

It happened on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where? Oregon or California? The National Park Service is now poised to officially recognize one state's claim.

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
3:42 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Frontlines Of Fatherhood: Catching Up After War

Sgt. Michael Clark and his fiancee, Kaitlin Forant, hold their son, Michael Clark Jr. It took time for the 18-month-old to recognize his father after Clark's deployment.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 5:58 pm

Last year, members of the 182nd National Guard regiment marked Father's Day far away from their loved ones. This year, they're home with their kids after a year in Afghanistan.

Spc. Bryan Tolley, 29, knows the challenges of being both a soldier and a dad. His son, Ryan, is a shy, blond 18-month-old who happily clings to his dad.

"Seeing his face light up when he sees Dada come through his bedroom door instead of Mama — because he's so used to his mother — it's awesome. I love it," says Tolley of Plymouth, Mass.

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Presidential Race
3:41 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Raucous Iowa Convention May Signal What's To Come

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 11:10 am

You know things are going badly when the person at the front of the room has to say, "This is not going well." The fireworks at Iowa's Republican State Convention began even before lunchtime Saturday. At one point during the day, the parliamentarian threatened to kick out the next person who tried to speak out of order.

If Saturday's convention is any indication, Mitt Romney may not be in for smooth sailing at this summer's national convention in Florida.

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Monkey See
11:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Can Men And Women Be Friends?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 7:41 am

It's a question that kicks around endlessly without resolution: Can men and women really be just friends? On Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Faith Salie and Mario Correa, hosts of WNYC's RelationShow, about this very topic.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Hit Me Baby One More Time

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a word, phrase or name starting with the letter "B," ending in "Y" and having "A" and "B" inside, in that order, although not necessarily consecutively. For example, if I said "assistant to a baseball team," the answer would be either "batboy" or "ballboy."

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Theater
10:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

The Stage On Which Juliet First Called Out For Romeo

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology recently excavated the site of the 16th-century Curtain Theatre, where Shakespeare staged some of his plays.
Museum of London Archaeology AP

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 1:05 pm

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of the Bard's old stomping grounds — ruins of a famous 16th-century theater, buried below the streets of modern London. Known in its heyday as the Curtain Theatre, it's often been eclipsed by its more famous younger sibling, the Globe.

But the Curtain is a big deal in its own right. Some of Shakespeare's most famous works premiered there — Romeo and Juliet and Henry V, just to name a couple. NPR's Rachel Martin talked to the archaeologist who dug up the theater, Chris Thomas of the Museum of London.

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Music Interviews
2:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

One Father, Eight Sons, Nine Shiny Brass Bells

The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble features eight of trumpeter Kelan Phil Cohran's sons.
Georgia Khun

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 1:52 pm

Over the course of 85-year-old Kelan Phil Cohran's long career as an avant-garde jazz trumpeter, he's toured the world, performing with everyone from Sun Ra to Sarah Vaughan.

When not on the road, Cohran has worked as a music educator, teaching music in schools and prisons, and to his own children.

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Europe
1:19 pm
Sun June 10, 2012

An Olympic Task: Finding Good Food At The 2012 Games

Vendors will serve 14 million meals during the Olympics, and critics are already panning the menu.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:43 pm

When the 2012 Summer Olympics begin in July, a culinary starting gun will go off: Fourteen million meals will be prepared for spectators and athletes during the Olympic and Paralympic games in London.

The criticism is already pouring in.

Jacquelin Magnay, the Olympics editor at The Daily Telegraph wrote a recent article calling the food to be sold at Olympic venues "bland and over-priced." In response, an Olympic caterer sent her a custom bento box of gourmet delicacies.

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NPR Story
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Pakistan Faces New Challenges Under Rising Tensions

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Just when it seemed that the fractious between the U.S. and its ally Pakistan couldn't get worse, they have. Calls on Capitol Hill to scale back aid to Pakistan are getting louder. And in the last couple of days, Pakistani officials have derided comments by U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta who, on a recent trip to Kabul, said the U.S. was, quote, "reaching the limits of its patience with Pakistan."

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World
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

What's The Role Of U.S. Aid In Pakistan

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Senator John Kerry is the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. And he is a key U.S. liaison to Pakistan. We asked him how relations stand between the two countries.

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World
5:27 am
Sun June 10, 2012

India Keeping Close Eye on Neighboring Pakistan

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, let's turn to how the country sees its own neighbors, Afghanistan and India in particular. This past week, we asked people in the streets of Islamabad whether those two relationships, or the one with the United States is more important.

NISAR SHAH: (Through Translator) I think at this time the most important thing for Pakistan is to make peace with India and other countries in the region. Borders should be opened, economy should be strengthened, and we should get rid of arms race.

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