Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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Middle East
11:00 am
Wed February 15, 2012

The Growing Conflict Over Iran's Nuclear Program

Israel blames Iran for attacks in the capital cities of India, Georgia and Thailand, further escalating Israeli-Iranian tensions. Washington Post columnist Jackson Diehl believes that Iranian leaders are exhibiting signs of desperation.

NPR Story
11:59 am
Tue February 14, 2012

'Un-Fair' Anti-Racism Ads Draw Mixed Reactions

One of the posters from the Un-Fair Campaign's anti-racism effort. Click to see more.
Un-FairCampaign.org

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 12:00 pm

In January, a group of residents in Duluth, Minn., launched an anti-racism effort called the Un-Fair Campaign. They created ads, posters and billboards aimed to raise awareness about racial injustice and asking white people to recognize institutional racism.

The posters have prompted thoughtful discussion in some circles and backlash in others.

The organizers are also planning other events — a series of discussion, speeches and films, around the city.

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NPR Story
11:42 am
Tue February 14, 2012

Writers Explore The Meaning Of 'Black Cool'

Writer Rebecca Walker set out to create a "periodic table of Black Cool."
Amanda Marsalis

'Cool' is a word that has come to mean so much more than just a temperature. It can be an attitude, a style or a sound. The word continues to evolve and has a variety of meanings.

In a new collection of essays, Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness, writers explore the definition of coolness within African-American culture. Writer Rebecca Walker edited the book and compiled a series of essays aimed to build a "periodic table of Black Cool, element by element," to explain the myriad meanings of blackness in the United States today.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 14, 2012

Caregivers Press For Experimental Alzheimer's Drug

Originally published on Wed February 15, 2012 9:41 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

A recent study finds that a drug approved by the FDA to treat skin cancer in humans has reversed signs of Alzheimer's in mice and improvements showed up quickly. Neuroscientist Gary Landreth, one of the co-authors of the study, described that on TALK OF THE NATION: SCIENCE FRIDAY last week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Health Care
11:00 am
Tue February 14, 2012

Catholics Split On Health Care And Contraceptives

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Last Friday, President Obama came up a compromise: Catholic and other religious institutions would not have to provide contraception coverage for their employees directly, but the wider goal of women's health would be met because their insurance companies would have to do it.

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From Our Listeners
11:00 am
Tue February 14, 2012

Letters: Resume Tips And Welcoming Veterans Home

Originally published on Wed February 15, 2012 9:41 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Law
11:00 am
Mon February 13, 2012

Is The U.S. Constitution An International Model?

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 1:19 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Last month, Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg told a television interviewer in Egypt that she would not look to the U.S. Constitution as a model if she were drafting one today.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS BROADCAST)

JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG: Why not take advantage of what there is elsewhere in the world? I'm a very strong believer in listening and learning from others.

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Remembrances
11:00 am
Mon February 13, 2012

What We Can Learn From Whitney Houston's Life

Grammy Award-winning pop diva Whitney Houston died Saturday at the age of 48. Her voice inspired a generation of musicians. Houston's musical director and friend Michael Baker and bass player Matthew Garrison, who played on Houston's 2009-2010 final tour, share memories.

Education
11:00 am
Mon February 13, 2012

Income, More Than Race, Is Driving Achievement Gap

The achievement gap between black and white students has narrowed significantly over the past 50 years. The gulf between rich and poor students, however, has widened dramatically. Several studies suggest that family income serves as a better predictor of school success.

Opinion
11:00 am
Mon February 13, 2012

Op-Ed: U.S. Should Use 'Tough Love' In Syria

In an op-ed in The Washington Post, Georgetown professor Daniel Byman says U.S. policy focuses too much on removing the dictator and not on filling the void left behind. He says that to help in Syria, the U.S. and its allies should train the rebels and use "tough love to cajole and reward the opposition."

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Valentine's Day Special: Look Of Love

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 11:58 am

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

And now it's time for the Video Pick of the Week, and Flora's here. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, John.

DANKOSKY: So what do you have for us?

LICHTMAN: This week, we have a Valentine's Day special, getting ready for next week's Valentine's Day, in case you didn't remember.

DANKOSKY: How romantic.

LICHTMAN: Yes, of course, always on SCIENCE FRIDAY.

DANKOSKY: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Notes From A Former 'Guitar Zero'

NYU psychology professor Gary Marcus took up guitar at the relatively ancient age of 38, by starting with the video game Guitar Hero. Marcus shares his experiences and insights on the science of learning, which he's gathered in a new book Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Why Vinyl Sounds Better Than CD, Or Not

According to Rolling Stone magazine, sales of vinyl albums continue to grow, setting a new record in 2010. Does vinyl reproduce sound better, or is it just a trend? Two audio experts join guest host John Dankosky to talk about the science of audio, and how perceptions can shape the sound experience.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Drug Rapidly Counters Effects of Alzheimer's In Mice

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 11:58 am

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky, sitting in for Ira Flatow. Scientists have long been studied amyloid beta, those sticky protein fragments that build up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. What you may not know is that amyloid beta is produced in everyone's brain, including my brain as I speak to you right now.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

The Science Of Yoga: The Risks And The Rewards

In his book The Science of Yoga: The Risks and the Rewards, New York Times science writer and long-time yoga practitioner William Broad investigates popular health claims about yoga--that it boosts metabolism, for example--and finds that scientific studies tell a different story.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Next Supercontinent Could Form At The North Pole

Several times in earth's history continents have collided to form supercontinents only to later break apart. Geologist Ross Mitchell discusses a new study in Nature that predicts in 50 to 200 million years time the Americas and Eurasia will collide to form a supercontinent over the Arctic.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

What's The Truth About The War In Afghanistan?

