Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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Architecture
12:37 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

Want To Make A Creative City? Build Out, Not Up

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 1:31 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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From Our Listeners
12:37 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

Letters: Living With HIV And Violence In Your Town

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time read from your comments. Last week, after the mass murder in a Colorado movie theater, listeners wrote and called in to tell us the lessons they've learned after a dramatic attack in their town.

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Middle East
12:37 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

What Happens If And When Assad Falls In Syria

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 12:02 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The battle for Aleppo, Syria's largest city, continues into a second week. Rebels control more and more smaller towns, the defection of senior military officers and diplomats continues, all signs that the government's grip on power is slipping, and many analysts suspect that President Bashar al-Assad's fall is inevitable.

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Opinion
12:27 pm
Mon July 30, 2012

Op-Ed: Boomers, Give Up On Entitlements

Boomers, New York Times columnist Bill Keller has a message for you: It's time to bite the bullet and cut spending on Social Security and Medicare. In an op-ed, Keller writes, "It's not our fault that there are a lot of us, but we have resisted any move to fix the system."

Business
11:56 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Mixing Business With Beliefs

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 12:30 pm

Calls continue for boycotts of Chick-fil-A, while supporters are organizing a national "buycott." But Chick-fil-A is far from the only business to incorporate political or religious values into their business — or to stumble or jump into the culture wars in the process.

Education
11:56 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Ever-Growing Past Confounds History Teachers

The twin towers of the World Trade Center billow smoke after hijacked airliners crashed into them early 11 September, 2001.
Henny Ray Abrams AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 8:06 am

In college, study of American history is often broken down into two chunks. Professors pick a date to divide time in two: 1865, after the Civil War, say, or 1900, because it looks good. So for those who teach courses on the first half, their purview is fairly well defined.

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Law
11:56 am
Mon July 30, 2012

How Forensic Psychiatry Informs Trials

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 12:22 pm

James Holmes, the former neuroscience student accused of killing 12 people and injuring 58 others in the Colorado movie theater massacre, has been formally charged with 24 counts of murder. The case will likely involve questions about Holmes' psychiatric condition and competency to stand trial.

Science
11:56 am
Fri July 27, 2012

"Resilience" Looks At How Things Bounce Back

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow.

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

And I'm Flora Lichtman. In 2007, thousands of people in Mexico took to the streets, protesting the price of tortillas. In three months, the price of corn had gone up 400 percent. Why? According to my first guest, it all started with a spike in oil prices triggered by Hurricane Katrina. That led to increased demand for ethanol, and U.S. farmers who grow a lot of the corn that Mexicans eat planted less corn for eating and more corn to make ethanol.

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Research News
11:46 am
Fri July 27, 2012

Building Organs, On One Microchip At A Time

Bioengineers are developing microchips, about the size of a thumb, that can behave like human organs. Donald Ingber, director of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, discusses how the "organ-on-a-chip" works and why the technology could replace the animal model for drug testing.

Politics
11:43 am
Fri July 27, 2012

Why Science Is A Non-Issue In The Election...Again

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow.

A flurry of extreme weather events, including wildfires, heat waves and droughts may have convinced more Americans that the planet is warming. A poll by the Brookings Institute found that 62 percent of Americans now believe in global warming, and nearly half of them have cited warmer temperatures or change in weather patterns as the reason for their belief.

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Science
11:37 am
Fri July 27, 2012

Sally Ride, Pioneer

Transcript

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Science
11:31 am
Fri July 27, 2012

Ask An Astrophysicist

The universe is being pushed apart at a faster and faster rate. And the culprit? Dark energy. Astrophysicist Adam Riess shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for that discovery, and now's your chance to ask him about it--or anything else you've been wondering about the cosmos.

Sports
12:49 pm
Thu July 26, 2012

An Indie Rock Baseball Tribute: 'Ichiro's Theme'

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 2:45 pm

Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie is a lifelong Seattle Mariners fan, and such an Ichiro Suzuki devotee he wrote a song about the outfielder. Though he wrote it years ago, he decided this week — when Suzuki was traded to the New York Yankees — was the right time to release "Ichiro's Theme."

Sports
12:30 pm
Thu July 26, 2012

What To Watch For At The 2012 Olympic Games

A number of events got started even before the official opening, including men's and women's soccer. Already, the US women's team has claimed its first win. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman reports from London with a look at what to watch for at the 2012 Olympic Games.

Middle East
12:21 pm
Thu July 26, 2012

The Crisis In Syria, On A Human Level

Originally published on Sun July 29, 2012 7:20 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. We usually hear about the civil war in Syria from cell phone videos posted by anti-government activists to YouTube or government press releases from Damascus. Usually, those stories can't be verified because very few journalists have been allowed in.

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Around the Nation
12:07 pm
Thu July 26, 2012

From Enron To Penn State, How Cover-Ups Happen

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 12:38 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Sex abuse in the Catholic Church and at Penn State, accounting practices at Enron, the break-in at the Watergate, in each of those cases and many, many more, senior officials lied to protect an individual or an institution. And while we've all learned that the cover-up is worse than the crime, very human impulses can overcome ethics, one lie can lead to another, and a bad situation becomes much, much worse.

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Europe
12:07 pm
Thu July 26, 2012

A Minute-By-Minute Account Of the Norway Massacre

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 12:42 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

It may be months before we know the details of exactly what happened inside the movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, a week ago. But with the benefit of time, GQ correspondent Sean Flynn has given us new perspectives on the massacre in Norway, where Anders Breivik murdered 77 people and wounded many more almost exactly a year ago. After he set off a bomb outside government offices in downtown Oslo, Breivik shot dozens, mostly teenagers at a summer camp on an isolated island named Utoya.

