Utah Division of Water Quality

Utah Division of Water Quality

Seventy-five-thousand dollars. That’s the sum the state paid for two week’s worth of testing at Utah Lake during the height of last month’s cyanobacteria outbreak. July’s heat combined with pollution from runoff and sewer plants created a poisonous stew of toxic bacteria and thick mats of green sludge. Health and environment officials fielded hundreds of calls.

Ben Holcomb, Utah Department of Environmental Quality

In wake of Utah Lake’s toxic algal bloom, Provo city officials are wary of jumping on a solution. Last week the Provo City Council and Mayor issued a joint resolution urging the state Department of Environmental Quality not to impose new water quality standards on Utah Lake.

Toxic Algal Bloom Prompts Closure of Utah Lake

Jul 15, 2016
Utah DEQ

State officials closed Utah Lake on Friday due to health concerns from a large algal bloom. The Utah Department of Health is warning against using the lake for swimming, boating and other types of recreation.

Judy Fahys/KUER

Water managers warn that Utah faces over $30 billion in water needs in coming decades. But auditors reported last year that the state’s water oversight is too patchy to know what projects are really needed.

Linde Cater / National Park Service

The first draft of a proposal to construct a giant straw from Lake Powell to southwestern Utah has landed on the desk of federal regulators just as new concerns about the project are being raised in the State Capitol.

Two cement-company partners and their businesses are accused of illegally dumping building waste in wetlands near the Jordan River.

Judy Fahys/KUER

Salt Lake City has put its big open-space bond measure on hold. But that hasn’t dampened enthusiasm throughout the valley for restoring the Jordan River.

Here at Oxbow Nature Park, money from the 2010 Red Butte oil spill has helped build wetlands where railroad cars used to roll by. These meanders and pools now provide habitat for birds and fish and control storm water. And the riverside vegetation helps remove toxic chemicals from the soil.

EPA / Flickr Creative Commons

Two Utah congressmen want the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to explain how it spilled millions of gallons of polluted mine water last month into rivers the agency was supposed to protect.

Warren Hanratty via Creative Commons

Several dry winters have prompted two local governments to offer tools to help Utahns save water.

Bob Nelson

A broad coalition of water conservation groups is calling for a legislative audit of the Utah Division of Water Resources. The partnership includes Living Rivers, the Taxpayer Association of Kane County and Glen Canyon Institute. Zack Frankel is the executive director of Utah Rivers Council which is also part of the coalition.

Willard Bay Cleanup Underway

Apr 11, 2013
Dan Bammes

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  A Chevron safety manager briefed reporters before taking them on a tour of the cleanup area at Willard Bay State Park on Wednesday.  The Chevron pipeline next to I-15 split open in mid-March, allowing more than 20,000 gallons of diesel fuel to spill into a wetland area next to the park’s North Marina.