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National Park Service

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Interior Department is increasing fees at the most popular national parks to $35 per vehicle, backing down from an earlier plan that would have forced visitors to pay $70 per vehicle to visit the Grand Canyon, Yosemite and other iconic parks.

National Park Service

They felt like the Interior Department had snubbed their valuable work, so most members of the National Park System Advisory Board resigned last week.

A Sixth National Park Could Be Established in Utah

Dec 6, 2017
Bureau of Land Management

Utah Rep. Chris Stewart is proposing that oil and gas royalties be allocated to the National Park Service.  It’s his answer to funding existing as well as new parks, including his bid to create a sixth national park in Utah.          

Judy Fahys/KUER

Brooke and Randy Levin are money people. They know about investments and cash flow. He handles finances at a physical therapy company in Atlanta. She does real estate deals. They know about the parks’ money problems. And at the Arches National Park visitors center, they share some ideas, like ranger-guided tours.

Forecasted Thunderstorms Pose Wildfire Threat

Jun 28, 2016
iStockphoto.com - Cameron Gull

Fire officials say thunderstorms forecasted for southern Utah pose a wildfire threat. 

Dan Bammes

  A national environmental group is raising concerns about proposed plans to upgrade mobile phone service in Yellowstone National Park. 

The group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility argues there’s just no need for high-speed mobile service at Yellowstone.  Executive Director Jeff Ruch says the Park Service shouldn’t have to pay for the kind of infrastructure needed for streaming movies.

Parks, Communities Lost Millions During Shutdown

Mar 3, 2014
Dan Bammes

  The Interior Department issues a report every year on the economic benefit of national parks.  This year, that was complicated by the government shutdown that closed the parks for 16 days in October.

The report from the National Park Service estimates parks and gateway communities lost more than 400-million dollars in visitor spending during the 16-day government shutdown.

Dan Bammes

As the clock ticks down on a possible shutdown of the federal government, Utah’s tourist industry is already hearing from worried visitors.  

Visitors to Utah’s five national parks could encounter locked gates if the government shuts down because Congress can’t agree on a funding bill.  Marian DeLay, the head of the Moab Travel Council, says foreign tourists in particular are telling Moab businesses they don’t want to get to Utah and find the parks closed.