antibiotics

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  Some of the turkeys raised for your Thanksgiving dinner can resist common infections – and that’s helped scientists at Brigham Young University to a discovery that could lead to new treatments for disease in people. 

Turkeys raised on poultry farms are susceptible to an infection called synovitis that causes pain in the joints.  But BYU microbiology Professor Rich Robison says some turkeys don’t get it, thanks to a unique strain of a germ called staphylococcus epidermidis.

Researchers at the University of Utah have found that doctors are prescribing antibiotics when people don’t really need them, a practice that may cause long-term problems.

Researchers say that when patients take antibiotics, the “good” bacteria living in the body is killed, which can cause side effects like rashes and diarrhea. Andrew Pavia, a professor of pediatrics at the U. who contributed to the study, says that’s only one consequence.