Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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Architecture
12:07 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

Tall Buildings, A Cut Above The Rest

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:49 pm

A pair of Canadian skyscrapers have been dubbed the "Marilyn Monroe" towers due to their shapely form. In Abu Dhabi, twin towers are shielded from the sun by computer-controlled shading screens. Architect Antony Wood discusses features of some tall buildings that make them standouts across the world.

Space
11:40 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Voyager 1 Bids Farewell to the Solar System

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:49 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Thirty-five years ago, NASA launched a pair of spacecraft called Voyager 1 and 2 in hopes of learning more about the outer planets of solar system, those big gas giants. The Voyagers beamed back dazzling close-ups of the big red spot on Jupiter and the rings of Saturn, but scientists wanted to see even more of what's out there, see how far the Voyagers could go before running out of fuel.

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Space
11:36 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Will China Blast Past America In Space?

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:49 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Last week, China launched its Shenzhou spacecraft into orbit, carrying three taikonauts, one of whom was a woman, China's first female astronaut. A few days later, the spaceship crept up on the Tiangong space lab in orbit and docked with it, making China one of only three countries to have pulled off such a feat after the U.S. and the Soviet Union.

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NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Field Trip! Can You Stomach It?

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 11:55 am

Philadelphia's Mütter Museum has a lot of heart, and other organs too. Items in this collection of medical specimens include a gangrenous hand, a wallet made of human flesh, and a colon the size of a medium suitcase. And that's just the stuff on display, imagine what's in the basement.

NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Can 3D Printers Reshape The World?

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:49 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. What if you broke your doorknob, or you needed a spare part for your car, and instead of going to a store or your car dealership, you just powered-up your desktop 3-D printer, and hours later, voila, you've got the part you needed.

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NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri June 22, 2012

More To The Universe Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:49 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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Law
12:32 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Why Operation Fast And Furious Failed

The operation was run by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in 2009-10. NPR's Ted Robbins and Michel Marizco of the Fronteras Desk talk about the intent of Fast and Furious, why the operation failed, and solutions to curb gun-running on the U.S.-Mexican border.

Movie Interviews
12:29 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

'Call Me Kuchu': Uganda's Secret Gay Community

One of the front page stories published by Ugandan newspaper The Rolling Stone, which terrorized the LGBT community.
Katherine Fairfax Wright Courtesy of 'Call Me Kuchu'

When Ugandan lawmakers introduced an anti-homosexuality bill in 2009, it called for the death penalty for "serial offenders." That legislation failed, but a new version was reintroduced in 2012 in an effort to further criminalize same-sex relations in a country where homosexuality is already illegal. The bills have drawn loud and widespread condemnation from much of the international community, particularly after the brutal death of openly gay activist Davdi Kato.

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Law
12:24 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

The Grim Realities Of Life In Supermax Prisons

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the past 25 years, the number and percentage of prisoners held in isolation has exploded at both state and federal penitentiaries. At a Senate subcommittee hearing this, Senator Richard Durbin argued that the dramatic expansion of the use of solitary confinement is a human rights issue we can't ignore.

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Race
12:01 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Betwixt And Between: Studying Multiracial Identity

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 12:34 pm

In 1989, Reginald Daniel began teaching a university course on multiracial identity called Betwixt and Between. It remains the longest-running college course addressing the multiracial experience. For his continuing studies and research on multiraciality, Daniel received the Loving Prize.

Law
1:21 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

Deciding Whether Defendants Should Take The Stand

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The defense in the Jerry Sandusky trial rested today without calling the former Penn State assistant football coach to testify, perhaps because he did not help his cause in media interviews after charges surfaced last November. Here's part of his interview with Bob Costas on NBC.

(SOUNDBITE OF INTERVIEW)

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Movie Interviews
12:32 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

'Revisionaries' Tells Story Of Texas Textbook Battle

Don McLeroy has served on the Texas State Board of Education for more than a decade.
Silver Lining Film Group

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 7:39 am

Controversy erupted in 2009 when the Texas State Board of Education debated changes to the state's textbooks that centered on the teaching of evolution.

The Revisionaries documents the Board of Education's contentious battle, focusing in large part on Don McLeroy — a young-earth creationist and, at the time, chairman of the Texas Board of Education. The film is being screend at the American Film Institute's Silverdocs Film Festival.

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Politics
12:17 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

Obama's Shift On Immigration And The Latino Vote

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 2:22 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Forty years after Watergate, President Obama cites executive privilege. Rubio's out that he's in again, and after baseball phenom Bryce Harper leads off, Harry Reid hits second. It's Wednesday and time for a...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's a clown question, bro...

CONAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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Middle East
12:02 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

What's Ahead For Iran After 'Last Chance' Talks

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 1:20 pm

The latest round of high-level negotiations over Iran's nuclear ambitions ended Tuesday without an agreement. After the failure of talks that President Obama called Iran's "last chance," some wonder whether or not Israel or the United States may now opt for military force.