Lt. Col. Daniel Davis ignited a controversy when he wrote that what he saw in Afghanistan "bore no resemblance to rosy official statements by U.S. military leaders." U.S. Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Ma), defense analyst Tom Donnelly and McClatchy Newspapers correspondent Johnathan Landay discuss the realities of the war in Afghanistan.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Occupy Wall Street: The Future And History, So Far

On September 17, 2011, hundreds of people gathered in Lower Manhattan to protest the growing wealth gap and Wall Street's involvement in the economic crisis. Five months later, most of the Occupy encampments across the country have been disbanded and the future of the movement remains uncertain.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Music Magazine Spins Reviews To Twitter

SPIN Magazine is hoping to review 1,500 albums and mixtapes exclusively in 140-character tweets on the SPINReviews Twitter feed in 2012. The music magazine recently abandoned their 80-word reviews for the new Twitter format, which critics think is killing the art of the music review.

History
10:19 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Historian Seeks Artifacts From Lincoln's Last Days

This drawing of Abraham Lincoln by editorial cartoonist Thomas Nast was published in Harper's Magazine in 1865.
Courtesy Harper's Magazine

Historian Noah Andre Trudeau is known for uncovering secrets of the Civil War. His previous books, Bloody Roads South and Gettysburg, have unveiled information about Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's march to the sea in 1864, and the legacy of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Now, in preparation for a book about a largely unexamined period of President Abraham Lincoln's life, Trudeau is in search of witnesses.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Wed February 8, 2012

Three Takes On What Defines Conservatism In 2012

The remaining GOP presidential candidates, Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, New Gingrich and Ron Paul, are all fighting to sell a slightly different brand of conservatism. The definition of what it means to be conservative has changed over the years.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Wed February 8, 2012

Redefining The Grieving Process In The Digital Age

After a loved one dies, it's becoming more common to offer and receive condolences through a Facebook post or an email. New York Times contributor Bruce Feiler discusses the new customs that are evolving to guide the grieving process in the digital age.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Wed February 8, 2012

�" Obama Shifts His Position On Super PACs

President Barack Obama's campaign has urged top donors to support a super PAC run by former Obama aides. The president previously called the fundraising groups a "threat to democracy." The Center for Responsive Politics' Sheila Krumholz discusses the shift and NPR's Ken Rudin reviews the week in politics.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Wed February 8, 2012

Keeping Your Resume Out Of Online 'Oblivion'

Many mid- and large-sized companies rely on computerized systems to scan resumes and narrow the field of job candidates. Some tracking software may overlook qualified applicants who haven't used the right keywords. The Wall Street Journal's Lauren Weber explains what it takes to get noticed.

Iraq
11:00 am
Tue February 7, 2012

As Iraq Veterans Return, How Do We Welcome Them?

St. Louis, Mo. held a parade for veterans of the Iraq War in January 2012 that drew an estimated 20,000 participants and 100,000 spectators. Fifteen other cities are considering similar parades, but some argue that such celebrations should not be held while the war in Afghanistan continues.

Around the Nation
11:00 am
Tue February 7, 2012

Correcting Common Misconceptions About Air Travel

The claims airline passengers make about flights are often embellished. During turbulence, for example, passengers may think a plane is dropping hundreds of feet, when it's never typically more than 20. Airline pilot Patrick Smith, writes the Ask The Pilot column for Salon.com. He sets the record straight on common air travel myths.

Around the Nation
11:00 am
Tue February 7, 2012

The Next Step For California's Gay Marriage Ban

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals declared California's same-sex marriage ban, known as Proposition 8, unconstitutional on Tuesday. This paves the way for a U.S. Supreme Court case that could have far-reaching implications for gay marriage around the country.

Medical Treatments
11:00 am
Tue February 7, 2012

One Woman's Experience As A Clinical Trial 'Lab Rat'

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 12:53 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Late last summer, Mary Elizabeth Williams got some devastating news: her cancer had returned. A year after recovering from malignant melanoma on her scalp, it had resurfaced, this time in her lungs and back. News can't get much worse than that, but then Williams learned that the FDA had recently approved clinical trials for first new melanoma drug in decades. She qualified for the trial several months ago and has been writing about her experiences for Salon. Mary Elizabeth Williams joins us in a moment.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Mon February 6, 2012

The World's 'Responsibility To Protect'

After the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, world leaders vowed that such mass atrocities could never be allowed to happen again. In 2005, the U.N. adopted the Responsibility to Protect, a set of principles to guide the response of the international community if a government fails to protect its population.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Mon February 6, 2012

Op-Ed: Komen Foundation Needs A New Approach

The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation reversed its controversial decision to stop providing funding to Planned Parenthood. Rodger Jones, an editorial writer for the Dallas Morning Star, says that to retain the support of abortion rights opponents, Komen needs to consider different fundraising options.

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