Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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Health
11:00 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Partnerships Help Drugmakers Get Closer To Patients

Proteus Biomedical has developed chip-in-a-pill technology that transmits patient data directly to a smartphone. Novartis has partnered with Proteus to investigate applications of this technology. C&EN senior editor Rick Mullin discusses how the nontraditional partnership is part of a larger trend.

Science
11:00 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Michael Mann, From The Trenches Of The 'Climate War'

In his book The Hockey Stick And The Climate Wars, Michael Mann discusses what he calls a well-funded campaign to discredit climate change. He describes efforts by opponents with ties to the fossil fuel industry to harass climate scientists and create doubt about climate change.

Science
11:00 am
Fri March 2, 2012

'Galileo' Lives In A New Production

Originally published on Fri March 2, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Up next, an old play that's even more relevant today. An off-Broadway production of the play "Galileo" - Bertolt Brecht - just opened here in New York. It stars F. Murray Abraham in the title role. Brecht wrote the play in 1938. That's more than 70 years ago. I saw the play this week. And I'm no theater critic, but the message and the theme of the play about a Renaissance-era astronomer written by a Cold War-era playwright, it feels like it could have been written last week.

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NPR Story
11:52 am
Thu March 1, 2012

'Beautiful Souls': Unlikely Resisters Inspired To Stand

Beautiful Souls explores why four brave individuals choose to stand up for what's right.
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

In Beautiful Souls: Saying No, Breaking Ranks, And Heeding The Voice of Conscience In Dark Times, journalist Eyal Press writes about "unexceptional people who took great risks" to help others.

The book profiles four individuals — a Serbian solider, a financial whistle blower, a Swiss police officer and an Israeli soldier — all unlikely resisters who end up going to great lengths to challenge authority.

Press talks with NPR's John Donvan about the things that inspire ordinary people to take a stand.

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Author Interviews
11:50 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Trading The Road Of Anger For The Path To 'Patience'

In Patience, meditation instructor Allan Lokos says peacefulness is an art that you can practice, develop and build.
Tarcher

Patience is a virtue that can be hard to recover when you're trapped in rush-hour traffic or stuck in a long line at the bank.

In Patience: The Art of Peaceful Living, Allan Lokos explains the importance of abandoning anger and unhappiness and walking the path to patience.

Lokos, founder and guiding teacher at The Community Meditation Center in New York, talks with NPR's John Donvan about how to master the art of patience.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Data Mining: Does Online Privacy Matter?

Google combined more than 60 privacy policies in order to streamline the information that it collects about its users. Google says it hopes to create a "beautifully simple, intuitive user experience across Google." Critics say the new policy digs deeper into users' lives.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Duz Prawper Speling Mader NeMor?

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

When we speak to one another, word order counts. For example, I'm speaking to you right now in pretty conventional word order - subject before verb before object. But what if I took what I just said and I moved the words around like this: For example, now speaking pretty, I'm conventional, verb, object before, and now you order before subject to word. Maybe you followed that. But is the concept really different when it comes to spelling? Recently, a debate broke out between Wired columnist Anne Trubek and Lee Simmons, a copy editor there.

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Remembrances
12:27 pm
Wed February 29, 2012

Remembering Monkees' Singer Davy Jones

Singer Davy Jones, of The Monkees, died Wednesday at the age of 66. A spokesman for the singer said he died of a heart attack. NPR's John Donvan remembers the pop star who sang lead in hits like "Daydream Believer."

Economy
11:00 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Op-Ed: Gas Prices Are Not A Political Issue

Industry analysts say oil prices rose ten dollars a gallon in February, driving up gas prices at the pump. Washington Post columnist Charles Lane argues that though gas prices have long been a political issue, gas prices are largely determined by global crude oil prices.

Politics
11:00 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Game-Changing Debate Moments

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 12:34 pm

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm John Donvan in Washington. Snowe steps down, Obama rallies the base, and nothing holds Romney back. It is Wednesday and time for a...

MITT ROMNEY: Deceptive and a dirty trick...

DONVAN: Edition of the political junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER: Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.

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On Aging
11:00 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Caretaking: When Love And Resentment Collide

Writer Sandra Tsing Loh loves her 91-year-old father. As he lost his independence, she began caring for him and has encountered frustration that many children of aging baby boomers may face. In a piece in The Atlantic, she confesses that there are moments when she wishes he would die.

Afghanistan
11:00 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Koran Burnings Complicate U.S. Role In Afghanistan

After U.S. military officers in Afghanistan accidentally burned Qurans while disposing of other Islamic texts, two American military officers were killed and protests broke out throughout the country. The violent responses have raised concerns about the U.S. strategy.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

The Hidden Faces Of Modern Day Slavery

Slavery continues to exist across the United States in a number of forms. There are brothels, farms, nail salons and factories across the United States where people are working against their will, for no pay. A number of states are working on legislation to address human trafficking.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Not Enough Hours In The Day?: How To Find More Time

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 2:22 pm

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

Free time, so how much of that do you have? Are you, say, too busy to breathe? Well, author Laura Vanderkam says that she used to be too busy to breathe until she figured out that most of us who don't think we have time to spare in a day are really only fooling ourselves, maybe even lying to ourselves. She says you're not that busy. Hmm. Are you? If you're convinced that you really are that busy, give us a call, maybe Laura can help you out and convince you otherwise.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

In-Laws And Interracial Marriage

According to a study by the Pew Research Center, about 15 percent of new marriages in 2010 were between people of different races or ethnicities — nearly twice the rate from 30 years prior. Though interracial marriage is more mainstream, the unions may still cause tension among family members.