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Economy
12:36 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

The Ripple Effect From Rising Food Prices

As drought and high temperatures continue to devastate much of the country's corn and soybean crops, the USDA reports that food prices will continue to rise at least into 2013. NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax and The Earth Policy Institute's Lester Brown discuss the rising cost of food.

Politics
12:14 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

The Tea Party's Texas Strategy For 2012

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. W will skip the GOP convention, the presidential rivals vie for the vet vote, and Romney lambasts White House leaks. It's Wednesday and time for a...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Contemptible...

CONAN: ...edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER: Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.

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Movie Interviews
12:10 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

Navajo Teens Make Tough Choices In 'Heartbreak'

Thomas Martinez stands in front of "The Wall," an inspirational collection of his accolades, at his father's house.
Anthony Thosh Collins

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 9:13 am

Like many high school students, Thomas Martinez and Tamara Hardy dreamed of leaving for college and finding their futures away from home. But both grew up on a Navajo reservation and were torn, between those aspirations and their strong ties to their poverty-stricken community.

Martinez struggles to balance the needs of his family with plans to run track in college. Hardy wants to earn an engineering degree away from home, yet like many Native parents, her mother and father are reluctant to see her leave.

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Around the Nation
12:10 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

Eagle Scouts Return Badges In Protest

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 12:30 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Last week, the Boy Scouts of America reaffirmed the longtime policy of excluding openly gay Scouts and a ban on openly gay and lesbian adults as leaders. The Supreme Court ruled that this private organization is within its rights to do so. While many praised the group for upholding its values, some who earned the badge of Eagle Scout decided to return those coveted badges in protest. We'd like to hear from Scouts in our audience.

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From Our Listeners
1:36 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Letters: Leaving Home And Making New Friends

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments. Last week, we spoke with Sally Koslow about the difficulties many young people experience as try to leave home and why the lack of jobs and enormous student loan debt can soon send them back to live with mom and dad. Chris Mall(ph) in Bradford, New Hampshire, responded: I don't know a single boomerang child who doesn't want to be self-sufficient. Ms. Koslow fails to recognize that young people are not letting opportunities pass by, he wrote. Those opportunities are no longer available.

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NPR Story
12:31 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

After Ryan White's Death, Elton John Took On AIDS

Elton John speaks at the International Aids Conference in Washington, D.C., on Monday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 11:05 am

During the 1980s, musician Elton John watched many of his friends and loved ones suffer and die from HIV and AIDS. Lost in a drug-fueled haze, he says, he did nothing to help people with the disease.

Then he met Ryan White, a teenage hemophiliac who was shunned by his community after contracting HIV. Ryan's struggle and eventual death marked a turning point for John. He entered rehab and became a vocal advocate for AIDS research, prevention and treatment, creating the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Researchers Renewing Focus On AIDS Cure

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:36 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Since the early years of the AIDS epidemic, talk of a cure became almost taboo. In the past few years, advances in prevention and treatment became increasingly effective. Now some researchers say it's time to shift focus and resources to finding a cure. So why now, what's changed, and how close are we? If you have questions about the search for a cure for HIV/AIDS, give us a call: 800-989-8255. Email us: talk@npr.org. You can join the conversation on our website as well. That's at npr.org.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Political Crisis Behind The Faltering Eurozone

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:36 pm

Spain's recession has deepened and Spanish borrowing rates are at the highest level since the euro was introduced in 1999. Walter Russell Mead of The American Interest and Steven Erlanger of the New York Times talk about the long-term political effects of the euro crisis.

NPR Story
12:01 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

A Case For Continued 'Forward Engagement'

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:36 pm

Now is not the time to pull back on military and foreign engagement, according to former Undersecretary of Defense Michele Flournoy. In Foreign Affairs, she argues that strategic military deployments abroad, a policy of "forward engagement," help preserve the United States' standing in the world.

Around the Nation
12:06 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

What Previous Massacres Teach Us About Aurora

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 1:10 pm

Events like the mass shooting that killed 12 people and wounded dozes more in Aurora, Colorado can remind survivors of past massacres about their experiences. Edward Smith, a reporter with the Denver Post at the time of the Columbine shooting, and callers talk about what's been learned.

Sports
12:06 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Putting Penn State's Punishment In Perspective

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 12:23 pm

Pointing to an "unprecedented failure" at the top levels of Penn State leadership, the NCAA announced wide-ranging sanctions against the football program. NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca talks about public reaction and what it could mean for the future of Penn State football.

Mental Health
12:06 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Cognitive Disability Complicates Search And Rescue

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 12:30 pm

People diagnosed with conditions including autism, Alzheimer's and dementia often wander. Dean King of Outside Magazine, Robert Koester of the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, and Dr. James Harris talk about why, and the challenges of search and rescue missions to find them.

Sports
12:06 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Hometowns Help Cheer Olympians To Victory

Sherone Simpson of Jamaica, Lauryn Williams of the U.S. and Veronica Campbell of Jamaica compete in the women's 100 meter final at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympic Games, the race in which Williams won her silver medal.
Andy Lyons Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:41 pm

Before the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, U.S. sprinter Lauryn Williams accepted that her father, who was suffering from leukemia, wouldn't be there to see her compete in the 100-meter dash. But when residents of her hometown in Rochester, Pa., heard about it, they raised enough money to send her father and several other family members to Athens.

"I was very surprised," Williams tells NPR's Neal Conan. "It was really a great experience just to see everyone rally together."

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