prescription drugs

Tim Slover

The kit contains information on symptoms of abuse; prevention tips for parents, healthcare workers, and law enforcement officials; as well as a list of substance abuse treatment centers in Ogden, and places where prescription drugs may be dropped off. Jenny Johnson is the injury prevention coordinator for the Utah

Department of Health. She says Ogden is a natural place for the toolkit to target.

Law enforcement officer from local and federal agencies are meeting in Salt Lake this week to share strategies for preventing crime.

The Violent Crimes Conference is a gathering of more than 200 law enforcement professionals including representatives from the FBI, West Valley police and Unified Police departments.  There they will share case studies and best practices.  Detective Matt Evans is the conference director.  He says one crime in particular is increasing along the Wasatch Front.

Whittney Evans

Law enforcement agencies in Salt Lake County seized 31 pounds of heroin in a series of busts from February through July of this year.   But cracking down on the drug trade is complicated and could have some negative consequences.

Officials say the demand for heroin in Utah is a public health crisis. Drug cartels operating from Mexico are bringing significant volumes of the drug into the state. The latest series of busts led to 21 arrests accompanied by charges that range from distribution and racketeering to money laundering.

Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in Utah and around the country. But Utahns can reduce the risk of overdose deaths and help protect the environment by disposing of those unused medications Saturday during National Take-Back Day.

The Utah House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that is intended to assist people who call for emergency help when someone is overdosing on drugs.

Amelia Sorich died of an overdose of heroin and cocaine even though two friends might have saved her life by calling for help. But the friends chose not to because they feared being prosecuted the drugs in their possession. Holladay Democratic Rep. Carol Spackman Moss says there are too many cases just like that. She crafted a bill to grant limited immunity to Good Samaritans who find themselves in a position to help.

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  A bill that could make it harder to sell fake or stolen prescription drugs passed the U.S. House of Representatives this week.   Utah 4th District Congressman Jim Matheson is a co-sponsor of HR 1919, which would require a product identifier code on every container of prescription drugs sold in the United States.  Matheson says technology is readily available to track them.