Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

Local Host(s): 
Mike Anderson
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a64de1c85e3e649c2326|5182a647e1c85e3e649c231b

Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

Pages

Around the Nation
2:46 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

What The Penn State University Report Reveals

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Shocking and callous disregard for victims, repeatedly concealed critical facts, failure to protect the children created a dangerous situation for unsuspecting boys lured and victimized repeatedly.

Read more
Environment
12:11 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Finding Common Ground In Environmental Debates

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 2:51 pm

Conversations about the environment can often be polarizing. Jonathan Foley, director of the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment, says that rather than rehash the same old debates, environmental issues need to be reframed.

NPR Story
12:06 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Writer Puts Expendable 'Redshirts' In The Spotlight

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:08 am

Fans of Star Trek long ago noted that anonymous security officers who accompanied the show's stars rarely survived the experience. Shortly after being beamed down, they would be vaporized, stomped or eaten for dramatic effect. It's a plot device so common that these expendable crewmen became known collectively as redshirts.

In his novel Redshirts, science fiction writer John Scalzi follows Andrew Dahl, a similarly expendable ensign as he sorts out this life-expectancy issue.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:04 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Arson: The Motivation And Fire Investigation

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 2:48 pm

Investigators have yet to rule out arson as they continue to look for the cause of Colorado's Waldo Canyon fire, the most destructive wildfire in state history. Former FBI agent Brad Garrett and forensic psychologist N.G. Berrell talk about the process of investigating fires and the profile of an arsonist.

Africa
1:23 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Despite Grim Headlines, Africa Is Booming

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The news stories are not wrong: There is all too much drought, poverty, famine and war in Africa. But you will also find six of the world's 10 fastest-growing economies there. Malls, high-rises and Internet cafes are popping up in cities across the continent, and a new generation with more income, more global interests and more ambitions.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:36 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

What Happens When A City Declares Bankruptcy

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

San Bernardino is expected to become the third California city in the past month to file for bankruptcy. That follows Stockton and Mammoth Lakes. Even after layoffs and cuts to public employees' pay and pensions, officials in San Bernardino said the government could not cover upcoming bills. So what happens now to city services like police and fire protection, garbage collection, road repairs? Who gets paid, and who doesn't? If you have questions about municipal bankruptcy, give us a call, 800-989-8255.

Read more
Politics
12:34 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Political Junkie Roundup: Money And The NAACP

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The president pivots to taxes, Romney says he's just ducking the jobs number, and Palin pleads for partisan passion. It's Wednesday and time for a...

SARAH PALIN: Hair on fire...

CONAN: Edition of the political junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER: Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.

Read more
Television
12:11 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Finally, TV's 'Dolt' Dads Get To Evolve

In Modern Family, writes Hanna Rosin, dad Phil Dunphy, played by Ty Burrell, is "the center of joy and fun in his household."
Peter "Hopper" Stone ABC

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 1:02 pm

"Starting from the birth of sitcoms, fathers are pretty much universally morons," writes Hanna Rosin in a piece for Slate.com. The latest crop of sitcoms, though, showcases dads who are a stark contrast to the bumbling Stu Erwin, on The Trouble With Father, or Fred Flintstone, or even Homer Simpson, she adds.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:10 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Intense Heat Has Lasting Impact Across U.S.

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Heat in the summertime is usually not news, but this year is more than a little out of the ordinary. The first six months of 2012 is already on the books as the warmest half-year on record according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Read more
NPR Story
12:31 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Bad Book Review Sparks Fictional Friendship

Patrick Somerville set up a real email address for his character, Ben, who he describes as "kind of a wayfaring pothead version of Will Shortz."
Liv Friis-larsen iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 8:38 am

On July 2, The New York Times ran a review of author Patrick Somerville's book This Bright River. It was not a flattering assessment. Film and literary critic Janet Maslin described the starting point as "generic" and the destination as "soggy."

When Somerville read the review, he realized the whole thing hinged on a factual error: Maslin mixed up two characters from the very beginning, confusing which one got hit in the head.

Read more
Economy
12:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Downward Mobility A Modern Economic Reality

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:54 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last week's disappointing jobs numbers offer little hope of change anytime soon for the millions of long-term unemployed and underemployed Americans. For too many, this crisis has extended so long that cherished plans have been set aside and sights lowered: owning a home maybe, a college fund for the kids, family vacations.

Read more
Middle East
12:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Fighting In Syria Takes Harsh Human Toll

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:57 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
From Our Listeners
12:07 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Letters: Health Care Law And Extreme Anxiety

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:59 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments.

Read more
NPR Story
12:31 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Joy Harjo's 'Crazy Brave' Path To Finding Her Voice

Joy Harjo has won a Native American Music Award for Best Female Artist of the Year for her album Winding Through the Milky Way.
Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:51 pm

In her new memoir, Joy Harjo recounts how her early years — a difficult childhood with an alcoholic father and abusive stepfather, and the hardships of teen motherhood — caused her to suppress her artistic gifts and nearly brought her to her breaking point. "It was the spirit of poetry," she writes in Crazy Brave, "who reached out and found me as I stood there at the doorway between panic and love."

Read more
Around the Nation
11:59 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Storms Hurt Grid And Power Companies' Credibility

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:42 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. At the end of last month, a line of powerful storms left millions without electricity in the midst of record-breaking heat. The storms killed some as trees fell on houses and cars, then the heat took more lives as people sweltered without fans or air conditioning.

