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Podcasts

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:48am
    The judge composed a rhyme to let an Oregon man know he'd been found guilty of the crime: stealing a bulldog puppy from its owners at gunpoint.
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:48am
    The former governor faces a fine for exceeding the limit in Wasila, Alaska. She joked that the Sammy Hagar song distracted her, adding, "I wasn't speeding; I was qualifying."
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:05am
    An open revolt among moderate Kansas Republicans has clouded Gov. Sam Brownback's re-election hopes and focused national attention on the tax-cutting experiment at the heart of his "red-state model."
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:01am
    A few months ago, 24-year-old Anas Hamra made a "Happy" video about Gaza. If the rest of the world was playing off Pharrell Williams' song, he figured Gaza ought to step up, too. Plus, even with salty tap water and travel restrictions, life in Gaza was not all misery. On Wednesday, Hamra spent 24 hours with his video camera in Shifa Hospital in Gaza and emerged unable to find a word to describe how he feels. The first song that came to mind is "Wake Me Up When It's Over."
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:01am
    Aaron David Miller of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars talks with Steve Inskeep about Israel's call to demilitarize Gaza and whether such a proposal is realistic.

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World
1:49 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Pakistan's 'Patriot Act' Could Target Politicians

A policeman stands guard at the Parliament building in Islamabad, Pakistan, in June. The Lower House recently passed a bill similar to the United States' Patriot Act, touching off a debate about privacy in the country.
Ahmad Kamal Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 9:16 am

Earlier this month, Pakistan's powerful Lower House of Parliament passed what analysts have dubbed Pakistan's Patriot Act. Its name here is "Investigation for Fair Trial Bill."

It has been presented to the Pakistani people as a way to update existing law and usher the rules for investigation in Pakistan into the 21st century. Among other things, it makes electronic eavesdropping admissible as evidence in court.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:48 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Mosquito Maven Takes Bites For Malaria Research

Chiara Andolina, a malaria researcher in Thailand, feeds her mosquito colony by letting the insects bite her right arm. These mosquitoes are picky and will dine only on live human blood.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 9:47 am

Most of us do everything possible to avoid mosquitoes. But one Italian researcher literally sacrifices her right arm to keep the lowly insects alive.

Chiara Adolina is studying a new malaria drug, and she needs the little suckers for her experiments. So she feeds them each day with her own blood.

She extends her arm into a mosquito cage to give the insects "breakfast." Several dozen mosquitoes spread across her forearm and jam their proboscises into her skin. "Can you see how fat they become?" she says. "Look at that tummy."

Read more
Sweetness And Light
11:41 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

New Jersey Tries To Horn In On Nevada's Gambling Turf

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 9:16 am

For those dearly devoted of you who paid attention to me in September, I noted that the best bet in the NFL had proven to be whenever a West Coast team played an East Coast team at night, because the Pacific players had their body clocks better set.

Read more
NPR Story
7:42 am
Tue January 1, 2013

'Fiscal Cliff' Measure Heads To The House

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 10:39 am

A compromise deal to stop broad spending cuts and tax increases is headed to the House of Representatives, after receiving strong support in the Senate. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., talks with Steve Inskeep about a possible House vote on the "fiscal cliff" deal.

Cole, the House deputy majority whip who also serves on the Appropriations Committee, says he expects the House to approve the Senate bill, calling it "a pretty big win."

Read more
Health Care
5:10 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Hobby Lobby Plans To Defy Health Care Mandate

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This New Year could mean a new cost for the craft store chain Hobby Lobby. The federal health care law requires employee insurance plans to cover emergency contraceptives. Hobby Lobby's owners did not want to do that. They say drugs commonly known by names like the morning-after pill are tantamount to abortion.

Now, the Supreme Court has turned aside Hobby Lobby's request to block the mandate. So, starting today, the company could be fined as much as $1.3 million per day for defying the law.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Around the Nation
4:41 am
Tue January 1, 2013

School Wants 'Bucket List' To Kick The Bucket

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

Michigan's Lake Superior State University issued its annual list of annoying expressions to banish. The list includes: trending, bucket list, kick the can down the road and spoiler alert. The top one to ban: fiscal cliff.

Around the Nation
4:33 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Mayor Settles Council Election Tie With Coin Toss

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Democracy sure works in mysterious ways. In Seguin, Texas, a December city council election ended in a dead tie. Both candidates received 141 votes. So it was up to the mayor to settle things. The law gave him some options: drawing straws or tossing dice. He chose an old coin toss. The silver dollar landed, it was tails, and immediately Jeannette Crabb was sworn into a four-year term. She's coming to office with quite a mandate.

Shots - Health News
3:13 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012

Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012.
Heather Charles MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 8:08 am

The past year has seen more debate about the best way to find breast cancers.

