Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Obama Affirms Support Of Same-Sex Marriage

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:59 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Will Same-Sex Marriage Swing The Swing States?

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 1:11 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. It's official: Gary Johnson lands the Libertarian presidential nomination. Former standard-bearer Ron Paul picks up GOP delegates. And Democrats wonder about the pace of evolution. It's Wednesday and time for a...

VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: Absolutely comfortable...

CONAN: Edition of the political junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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NPR Story
11:59 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Iraq's Oil Boom And The Global Market

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:59 am
Wed May 9, 2012

The Unintended Consequences Of Libya's Revolution

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 2:14 pm

The fall of Colonel Moammar Gadhafi's regime in Libya was hailed as one of the great successes of the Arab Spring. More than six months later, attacks continue on the prime minister's compound and well-armed mercenary fighters and stockpiles of weapons have made their way into Sub-Saharan Africa.

Strange News
12:35 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

The Secret Life Of The Other Alan Feuer

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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From Our Listeners
12:32 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Letters: 'Zuul The Terrordog' And New Graduates

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments about previous shows including living with cancer, mainstreaming special education kids, and advice for new graduates. And "Zuul the Terrordog" sings along to the Talk of the Nation theme.

NPR Story
12:14 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Henry Louis Gates Jr.: A Life Spent Tracing Roots

Henry Louis Gates Jr. is also the author of The Signifying Monkey, which won the American Book Award.
Joseph Sinnott

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 10:07 am

For more than 30 years, Henry Louis Gates Jr. has been an influential public intellectual with a distinct style, who makes complex academic concepts accessible to a wider audience.

Gates — known widely as "Skip" — may be best known for his research tracing the family and genetic history of famous African-Americans. "There are just so many stories that are buried on family trees," Gates tells host Neal Conan. "My goal is to get everybody in America to do their family tree."

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Your Money
12:14 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

'Sandwich Generation' Must Make Tough Choices

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:01 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the past few weeks, our colleagues at MORNING EDITION have been telling a series of stories called "Family Matters," about the challenges that over 50 million of we Americans now face: multigenerational households, homes where two or more generations of adults live under one roof.

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National Security
12:14 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Busted Bomb Plot Advanced Underwear Scheme

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 12:30 pm

FBI bomb experts continue to study the device involved in the latest al-Qaida plot to bring down a U.S.-bound airliner. U.S. officials say the explosive is a more advanced version of the underwear bomb that malfunctioned aboard a jet in 2009.

Religion
12:41 pm
Mon May 7, 2012

When Religious Leaders Lose Their Faith

Teresa MacBain was pastor of a United Methodist church. In March, she made a confession: She is now an atheist. MacBain, NPR religion correspondent Barbara Bradley Hagerty and Jerry DeWitt, executive director of Recovering from Religion talk about how losing faith changes lives and communities.

Opinion
12:23 pm
Mon May 7, 2012

Op-Ed: Obama Should Endorse Gay Marriage

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The president and gay marriage on The Opinion Page this week. Yesterday on NBC's "Meet the Press," David Gregory asked Vice President Joe Biden whether he was comfortable with same-sex marriage now.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "MEET THE PRESS")

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Europe
12:19 pm
Mon May 7, 2012

Greek, French Voters Hope For Fresh Start

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
12:03 pm
Mon May 7, 2012

What Putin's Latest Election Says About Russia

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 12:37 pm

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Energy
11:26 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Is Thorium A Magic Bullet For Our Energy Problems?

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. What if there was a nuclear reactor that was meltdown safe, generated power inexpensively, created no weapons-grade byproducts and burnt up existing nuclear waste stockpiled? Sound too good to be true?

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Science
11:23 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Cracking The Egg Sprinkler Mystery

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Up now, our Video Pick of the Week. Flora Lichtman is with us. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: What have you got for us this week?

LICHTMAN: This week is an experiment that anyone can do at home. You just need permission from your housemates.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LICHTMAN: So here's what you do: Go to the refrigerator, get out some milk, and then pour a puddle of it on your countertop or your kitchen table. Then take a hard-boiled egg and spin it in that puddle.

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Technology
11:14 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Gazing Into The Cloud, From Storage to Servers

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

One of the newer buzzwords coming out - buzz phrase, actually, has to do with the working in the cloud. Do you work in the cloud? Do you ever hear about it? You store your files, your movies, your music, maybe your office documents, even your word processor can be up there in the Cloud. What's this all about? Do you want to get involved? Are you wondering whether you should do that? That's what we're going to be talking about for the rest of the hour with two folks who write about technology and think about how it works.

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Antidote For Cocaine Overdose Shows Promise

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Stroke, kidney failure, seizures are some of the devastating effects of a cocaine overdose that kill thousands of people each year. But new research has created hope that a cocaine overdose antidote may soon be available for doctors who administer in emergency situations.

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Actress Mayim Bialik On TV, Science, And The Combo

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Depending on how old you are, you may know my next guest as the girl who played the young Bette Midler in "Beaches" or as the star of the '90s sit-down "Blossom," sitcom "Blossom" or as Amy Farrah Fowler, Sheldon Cooper's sort-of girlfriend on "The Big Bang Theory." Or maybe you know her as all three.