Food
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Chef Trotter Transitions From Kitchen To Classroom

Chef Charlie Trotter helped pioneer American fine dining at a time when French cuisine reigned on the food scene. After 25 years, Trotter will close his namesake restaurant — Charlie Trotter's — in Chicago, Ill., to pursue a Master's in philosophy and political theory.

From Our Listeners
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Letters: Va.'s Proposed Ultrasound Law, 'Rez Life'

NPR's John Donvan reads from listener comments on previous show topics including Virginia's proposed ultrasound law, preparing your pockets for a rainy day and reservation life.

Health Care
12:05 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

'Am I My Genes?': Fate, Family And Genetic Testing

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 12:13 pm

Advances in genetic testing have improved the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of disease. But having increased information about your genetic makeup can raise some difficult questions and decisions.

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Education
11:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Affirmative Action: Is It Still Necessary?

In a 2003 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to uphold affirmative action and said it expected that in 25 years, "the use of racial preferences will no longer be necessary." The court will hear a case involving race-conscious admissions at the University of Texas in the fall.

Opinion
11:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Op-Ed: It Seems Easier to Raise A Kid Alone

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

And now, The Opinion Page. Jessica Olien has neither a husband nor a child, but she would eventually like to have one without the other - meaning she wants to be a mom, but she does not want to be a wife. She intends when she has a child to raise it on her own, as her mother raised her without a man around. Her piece titled "I Want to be My Child's Only Parent" ran in the online magazine Slate. It was in response to new numbers that show that more than half of the children born to women under 30 are now born to single mothers.

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Africa
11:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

The World's Options For Aid In Somalia

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

The Somali Civil War that began in 1991 destroyed the country's agriculture; that led to widespread starvation and poverty, thousands of people died, warlords took over clans. The United States and other countries tried to help, but all efforts have failed. Now 20 years have gone by. And with piracy and the threat of terrorism from the group al-Shabab becoming a global problem, the British government held a summit last week in London with 55 delegations from Somalia and the international community.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Mild Winter May Be Keeping Flu Bugs At Bay

Flu season usually peaks around February. But this year it's missing in action, with the CDC reporting the slowest start to the flu season on record. Peter Palese, a microbiologist at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses whether unseasonably warm winter weather may be to thank.

Technology
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Weaving Around Web Privacy Controls

Web browser manufactures often market their products to consumers with an emphasis on privacy, assuring users that their products can better control how personal information is used online. Carnegie Mellon privacy researcher Lorrie Cranor explains that many companies have developed quiet ways to step around some of that privacy-protecting code.

Space
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Imagining A More Active Moon

The standard picture of the moon is of a long-dead object, geologically speaking. But using observations from cameras on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Thomas Watters and colleagues say in the journal Nature Geosciencesthat there are signs of more recent tectonic activity on the moon, within the last 50 million years.

Science
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Secret Life Of Ice

Photographer and videographer Edward Aites, of Seattle, submitted this time-lapse video to Science Friday. He looked at ice through a macro lens and cross-polarizing filters, and found a colorful, surprising landscape. This is ice like you've never seen it before.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Genetic Test Reveals Unexpected Data

Bloomberg News reporter John Lauerman volunteered to have his DNA sequenced by Harvard researchers to demystify the process for the public. What he didn't expect to uncover was that he possessed two gene variants--one linked to rare blood disorders and the other to a higher risk of Alzheimer's.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Powering Up...With A Microbial Fuel Cell

Reporting in Environmental Science and Technology, researchers write of harvesting electricity from microbe-rich river sediments--enough to power a small LED bulb. Grant Burgess, a marine biotechnologist at Newcastle University, discusses the hunt for electron-burping bugs.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Science Diction: The Origin Of 'Tuberculosis'

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 12:12 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: The alphabet has only 26 letters. With these 26 magic symbols, however, millions of words are written every day.

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

And that music means it's time for Science Diction, where we talk about the origins of science words with my guest, Howard Markel, professor of the history of medicine at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, also director of the Center for the History of Medicine there. Welcome back to SCIENCE FRIDAY, Howard.

DR. HOWARD MARKEL: Hi, Ira, how are you?

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Oscar's Top Documentaries
11:55 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Wembers Creates 3D Tribute To Choreographer 'Pina'

Director Wim Wenders spent a year working with 3-D experts in preparation for the film.
Donata Wenders

Director Wim Wenders created the 3-D documentary "Pina," in tribute to German choreographer Pina Bausch. When the two met over 20 years ago, they started planning a film that would capture her unique style of modern dance. Bausch died of lunch cancer just days before filming started.

Religion
11:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

The Dialogue Around Gay Marriage In Black Churches

A bill that could legalize same-sex marriage has cleared the Maryland House and is expected to pass in the Senate. A majority of black clergy in the state argue that same-sex marriage conflicts with the teachings of the Bible, but some pastors have spoken out in support of the bill.

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