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Whittney Evans

New Hemp and Weed Laws Draw Interested Growers At First Public Hearing

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food took comments from the public on Thursday over how to implement the state’s new medical marijuana and hemp laws. Many of the people who came were interested in going into business with the state. One Utah man said he wants to move his Colorado hemp oil company across state lines.

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When someone calls 911, we don’t really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. Listen to this week's More To Say.

A menace lurks beneath the snow high up in the southern Rocky Mountains.

At first glance it seems innocuous, another piece of a dynamic alpine ecosystem, certainly unable to cause the cascade of problems scientists say it could. How could something so simple undermine our water infrastructure, stress wildlife and lengthen the wildfire season all at once?

For most of the winter it stays hidden, buried under blankets of snow. Then, the days grow longer. The sun’s rays begin to melt the top layers, causing water to percolate through the snow and ice or evaporate, revealing the villain of this story.

Dust.

The Federal Communications Commission starts dismantling net neutrality regulations on April 23, 2018. That could mean when you’re watching that next episode of ‘The Crown” it could buffer endlessly or not. No one really knows yet.  

Erik Neumann / KUER

Stakeholders from the Our Schools Now initiative met with Gov. Gary Herbert today at Meadowbrook Elementary School in Bountiful. They were there for a ceremonial signing of the legislative compromise to bring more money to public schools in Utah. But the deal isn’t finalized.

More young people in Utah are using racial slurs on social media. And schools are working with the NAACP to try and stop it.

Kelsie Moore / KUER


The term “blog” is outdated these days. But, for all intents and purposes, that’s what By Common Consent is. It became popular during a time when Mormon blogs were popping up left and right. Now, a lot of them have fizzled out. But, with tens of thousands of hits each week, By Common Consent is as strong as ever.

istock

Some candidates for legislative and county-level races can set their sights on the Nov. 6 election. Others are headed for primaries in June.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

Across the country on Saturday, pro-gun groups will rally in support of the Second Amendment. There are demonstrations planned in three Utah cities.

Democrats on Capitol Hill are calling for an investigation into the National Park Service, pointing to a report they say follows a "pattern" of censoring scientists who study climate change. So I checked in with the scientist who wrote the latest report and is now worried about her future.

Julia Ritchey / KUER


Ever since he was a young boy, Will Durham admits he’s had an affinity for neon. It’s hard not to when you grow up casino-studded town like Reno, Nevada.

Lee Hale / KUER

Issues of sexual abuse have been bubbling up for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints over the last few months. And while a Mormon #MeToo movement seems to be growing, there are a few things holding it back.

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RadioWest

The Value of Teachers

Thursday, we’re talking about the money teachers make, and what that tells us about how the profession is valued. We’ll also ask how Utah stacks up and what the state is doing about it.

Podcast: More To Say

KUER

This week on More to Say we’re putting out an episode we made back in November, about a police dispatcher. When someone calls 911, we don’t really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. When something goes wrong, or someone dies, the dispatcher has to live with it.

Original story: http://kuer.org/post/emergency-dispatchers-mental-toll-high-stress-job#stream/0

Click here for more from "More To Say"

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NPR News

Teachers in Arizona held a strike vote on Thursday that launched a first-ever statewide walkout and turned down a proposed pay raise — instead demanding increased school funding.

The Arizona Education Association and the grassroots group the Arizona Educators United announced that teachers will walk off the job April 26.

At issue is a plan crafted by Gov. Doug Ducey to give teachers a 20 percent raise by 2020, starting with a 9 percent hike next year.

It’s International Dark Sky Week, a time to look up and enjoy the night sky across the globe.  Our region is home to many dark sky parks and communities. We’re also home to lots of growth and that means growing light pollution.  

Sir Alan Parker announced Thursday he was stepping down as chair of Save the Children International and resigning from the board. The move follows accusations of inappropriate behavior leveled against former leadership at the charity that bills itself as helping 50 million of the world's most vulnerable children each year.

"Given the complex mix of challenges the organisation and the sector is facing, it is my view that a change is needed," Parker said in a letter to his colleagues.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In the last few years, some European countries have refused to take in refugees, prejudiced views have entered the mainstream, and leaders demonize religious minorities and attack the free press.

Nils Muiznieks has raised alarms about many of these issues. He's just finished his six-year term as the Council of Europe's human rights commissioner, the continent's main human rights watchdog.

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