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Gauging Public Opinion on Climate Change Policy

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

'Be Richer' By Learning From Parents' Mistakes

Money — how to make it, and what to do with it when you have it — can be problematic for recent graduates.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 9:29 am

College seniors graduating in 2012 face a sluggish economy, bleak job prospects and a mountain of student loan debt. To make matters worse, many don't have the first clue about how to manage their personal finances.

Author Zac Bissonnette, a recent college graduate himself, learned how to handle money by watching his parents' mistakes and ignoring most of their advice. He put himself through college without loans, scholarships or help from his parents.

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Around the Nation
11:12 am
Thu May 3, 2012

What's So Compelling About Skyscrapers

Rising above the Manhattan skyline: 1 World Trade Center.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 11:56 am

After the terrorist attacks that brought down the twin towers in Manhattan, many said it was the end of an era for skyscrapers. New York City proved them wrong. The building constructed to replace the towers, 1 World Trade Center, has risen above 1,250 feet and surpassed the Empire State Building as the tallest in New York.

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Around the Nation
11:12 am
Thu May 3, 2012

OWS: A Case Study In Social Movements

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 12:16 pm

On May Day, the Occupy Wall Street movement re-emerged to try to reestablish its message and place in the national conversation. Thousands marched in New York City, Oakland and other cities, then quickly faded from national view. Guests consider what sustains social movements, and why some fail.

On Aging
11:12 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Confronting Your Crown: Male Pattern Baldness

"Macho types are inspired by the likes of Jason Statham," pictured here, writes Daniel Jones.
Max Nash AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 8:33 am

Men dealing with male pattern baldness have decisions to make — go with a comb over, take medication, get hair plugs or a toupee, or do nothing at all.

When New York Times contributing editor Daniel Jones started losing his hair, he chose what he considers a "cooler alternative" — head shaving.

"Losing your hair," he tells NPR's Neal Conan, "is a little bit like a girlfriend who's sort of drifting away, and you're clinging to her as she goes off and sees other people. ... It gets worse and worse. So it's better to take some sort of pre-emptive move."

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Children's Health
12:53 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

What's Lost When Kids Don't Ride Bikes To School

As childhood obesity rates continue to rise, schools and parents look for ways to get kids off the couch. But the number of students who walk or ride their bikes to school has dropped from 48% in 1969 to just 13% in 2009. David Darlington talks about his Bicycling article, "Why Johnny Can't Ride."

Education
12:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

The Ten Things You Won't Hear At Commencement

Elmira College graduates gather at their 2010 commencement.
Elmira College Flickr

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 9:35 am

Every spring, new graduates sit through commencement addresses full of advice to seize the day, dream big and make the world a better place.

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Education
12:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

The Best Ways To Integrate Special Needs Students

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 12:50 pm

Budget cuts in many school districts have some parents and teachers questioning whether they have the resources to support their students. NPR education correspondent Claudio Sanchez and Thomas Hehir of Harvard University talk about how to integrate special needs students into mainstream classrooms.

Politics
12:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Rubio, Ryan, Portman, Christie: Who Will Be VP?

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 12:23 pm

Mitt Romney, the presumed GOP presidential candidate, continues to try out potential running mates, though most deny any interest in the job. Sen. Marco Rubio, Rep. Paul Ryan, Sen. Rob Portman, Gov. Chris Christie and others have all made high-profile comments in recent days.

National Security
12:31 pm
Tue May 1, 2012

John Brennan Delivers Speech On Drone Ethics

In the first formal acknowledgement of what's been an open secret, White House Counter Terrorism adviser John Brennan publicly stated that the U.S. conducts drone strikes targeted on al-Qaida. In a speech at the Woodrow Wilson Center, Brennan opened many doors on drone strikes.

Around the Nation
12:31 pm
Tue May 1, 2012

'Gal Sports Reporter' Past Shakes Up Newsroom

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

In a piece in last month's Chicago Tribune, reporter Bonnie Miller Rubin described a message from an earlier self, a copy of the Davenport Times Democrat from 1973 that introduced her as that paper's first gal on the sports desk, complete with a photo of her in a short skirt jogging alongside the track team from a local college. In a column, her then-editor wrote: Please, no special treatment for her just because she's a member of the fairer sex. She joins us in a moment.

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NPR Story
12:30 pm
Tue May 1, 2012

'Debulked Woman': Ovarian Cancer's Grim Reality

Susan Gubar is a professor emeritus of English at Indiana University, Bloomington, and co-editor of The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women.
Donald Gray

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 8:55 am

Feminist literary scholar Susan Gubar was diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer in November 2008. She then began her emigration "from the world of the healthy to the domain of the ill," she writes in her book, Memoir of a Debulked Woman.

Ovarian cancer often goes undetected until it has spread throughout the abdomen, and is typically fatal. To slow the spread of the disease, Gubar underwent a procedure known as the mother of all surgeries — a radical debulking operation in which her ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, appendix and parts of her intestine were removed.

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