A recent analysis concluded that regular mammograms haven't reduced the rate of advanced breast cancers — but they have led more than a million women to be diagnosed with tumors that didn't need to be treated.

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Latin America
3:08 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Mexico's President Alters Tactics Against Drug Crimes

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It has been a busy year in Mexico's war on drugs. The administration of former President Felipe Calderon struck major blows to the country's largest cartels, slowing the violence that has claimed more than 50,000 lives.

But the new president, Enrique Pena Nieto, says he'll change tactics. He wants to go after the crime associated with drug trafficking instead of taking down crime bosses. His new attorney general says this is the right strategy, since the number of crime gangs working in the country has grown significantly.

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Business
3:08 am
Tue January 1, 2013

What Does Senate Budget Deal Mean For You?

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year.

Let's start with the upside. Congress has yet to rattle the financial markets so far in 2013.

GREENE: Of course, the markets are closed on this New Year's Day, as the House considers a deal on taxes and spending. The Senate has already approved that plan by a huge majority.

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Southword
1:17 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Coming Home — And Out — In The South

Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, based in Washington, D.C.
Dave Anderson Oxford American magazine

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 3:17 pm

Many years ago, a young Chad Griffin left his hometown of Arkadelphia, Ark., to pursue a career in politics. Today, he's the newest head of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) — a powerful gay rights group based in Washington, D.C.

Read more
Law
1:00 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Justice Wants Banks To Be Quasi Cops

Assistant U.S. Attorney General Lanny Breuer announces a nearly $2 billion money laundering settlement with British bank HSBC on Dec. 11 in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

Every year, banks handle tens of millions of transactions. Some of them involve drug money, or deals with companies doing secret business with countries like Iran and Syria, in defiance of trade sanctions.

But if the Justice Department has its way, banks will be forced to change — to spot illegal transactions and blow the whistle before any money changes hands.

Federal prosecutors have already collected more than $4.5 billion from some of the world's biggest financial institutions — banks charged with looking the other way when dirty money passed through their accounts.

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Science
1:00 am
Tue January 1, 2013

The Year Of The Higgs, And Other Tiny Advances In Science

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of the Higgs boson on July 4, the long-sought building block of the universe. This image shows a computer-simulation of data from the collider.
Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

It's a year-end tradition to cobble together a list of the most important advances in science. But, truth be told, many ideas that change the world don't tend to spring from these flashy moments of discovery. Our view of nature — and our technology — often evolve from a sequence of more subtle advances.

Even so, chances are good that this year's list-makers will choose the discovery of the Higgs boson as the most important discovery of 2012.

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World
12:58 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Multiple Feuds Bring A Record Year Of Violence To Karachi

Gul Mohammed Khan has lost three sons in sectarian violence during the last two years, in Karachi, Pakistan. He stands here with some of his grandchildren who have lost their fathers. When he looks at his grandchildren, he says, he sees his sons.
Dina Temple-Raston/NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 8:35 am

The sad truth about Karachi in 2012 was that whatever your religion, business affiliation, or political party, someone was willing to kill you for it.

The murder rate in Pakistan's largest city and commercial hub hit an all time high last year. Over 2,500 people died in violent crimes in Karachi in 2012, a 50 percent increase over the year before.

Most of the deaths were attributable to sectarian killings and score settling. Shia Muslims took on the brunt of the violence. But Sunni Muslims were killed in reprisal attacks that added to the tally.

Read more
Business
12:57 am
Tue January 1, 2013

New Year Brings Minimum-Wage Hikes In 10 States

Rhode Island's minimum wage will increase from $7.40 to $7.75.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 12:23 pm

On Tuesday, the minimum wage in 10 states will increase by anywhere from a dime to 35 cents.

For all of the states but one, the pay hikes are part of automatic adjustments designed to keep up with the cost of living.

In Rhode Island, it took a state law to raise the minimum wage for the first time in five years.

Rising Wages Vs. Rising Prices

Cafe Zog in Providence is a cozy, quirky place where you can grab a coffee and bagel to go, or nab a booth then head to the counter to order a hot breakfast.

Read more
Business
12:56 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Rift With China Clouds Solar Industry's Future

Solar panels come off the line at SunPower's solar manufacturing plant near San Jose, Calif.
Lauren Sommer for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 7:44 am

It's been a banner year for solar energy. The United States is on track to install a record number of solar power systems — thanks in large part to low-cost solar panels from China. That's been challenging for American manufacturers, and federal officials have put trade tariffs on Chinese panels.

Things look busy at the SunPower solar manufacturing plant in Silicon Valley. Workers are screwing frames onto shiny, 6-foot solar panels as they come off the line.

