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climate change

The effects of climate change are already being felt at the headwaters of the West’s most important river system, according to a study released earlier this year.

The Rocky Mountain Climate Organization compiled the latest science on climate change in the Colorado River headwaters in a report titled Climate Change in the Headwater: Water and Snow Impacts (PDF), presented to the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments in February.

The National Park Service has released a report on how sea level rise could impact its sites. The publication was delayed by about a year, and as we’ve reported, there were concerns over possible censorship in earlier drafts.

Maria Caffrey worked for years with the National Park Service researching and writing the report, only to wait for months for its actual release.

A new study from NASA reinforces the idea that droughts are getting worse and could become more frequent in the Western U.S.

The culprit is human-caused climate change.

Democrats on Capitol Hill are calling for an investigation into the National Park Service, pointing to a report they say follows a "pattern" of censoring scientists who study climate change. So I checked in with the scientist who wrote the latest report and is now worried about her future.

The dry and arid climate of the Western U.S. is marching eastward, thanks to climate change.

That’s the conclusion of a set of studies from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Institute. 


A new Gallup poll shows the majority of Americans do believe in climate change. The poll shows 66% of Americans believe that most scientists think global warming is occurring, 64% believe it is caused by human activities, and 60% believe its effects have already begun.

Screenshot/The Carbon Tax Center

A trio of lawmakers from both parties proposed a bill that would have made Utah the first state in the nation to enact a carbon tax.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

Climate change may be a slow-moving threat, but a measure to recognize it shot through the Utah House Monday in flash, in minutes and without controversy.

Courtesy: Elizabeth Hansen

High-school students have been pushing Utah lawmakers for climate action in Utah for more than a year. And, on Thursday, a legislative panel voted to advance a climate-change resolution they helped to draft.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

It sounded sometimes like Rep. Ray Ward, R-Bountiful, was teaching a Climate Change 101 workshop on Tuesday. He asked members of the House Natural Resources, Agriculture and Environment Committee to focus on a few trends.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

Last year was the third hottest ever recorded in Utah, according to new data from the National Weather Service.

Andrea Smardon

When President Donald Trump said he would pull the U.S. out of the Paris Climate Accord in June, Stacy Palen decided it was time to step out of the classroom and into the political arena. 

Natural Resources Defense Council

Extremely hot days aren’t just uncomfortable. They’re unhealthy too. And the number of them is growing – nationally and in Utah – according to a new report by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

Judy Fahys / The Salt Lake Tribune

U.S. Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, spoke Thursday about the importance of protecting the environment. One of only a few high-profile Republicans who’s addressed climate change, the 4th District Congresswoman talked about her family’s love of camping and enjoying Utah natural amenities at the Snowbird Resort, where around for 300 people gathered at the Outdoor Recreation Summit for northern Utah.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

Newspapers are reporting this week that some federal-government scientists worry the Trump administration will suppress their latest climate change update. Other reports say scientists in the U.S. Department of Agriculture have been warned to stop using the term “climate change.”

Judy Fahys / KUER News

President Trump’s decision Thursday to exit and possibly renegotiate the Paris Accord is getting mixed reviews in Utah.

ffennema / iStockphoto.com

Many Utah gardeners were caught off guard last week when frost burned tomato plants they’d just put in the ground. But a new scientific paper from the University of Utah helps explain why that unexpected frost really isn’t so surprising.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

Utahns joined marchers around the world Saturday for what was called “The People’s Climate March.” They gathered outside Salt Lake City’s downtown library.

“We refuse to give up,” Piper Christian told the crowd.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

A Utah House panel killed a resolution on climate change Monday. But supporters were pleased despite its defeat.

Saro17 via www.istockphoto.com

Moab officials say they have taken a major step toward creating a more sustainable city. 

Judy Fahys / KUER News

Last year was the warmest on record globally. And, while Salt Lake City had a hot one too, it wasn’t a record breaker.

Sundance Film Festival

Thousands of people have descended on Park City for the Sundance Film Festival, which opened Thursday, and political undertones abound in the films showcased this year.   

zhengzaishuru / istockphoto.com

Environmentalists have launched a new campaign against climate change. They’re trying to slow oil and gas development on public lands just as the energy industry is trying to get the federal government to step it up.

The Uintah Basin Energy Summit takes place this week, and the controversy’s started even before the program begins. That’s because Wednesday’s keynote speech is being given by prominent climate change denier, Marc Morano.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

Rhode Island Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse has given 144 speeches on the floor of the U.S. Senate about addressing climate change.

David White/University of Utah

Someone trying to guess how good the skiing will be in the Wasatch next season will often ask: “How wet will it be?”

Judy Fahys/KUER

Climate-change activists scored a moral victory last week when the University of Utah’s Academic Senate voted to shed fossil-fuel investments, but now they’re impatient to see the policy advance.

Image courtesy University of Utah

The idea’s been debated at the U for several years: that it’s time to stop investing in companies selling the products behind the rapid changes in global climate. On Tuesday, The University of Utah’s Academic Senate joined more than 500 organizations worldwide in pressing university leaders to divest from fossil-fuel companies.

Judy Fahys/KUER

What would happen to life in the West if the water flowing into streams and reservoirs shrinks by a quarter of what we've come to expect?

Community leaders announced a new coalition Wednesday to deal with climate change. The Utah Climate Action Network is focused on mainstreaming the reality of climate change, avoiding the risks it poses and sharing practical solutions to its impacts.

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