snow

Tax Day Storm Stands Out

Apr 15, 2015
USU Webcam

The storm that bounded into Utah Tuesday stands out as an epic weather event for a number of reasons.

Wind gusts topped 60 miles an hour at dozens of Utah locations. Blowing dust pushed air-pollution measurements into the hazardous range. And temperatures plummeted 29 degrees between afternoon and evening.

The RealLifeProject via Flickr

Arctic winds spilling into northern Utah overnight are dissipating as they travel south to central Utah. But as the wind dies down, freezing temperatures continue.

Mike Siemen is a meteorologist with the national weather service in Salt Lake City. He says the easterly winds will continue into the evening, dying down around midnight, with wind-chill values expected to dip to -13 degrees.

“Tomorrow looks dry, not nearly as windy, but still quite cold with temperatures struggling to make it to the 20 degree mark along the Wasatch Front,” Siemen says.

Don Sharaf / American Avalanche Institute

Jim Steenburgh began probing the deep questions about the Greatest Snow on Earth since he settled in Utah after college.

A University of Utah researcher is taking pictures of snowflakes in a way that’s never been done before and the results could help forecasters better predict the weather.

If you’ve ever seen a picture of a snowflake it probably looked a lot like the paper cut-outs made every winter by thousands of first and second graders across the country: unique, but perfectly symmetrical and flat. But according to Tim Garrett, an atmospheric science professor at the U who helped develop a new way to photograph snowflakes, that image is a lie.

Utah Democrats call for increased education funding, the Utah House passes a bill that makes legislator pay more transparent, and Governor Gary Herbert declares today Fred Korematsu day.

Winter weather causes chaos on Utah’s roads, a top leader of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints tells missionaries to stop spreading rumors, and Utah’s birth rate continues to fall.