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Julia Ritchey / KUER

Utah’s Love-Hate Relationship With The Caucus-Convention System

A 2014 law known as S.B. 54 expanded access to the primary ballot, but it’s also divided those who prefer caucuses over direct elections. Four years later, Republicans are still arguing about the caucus-convention system and its future.

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When someone calls 911, we don’t really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. Listen to this week's More To Say.

Nicole Nixon / KUER

Gov. Gary Herbert is on "Team Martha."

A new question on the 2020 census about citizenship is heading to court.  The U.S. Conference of Mayors is filing a suit contesting its inclusion. But not everyone in the region is on board.  

Erik Neumann / KUER

Officials with the Salt Lake County Health Department announced two deaths from hepatitis A this week. They mark the first two fatalities in a months-long outbreak of the disease, but experts say the epidemic is starting to recede.

When Martin Luther King, Jr. flew from Atlanta to Memphis on the morning of April 3, 1968, he was not in a particularly good state of mind.

"While the plane was about to take off, there was a bomb threat that was specifically targeted at King and that delayed the departure of the flight," says Joseph Rosenbloom, author of the new book Redemption: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Last 31 Hours. "They brought dogs onto the plane, they evacuated the passengers. And so the plane arrived an hour or so late in Memphis."

screenshot from www.tveyes.com

Employees at Salt Lake City’s Sinclair-owned station KUTV are dismayed and embarrassed about a recent editorial their anchors were forced to read that criticized other media outlets for sharing “false news.” An employee who works for the CBS affiliate but requested anonymity to speak candidly said the unease goes all the way up to management. 

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's call to increase peak-season entrance fees at 17 popular national parks appears to be an unpopular idea. The overwhelming majority of submitted comments were strongly opposed to it. Now, the National Park Service is rethinking the plan.

The Environmental Protection Agency just announced its plan to roll back vehicle emissions standards. That could be cause for concern in Mountain West communities with poor air quality.

Joe_Guetzloff/www.istockphoto.com

There’s still time for Salt Lake City residents to tell city leaders what they think about a proposed sales tax increase. An open house and public hearing are scheduled Tuesday night at city hall.

The omnibus spending bill passed by Congress last month earmarked billions of dollars for fighting wildfires.  Many conservationists and politicians celebrated that change.

But the legislation also rolls rolls back some environmental protections and that has split the conservation community.

The Chinese government has retaliated in what appears to be an escalating trade war. The government says it will slap tariffs on a long list of American goods including pork and fruit, a move that could put producers across the region in a bind.

China buys a lot of American pork. And while Iowa may be this country’s pig-producing colossus, tariffs would hit producers everywhere, including states in the Mountain West like Utah and Colorado.  

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RadioWest

The Real-life Laura Ingalls Wilder

Friday, we’re talking about the real-life Laura Ingalls Wilder and how her story compares to the mythic American history many of us absorbed through her wildly popular series The Little House books.

Podcast: More To Say

KUER

This week on More to Say we’re putting out an episode we made back in November, about a police dispatcher. When someone calls 911, we don’t really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. When something goes wrong, or someone dies, the dispatcher has to live with it.

Original story: http://kuer.org/post/emergency-dispatchers-mental-toll-high-stress-job#stream/0

Click here for more from "More To Say"

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At schools across the country today, students are getting up from their desks and walking out when the clock strikes ten. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence.

Today marks 19 years since the shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two high school students shot and killed thirteen people.

Gina Haspel, the first woman nominated to lead the CIA, has a five-foot-tall poster of Johnny Cash in her office. She's an avid University of Kentucky basketball fan — though she transferred from that school and graduated from the rival University of Louisville. She majored in journalism.

A few months ago, I wrote a check for $12,000 but couldn't figure out exactly why.

The payment was to secure a place for my mother at Sligo Creek Center, in Takoma Park, Md. It's a nursing home and rehab center owned by Genesis Healthcare.

My mother was about to be discharged from Holy Cross Hospital, in nearby Silver Spring, after a fall. Medicare wouldn't pay for her rehabilitation care.

Africa's last absolute monarch has marked his country's 50th birthday with a rather unconventional gift: a different name. During Golden Jubilee celebrations Thursday, King Mswati III announced that from this point henceforth, the land formerly known as Swaziland is now to be known as the Kingdom of eSwatini.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is levying a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo — a record for the agency — in punishment for the banking giant's actions in its mortgage and auto loan businesses.

Wells Fargo's "conduct caused and was likely to cause substantial injury to consumers," the agency said in its filings about the bank.

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