The Phrase Or Name Is Familiar: Try This Puzzle And See What They Are | KUER 90.1

The Phrase Or Name Is Familiar: Try This Puzzle And See What They Are

Feb 21, 2016
Originally published on February 27, 2016 6:47 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word ends in the letter -E, and the second word starts GO-.

For example: Something you might say when you're about to take a plunge --> HERE GOES.

Last week's challenge: Name something to eat. Change one letter in it and rearrange the result. You'll name the person who makes this food. Who is it?

Answer: Bread and baker.

Winner: Mary Ann Gaeddert, of Georgetown, Ky.

Next week's challenge: Think of three eight-letter words that are identical in spelling except for the fourth letter. Each word contains a G ... that is pronounced differently in all three words. What words are they?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, Feb. 25 at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Donald Trump is feuding with the pope. And if that makes your brain kind of hurt, let's play the puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Joining me now is Will Shortz. He is puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Rachel.

MARTIN: OK, Will. Remind us of last week's puzzle.

SHORTZ: Yeah, it was an easy one. I said name something to eat. Change one letter in it, and rearrange the result. You'll name a person who makes this thing. What is it? Well, the answer was bread to baker. And I tell you we had an amazing alternative answer. Do you know temaki?

MARTIN: Temaki?

SHORTZ: It's a sushi handroll, T-E-M-A-K-I.

MARTIN: OK.

SHORTZ: And you can do that operation, and you get itamae...

MARTIN: Wow.

SHORTZ: ...I-T-A-M-A-E. It's a skilled sushi chef.

MARTIN: Wow. And you didn't know that answer?

SHORTZ: Oh, I did not know that, no.

MARTIN: Very cool.

SHORTZ: But (laughter) we have some smart listeners.

MARTIN: Indeed. So we got over 1,200 correct answers this week. Our randomly selected winner is Mary Ann Gaeddert. She lives in Georgetown, Ky., and she's on the line now.

Mary Ann, congratulations.

MARY ANN GAEDDERT: Thank you.

MARTIN: Did this come pretty easily to you?

GAEDDERT: It came very easily. I got it right away.

MARTIN: Oh, good for you.

GAEDDERT: And I was sitting at the breakfast table, and (laughter) there was bread on the table.

MARTIN: Oh - so you kind of had a hint there lying right in front of you. What's life like in Georgetown, Ky.?

GAEDDERT: It's beautiful. It's a beautiful place to live in the middle of the Bluegrass. It's very pretty.

MARTIN: And I understand you were a schoolteacher. You're retired now. What did you teach?

GAEDDERT: I taught Spanish and German.

MARTIN: I think that people who are good at languages are typically good at puzzles, right, Will?

SHORTZ: Yes.

MARTIN: Yeah. OK. So Mary Anne, are you ready to put your skills to the test and do the Sunday puzzle with us?

GAEDDERT: I am.

MARTIN: All right then, Will. Take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Mary Ann and Rachel, today you're going to have to hide your ego. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or a name in which the first word ends in the letter E and the second word starts G-O.

For example, if I said something you might say when you're about to take a plunge, you'd say - here goes.

MARTIN: All right. Let's give it a go.

SHORTZ: Number one, and outdoor game sometimes called putt putt.

GAEDDERT: Miniature golf.

SHORTZ: That's it. Number two - Odin or Thor.

GAEDDERT: Would you repeat that?

SHORTZ: Odin, O-D-I-N, Odin or Thor.

GAEDDERT: Norse god.

MARTIN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Norse god is it. A term in economics for cars, home appliances and other purchases intended to last a long time.

GAEDDERT: Rachel, can you help me on this one?

MARTIN: Yeah. I think - so - this is a hint. The last word is good.

SHORTZ: Zuh (ph), plural.

MARTIN: Zuh? Oh, yeah, goods. Here I am thinking I'm being so smart - goods. And the first word is something that's really sturdy.

Durable.

GAEDDERT: Durable goods.

MARTIN: Right? Am I right?

SHORTZ: Durable goods is it. Good. Yes, you got it.

MARTIN: I'm saying that like I know what I'm talking about, but (laughter)...

SHORTZ: (Laughter) Bingo.

Try this one - jacking up the cost of things during an emergency.

Like, there's a scarcity of things and - what do unscrupulous dealers do?

GAEDDERT: I don't know.

MARTIN: They raise their...

SHORTZ: That's right.

MARTIN: It's a price gouge.

SHORTZ: Price gouge, price gouging. Good one.

GAEDDERT: Price gouge, right.

SHORTZ: There you go. Try this one - chit chat about rumors and such.

GAEDDERT: Some kind of gossip - idle gossip.

SHORTZ: Idle gossip is it.

MARTIN: Good.

SHORTZ: Howard Hughes's airplane.

GAEDDERT: The Spruce Goose.

SHORTZ: That's it. To silently signal one's parting, especially from a distance.

GAEDDERT: To wave goodbye.

SHORTZ: Wave goodbye, good. Political entity between federal and local.

GAEDDERT: State government.

SHORTZ: That's it. Another name for the ibex, so-called because of the mountain range it inhabits.

GAEDDERT: The Alpine goat?

SHORTZ: Oh, man. Good job.

MARTIN: Whoa, good.

SHORTZ: Hit singer of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s, married to Steve Lawrence.

GAEDDERT: Eydie Gorme.

SHORTZ: That's it. And here's your last one - words of praise after someone does a fine job.

GAEDDERT: Words of praise. Something good?

SHORTZ: No.

MARTIN: I don't - words of praise...

SHORTZ: When someone does a good job and you would say...

MARTIN: (Laughter).

SHORTZ: And the first word is nice.

MARTIN: Oh.

GAEDDERT: Nice going.

MARTIN: Nice going.

SHORTZ: Nice going is it.

MARTIN: Nice going, Mary Ann. Good work. For playing the puzzle, you get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin and puzzle books and games. If you're curious, you can read about your prizes at npr.org/puzzle. And where do you listen to us, Mary Anne?

GAEDDERT: At WEKU from Richmond, Ky.

MARTIN: Mary Ann Gaeddert of Georgetown, Ky.

Mary Ann, thanks for playing the puzzle.

GAEDDERT: Oh, well, thank you.

MARTIN: Will, what's up for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, the challenge comes from listener Alan Christenson (ph) of Seattle.

Think of three eight-letter words that are identical in spelling except for the fourth letter. Each word contains a G that is pronounced differently in all three words. What words are they?

So again, three eight-letter words - they are spelled the same except for the fourth letter. Each word has a G that's pronounced differently in all three words. What words are they?

MARTIN: When you have the answer, go to npr.org/puzzle. Click on the submit your answer link and just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for those entries is Thursday, February 25, at 3 p.m. Eastern time. Don't forget to include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time because if you're the winner, then we'll give you a call and then you get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times. And he is WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Mr. Will Shortz.

Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Rachel.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CULPALE A LA BOSSA NOVA")

EYDIE GORME: (Singing) Culpale a la bossa nova, de lo que paso, culpale a la bossa nova... Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.