Read more
Best Music Of 2012
8:12 am
Mon December 31, 2012

In Memoriam: Musicians We Lost In 2012

Whitney Houston performs in 1988.
David Corio Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 12:26 pm

NPR Music remembers the singers, instrumentalists, songwriters and personalities who died in 2012. Explore their musical legacies by launching our musical interactive here or by clicking on the image.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
5:12 am
Mon December 31, 2012

Possum Drop Will Be Held In Brasstown, N.C.

Transcript

STEVEN INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A New Year's tradition will change in Brasstown, North Carolina. Instead of the Times Square Ball, Clay's Corner Store lowered a love possum in a box. Store owner Clay Logan tells the Chattanooga Times Free Press we aren't pessimistic or optimistic. We're opposumistic. But nobody asked the possum. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals sued. Now Mr. Logan says he'll drop a stuffed animal, or road kill, depending on what's available. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:04 am
Mon December 31, 2012

Popular Baby Names For 2013

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon December 31, 2012

Secretary Clinton Hospitalized With Blood Clot

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 4:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's turn to some other developments we're following very closely. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in a New York City hospital this morning. She is being treated for a blood clot. Now, a State Department spokesman said this stems from a concussion Clinton sustained earlier this month. The blood clot was discovered during a follow-up exam yesterday.

We're joined in the studio by two of our colleagues, NPR foreign affairs correspondent Jackie Northam and NPR science editor Rob Stein. Good morning to both of you.

Read more
NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon December 31, 2012

Sex Men Charged In India's Fatal Gang-Rape

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 7:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In India, protestors are vowing to keep up their fight until there is justice for the young victim of a gang rape. The young woman died this weekend after injuries she suffered in the vicious attack. The incident has renewed demands for action against sexual violence. Delhi police say the accused will be formally charged with murder. From New Delhi, here's NPR's Julie McCarthy.

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Economy
2:13 am
Mon December 31, 2012

Europe Fails To Stimulate Growth In 2012

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 10:52 am

The U.S. economy grew at a steady though not very strong pace this year. But Europe slipped back into recession because of the ongoing debt crisis. European leaders took steps to stimulate growth, but it wasn't enough to reverse course.

The economic crisis that got under way five years ago was felt all over the world. But Mohammed El-Erian, CEO of the investment firm PIMCO, says different regions have healed at much different rates.

The year "2012 was another multispeed world globally, in the sense that different parts did different things," he says.

Read more
Politics
1:33 am
Mon December 31, 2012

After Fruitless Weekend, Congress Still Seeks Fiscal Deal

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-KY, leaves the Senate chamber to caucus in the Capitol on Sunday.
Molly Riley AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 3:46 am

It is almost unimaginable that both the House and Senate would be in session on a Sunday evening on the penultimate day of the year. And yet, they both were, with lawmakers hoping it was not merely a big waste of time and effort.

A bipartisan push by Senate leaders over the weekend has so far failed to forge a deal to spare American wage earners from tax hikes and shield government programs from drastic cutbacks.

Read more
Planet Money
1:32 am
Mon December 31, 2012

The Fiscal Cliff: A Love Story

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 3:46 am

America, if you're scared by all the talk you've been hearing about the fiscal cliff, take heart: There are reasons for people across the political spectrum to love the cliff.

There's a lot for liberals to like in the fiscal cliff, says Matthew Yglesias, who writes wonky articles about economics for Slate.

Read more
Planet Money
10:28 am
Fri December 28, 2012

What A Former FBI Hostage Negotiator Can Teach Us About The Fiscal Cliff

Drew Angerer Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 11:27 am

The tortuous negotiations involved in the "fiscal cliff" talks are like a chess game.

To shed some light on the kinds of negotiation techniques that members of Congress might be using during the talks, we asked two negotiators to walk us through their tactics with examples from their everyday lives.

Read more
Europe
5:40 am
Fri December 28, 2012

Present Thief Nabbed In France

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:31 am
Fri December 28, 2012

Author Offers Unique Reward To Finder Of His Dog

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Business
4:37 am
Fri December 28, 2012

SEC Filing Reveals Apple CEO's Pay Package

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big pay cut.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Apple hit a big milestone this year when it became the most highly valued public company in history. So it may be a surprise to hear that Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, saw a big dip in salary - like, a 99 percent dip.

Business
4:37 am
Fri December 28, 2012

The last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 5:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business has the Second City coming in first, but I have a feeling this will not be a source of pride. In 2013, Chicago will have the most expensive parking meters in North America.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Europe
3:06 am
Fri December 28, 2012

Russia's Putin Signs Controversial Adoption Bill

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 11:42 am

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a measure into law that would ban Americans from adopting Russian children.

Russia's parliament had overwhelmingly approved the ban, which was designed as retaliation for a new U.S. law that sanctions Russian officials accused of human rights violations.

The adoption ban stirred outrage in Russia as well as the United States.

An online petition against the measure rapidly collected more than 100,000 signatures in Russia.

Read more

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