Andrea Smardon

Reporter

Andrea Smardon is a reporter specializing in healthcare, business, labor, and immigration. She joined KUER in November, 2011, and after her first year was awarded best Utah radio reporter by the Society of Professional Journalists. Previously, she worked as a reporter and news announcer for WGBH radio. While in Boston, she produced stories for Morning Edition, Marketplace Money, and The World. Prior to that, she worked at Seattle’s NPR affiliate KUOW. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT with a double major in English and Music. When not reporting, she enjoys playing clarinet and accordion music from all over the world, eating creative dinners made by her husband, and making up rhymes with her daughter, Ruby.

Ways to Connect

Andrea Smardon / KUER

One in every 58 children in Utah is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. To meet the rising need for resources, Utah Valley University broke ground Thursday on a new 8.4 million dollar autism center.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Utah researchers have found that sexual trauma in the military is associated with a much higher risk for homelessness. They’ve published their conclusions in a new study.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

In an official ceremony Tuesday, Utah Governor Gary Herbert signed a resolution declaring pornography a public health crisis.

courtesy Salt Lake Chamber

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on whether President Obama's 2014 executive actions on immigration are constitutional. Utah business leaders are disappointed that this issue is still not resolved. 

Andrea Smardon / KUER

A proposed air quality permit for a new medical waste incinerator in Tooele County is open for public comment. The move allows an old plant to be removed from a residential neighborhood in North Salt Lake, but it also means the company could burn more waste and emit more pollutants into the air. State environmental officials are holding a meeting Monday night in Tooele to answer questions and hear concerns.

Keoni Cabral via CC Flickr http://bit.ly/1qn7vCr

Utah’s law prohibiting bigamy has been reinstated following a ruling by federal appeals court judges. The move has dealt a legal blow to the Brown family from the reality TV show “Sister Wives.”

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Next month, a doctor performing an abortion in Utah will be required to administer anesthesia after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Passed by the legislature in the recent session, the new law is the first of its kind in the nation. It’s based on the disputed notion that a fetus may feel pain during the procedure.

Image courtesy Talk to a Survivor

Wednesday is “Start By Believing Day” in Utah. The public awareness campaign is aimed at changing the way people respond to rape and sexual assault. DeAnn Tilton is a survivor of sexual assault and creator of the organization Talk to a Survivor. Tilton says victims are too often silenced out of fear that people will not believe them or they will be blamed.

Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, UCSF

A new study finds that Utah’s law mandating at least a 72-hour waiting period for an abortion procedure has done little to dissuade women from their decision, but the study reveals additional costs, delays and anxiety for women who go on to have an abortion.

Courtesy Domo

The CEO of one of Utah’s largest tech start-ups Domo made a major announcement this week.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Democrats turned out in record numbers for last night’s caucus and supported presidential candidate Bernie Sanders by a margin of nearly three to one over Hillary Clinton. Many were participating for the first time.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

The Utah Pride Center is starting a new support group for survivors of suicide. The mission of the group is to offer LGBT survivors who have attempted suicide a safe, welcoming, and non-judgmental place to talk about their experiences. Coordinator Jillian Hill says she sees a real need for this in Utah.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

The GOP presidential debate scheduled for Monday in Utah was canceled after Donald Trump announced that he would not participate. As Utah Republicans head into caucuses on Tuesday, the GOP frontrunner is not expected to do as well here as he has elsewhere in the country.

Image Medscape.com

The legislative session ended with no action on medical marijuana, but lawmakers and advocates are already strategizing for their next moves.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

One of the most hotly contested issues in the legislature this year was medical marijuana, but lawmakers ran out of time before they could pass any legislation.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

After several years of debate, the Utah legislature has approved a partial Medicaid expansion, but Democratic lawmakers say they’re not done with this issue yet.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

One medical marijuana bill appears to be dead in the Utah legislature, while another advances to the House floor.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

The state House of Representatives has approved a bill that would provide Medicaid benefits to a limited number of Utahns in poverty. Most House Republicans supported the measure, but Democrats were conflicted.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Democrats are opposing a bill that would extend Medicaid benefits to a limited number of Utahns in poverty. They say it doesn’t go far enough, but the Republican plan doesn’t need support from the minority party to pass.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Local leaders gathered at the Utah Capitol Tuesday to throw their support behind legislation that would provide health coverage to those in extreme poverty.

Brian Grimmett / KUER

A House committee approved a limited Medicaid expansion bill Monday afternoon, but health care advocates around the state are not all unified in support.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Vice President Joe Biden visited the Huntsman Cancer Institute Friday to talk about Utah’s role in the national “moonshot” initiative to eliminate cancer as we know it.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

The Utah House of Representatives will get a chance to debate medical marijuana. The Senate voted 17 to 12 to pass a broad measure that would allow Utah patients to use cannabis extracts when recommended by a doctor.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

With just about two weeks left in the legislative session, it’s not clear if anything will get done on expanding Medicaid this year.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Utah Senators were expected to take a vote on medical marijuana legislation Tuesday, but the bill’s sponsor Mark Madsen asked for more time to talk with his colleagues. Meanwhile, there’s an amendment in the works to address the risk of children overdosing.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Utah got one step closer to legalized medical marijuana Monday. In a close vote, the Utah Senate gave preliminary approval to a broad cannabis bill, but advocates are not optimistic the bill will make it past the next vote.

Brian Grimmett / KUER

Medical marijuana is not dead yet. Senators have delayed a vote on a broad plan, and they say it may be too close to call at this point.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

A bill that would provide paid parental leave to state employees may not make it to a vote this legislative session.

University of Utah School of Medicine Division of Epilepsy

While debate rages at the Utah Capitol over two competing medical marijuana bills, one lawmaker has come up with a resolution to encourage more research that all sides seem to agree on.

Andrea Smardon / KUER

Medical marijuana advocates are regrouping after LDS Church authorities announced their opposition to a bill that would make whole-plant access legal in Utah. Proponents convened at the Capitol Tuesday to talk about an effort to let the voters decide.

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