The heat wave's broken, the power's back on for most, but the widespread outages left many frustrated and angry. What took so long? Can't we protect power lines? And what about the crews who arrive to help out?

Read more
Opinion
11:59 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Op-Ed: Now's The Time For A Candid Candidate

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:42 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now, the Opinion Page. The ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes famously carried a lantern in daylight in hopes of finding an honest man. In an op-ed in Sunday's Washington Post, Kathleen Hall Jamieson embarked on an even more changeling quest: a search for an honest politician. Now more than ever, she wrote, with a public highly anxious about the economy and worn down after years of promises that things would get better, the time is ripe for a candid candidate.

Read more
Middle East
11:59 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Reporting From Yemen Amid Ongoing Drone Attacks

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:42 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Science
11:55 am
Fri July 6, 2012

At Long Last, The Higgs Particle... Maybe

This week physicists announced the discovery of the long-sought-after Higgs boson--or at least something that looks a lot like it. Theoretical physicist Sean Carroll explains why the tiny particle is so fundamental to our understanding of the universe, and why it took 50 years to find it.

Food
11:43 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Relishing The Science Of The BBQ

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Up next on our summer science issues that we'll continue. Joining me now is editor - multimedia editor Flora Lichtman. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: Hi there.

Read more
Books
11:38 am
Fri July 6, 2012

SciFri Book Club Talks Silent Spring

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

I hope you're having your cup of coffee, your beverage of choice, maybe a little snack, sitting in your comfy reading or driving chair, settled in now because the first meeting of the SCIENCE FRIDAY Book Club is about to go underway. And for our first book, we have chosen the Rachel Carson classic "Silent Spring."

Read more
Science
11:35 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Peering Into The Dark Side Of Scientific Discovery

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Now picture this: You're one of the many graduate students working round the clock in a university lab on a series of seemingly dead-end experiments, until one day, you strike gold. It turns out, you've discovered the cure to a mysterious disease which will save the lives of millions around the world.

Read more
NPR Story
11:23 am
Fri July 6, 2012

What's Your IQ On SPF?

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 11:48 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next up, in all this summer heat, what could be better than summer science? And if you're headed out to the town, to the beach, sailing, maybe going for a hike, my guess is you're probably taking along a bottle of sunscreen to protect yourself against that blazing summer sun. But do you know how sunscreen actually works, how it protects your skin from those UV rays? We sent our intern Eli Chen out to Times Square and Bryant Park here in New York to ask that question to a few people getting their rays.

Read more
Remembrances
9:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Woody Guthrie's Indelible Mark On American Culture

Woody Guthrie singing aboard a New York City subway train.
Eric Schaal Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 7:51 am

The summer of 2012 marks the centennial of the birth of American folk icon Woody Guthrie, on July 14, 1912. A poet of the people, Guthrie wrote some of America's most important songs, including "This Land Is Your Land." He penned ballads that captured the heart of hard economic times and war.

While Guthrie left a lasting mark on music, culture and politics, he struggled with family poverty, tragedies and personal demons.

Read more
Around the Nation
9:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Land-Grant Universities And Future Of Agriculture

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:55 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
9:46 am
Thu July 5, 2012

A Quarter-Century Of Memories Unfurl In AIDS Quilt

Visitors view the AIDS Memorial Quilt at the National Mall.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 6:49 am

Quilts hold a special place in American culture, reflecting pieces of our lives that are passed on from generation to generation. In 1987, a small group of people in San Francisco started a quilt to document the lives and stories of people who died from HIV/AIDS.

Twenty-five years and thousands of stops later, the AIDS Memorial Quilt returns to the National Mall for the first time in more than a decade. To date, more than 48,000 panels have been woven together to memorialize the lives lost to the pandemic.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:55 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Poll Shows A New Definition Of Optimism In America

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm John Donvan.

Read more
From Our Listeners
12:29 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Letters: Storytelling, Making Work Work

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments.

Read more
Fitness & Nutrition
12:24 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Debate Revived: Low-Carb Or Low-Fat Diet?

Is a calorie just a calorie? Science writer Gary Taubes says no. In a study published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, diet researchers reported that patients on a low-carb diet kept weight off longer than those on a low-fat diet, re-introducing a long-standing debate.

Politics
12:14 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

How History Colors Our View Of Presidents

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 3:06 pm

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm John Donvan in Washington. John Roberts plays the hero and the villain. Charlie Rangel may face a recount in New York. The attorney general is held in contempt, and Chris Christie has something spicy to say to a reporter. Stand by for it, it's Wednesday(ph) and time for a...

GOVERNOR CHRIS CHRISTIE: Are you stupid?

DONVAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

Read more
Books
11:30 am
Tue July 3, 2012

'Monkey Mind': When Debilitating Anxiety Takes Over

Author and journalist Daniel Smith teaches English at the College of New Rochelle in New York.
Tyler Maroney

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:18 am

There's a lot to be anxious about — an upcoming job interview, a first date or perhaps a big presentation at work. For some, anxiety can be much more than just sweaty palms and quivering hands. It can be a debilitating condition with severe physical and mental effects.

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimates that nearly 40 million American adults suffer from a wide range of anxiety disorders — from acute nervousness and increased heart rate to full-on panic attacks.

Read more

Pages