Art & Design
1:09 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

For One Counterfeiter, It's Art, Not A Crime

Hans-Jurgen Kuhl featured his face on bills as an announcement for an art show.
David Wolman

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 8:13 am

Hans-Jurgen Kuhl started painting when he was 10. He loved gazing at the artwork in Cologne's Ludwig Museum. As a young adult, he discovered silk-screening and soon made something of a name for himself producing Andy Warhol imitations.

Years later, frustrated by his meager living as an artist, he decided to imitate a more difficult but more immediately rewarding piece of art: the U.S. Treasury's $100 bill. Kuhl still considered it art, though the authorities used a different word when he manufactured hundreds of thousands of maybe the best counterfeit C-notes ever.

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From Our Listeners
12:55 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Letters: Genetic Tests And Parenting

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics including the challenges facing single parents, difficult choices raised by advances in genetic testing and the jokes that define a community or group.

NPR Story
12:12 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Secrecy Stifles Debate On Black Operations

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 6:38 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. For years, U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen remained an open secret. There are reasons why missile attacks on the territory of quasi-allies weren't acknowledged, but because of that secrecy, legal justification started to emerge only last year, and the process that the president and his advisors use to put individuals on the kill list only came into focus this month in Daniel Klaidman's book "Kill or Capture."

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NPR Story
12:12 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Despite Verdict, Many Still Find Clemens Guilty

A jury found Roger Clemens not guilty on all charges of obstruction and lying to Congress about steroid use. Clemens has always denied the accusations, but despite the verdict, many fans and sportswriters declared Clemens guilty long ago and refuse to believe he's innocent.

NPR Story
12:12 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Many Who Are Sexually Abused Keep Quiet

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 8:37 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last week on the first day of the sex abuse trial of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, a 28-year-old man referred to as Victim Four in court papers took the stand and offered graphic detail of years of abuse.

He also expressed regret for not coming forward earlier. He told the jury he had spent, quote, so many years burying this in the back of my head forever that when he heard there were other cases like his, he felt responsible.

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Europe
12:26 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

Personal Stories Behind Europe's Fiscal Instability

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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Architecture
12:19 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

The Ins And Outs Of Obama's Immigration Shift

The Obama administration estimates its new immigration enforcement policy will allow some 800,000 young illegal immigrants to avoid deportation and work legally in the U.S. Some critics say it oversteps executive authority, others say that it doesn't go far enough.

Race
12:15 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

The Lessons We Learned From Rodney King

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 2:06 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Two decades after his videotaped beating by four Los Angeles police officers, Rodney King died yesterday at the age of 47. His beating sparked outrage over police brutality. And after a jury acquitted the four police officers, that outrage erupted into riots that left some 55 dead; more than 1,000 injured; and more than $800 million in damage in the City of Los Angeles. King then posed the unanswerable question, can we all get along? which started new and sometimes painful conversations across the country.

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Middle East
12:14 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

Another Detour On Egypt's Path To Democracy

Even before votes were counted in Egypt's first competitive presidential election, military leaders effectively seized control of the country. The ruling military council granted itself broad powers over the government, including budget control, immunity from oversight and the power to declare war.

Interviews
11:44 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Desktop Diaries: Sylvia Earle

A moray eel, a flock of geese and a shrunken head are just a few of the things found in and around Her Deepness' office. Earle, an explorer-in-residence at the National Geographic, has desks all over the country. A few months ago we stopped by her Oakland home-base for the next installment in our Desktop Diaries series.

Science
11:37 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Neanderthals: The Oldest Cave Painters?

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a red disk painted in Spain's El Castillo cave is at least 40,800 years old--making it the oldest known European cave art. Archaeologist Alistair Pike discusses how his team dated the disk, and whether Neanderthals could have painted it.

World Health
11:32 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Virus Hunter Recalls Discovery Of Ebola And HIV

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. Imagine a cargo plane dropping you off in a remote corner of the African jungle. The area you've just entered is under quarantine for a mysterious plague. Nobody knows how many people it has killed, but all who have fallen sick die within eight days, first high fever, headache, hallucinations, then usually bleeding to death.

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Science
11:26 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Putting a Friendly Face on Statistics

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:24 am
Fri June 15, 2012

How The Morning-After Pill Works

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 12:12 pm

Mitt Romney referred to morning after-pills as 'abortive pills.' The FDA-approved label on Plan B indicates it may prevent fertilized eggs from implanting in a woman's uterus. Dr. Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson, an obstetrics and gynecology professor at Karolinska Institute, discusses the growing scientific evidence to the contrary.

NPR Story
11:24 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Mapping The Microbial Make-Up Of Healthy Humans

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 12:05 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

There are trillions of germs that live on us. What are they? What do they do? Inquiring minds want to know, and so they set to find out. And after five years of research, a group of several hundred scientists has released a census of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms that call our bodies home.

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NPR Story
11:24 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Bacterial Armor Imaged, Down To The Details

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 11:56 am

Reporting in Nature, an international team of scientists say they've visualized the structure of a protective protein coat that surrounds many bacteria, down to the scale of a single atom. Structural microbiologist Han Remaut, co-author of the study, discusses potential applications of the research.

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