Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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NPR Story
11:43 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Weighing The Benefits Of Studying Abroad

Though many colleges and universities urge their students to study abroad, there is little research on the actual benefits.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:33 am

In our increasingly interconnected world and global economy, the opportunity to study abroad seems like a particularly valuable experience. College students are urged to take advantage of study abroad programs to expand horizons and gain enriching cross-cultural experiences.

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NPR Story
11:43 am
Thu August 9, 2012

The Media, National Security And Leaks

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 12:19 pm

Bipartisan legislation approved in late July by the Senate Intelligence Committee includes anti-leak provisions designed to curb disclosure of national security information. This legislation, and an ongoing FBI inquiry into U.S. intelligence leaks, have raised questions about the relationship between reporters and sources.

NPR Story
12:34 pm
Wed August 8, 2012

Facebook Refugee Unplugs From Social Media

In a piece for Salon.com, former Facebook employee Katherine Losse wrote about why it's so hard to take breaks from social media.
Courtesty of Katherine Losse

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 12:42 pm

Katherine Losse was Facebook's 51st employee. After earning a master's degree from Johns Hopkins University in 2005, she got a job as a Facebook customer service representative — tasked with answering questions like "What is a poke?" In the course of five years, she became the personal ghostwriter for founder Mark Zuckerberg.

"I witnessed over those five years this huge transformation in how we lead our lives," she tells NPR's Tom Gjelten.

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Around the Nation
12:04 pm
Wed August 8, 2012

Guns 101: What We Know And What We Don't

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 1:30 pm

The recent shootings in Oak Creek, Wis., and Aurora, Colo., have reignited the debate about guns and gun control in America. But beyond the talking points and heated exchanges lie real questions about guns ownership, regulation and use.

Technology
12:01 pm
Wed August 8, 2012

Online Harassment Gets Real For Female Gamers

According to the Entertainment Software Association, 47 percent of gamers are women. Women over 18 are considered one of the industry's fastest growing demographics.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 11:57 am

Taunting and trash-talking are a regular part of the culture for online video gamers. Opponents tease and threaten each other to complement the violent clashes between the game avatars.

In a piece for The New York Times, reporter Amy O'Leary describes a series of incidents with female gamers over the past six months that have sparked a debate about sexual harassment in the online gaming community.

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Politics
11:55 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Finding The Truth In Politics

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

TOM GJELTEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Tom Gjelten in Washington. Harry Reid says Mitt Romney doesn't pay taxes. Romney supporters are furious. The VP speculation builds, and the debate on welfare reform is back on center stage. It's Wednesday and time for an...

MITT ROMNEY: Obamaloney...

GJELTEN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

(MONTAGE OF ARCHIVAL RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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Health Care
1:40 pm
Tue August 7, 2012

Prognosis Worsens For Shortages In Primary Care

Transcript

TOM GJELTEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Tom Gjelten, in Washington, sitting in for Neal Conan. It's bad enough that a visit to the doctor's office can be expensive. Maybe you worry about the quality of care you'll receive. But that's not all. A common complaint these days is the length of time we have to wait before we see someone who can help us.

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World
1:40 pm
Tue August 7, 2012

From Politics To Punctuality: America's Surprises

Guidebooks help tourists plot journeys and choose which sights to see. The books also provide advice on dining norms, driving habits and punctuality.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:22 am

When visiting another country for the first time, you probably turn to a guidebook for travel information — recommendations for hotels, restaurants and sightseeing. First-time visitors to the U.S. turn to guidebooks for that information, and also for advice on navigating the complexities of American culture.

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Middle East
12:11 pm
Tue August 7, 2012

Sinai: The Heightened Threat Of A Lawless Region

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 7:44 am

Transcript

TOM GJELTEN, HOST:

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National Security
12:03 pm
Tue August 7, 2012

Is There A Role For Government In Cybersecurity?

The Cyber Security Act of 2012 failed in the Senate, despite growing alarm in the intelligence community about the vulnerabilities of the nation's infrastructure. The episode highlights a unique problem for politicians concerned about the balance between national security and federal regulation.

From Our Listeners
11:41 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Letters: Teaching Modern History, Mindfulness

NPR's Tom Gjelten reads from listener comments on several past programs, including teaching modern history, the role of violence in popular culture and how to use mindfulness to re-frame stressful situation.

Religion
11:38 am
Mon August 6, 2012

Oak Creek Tragedy Puts Sikh Community In Spotlight

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 2:18 pm

Questions remain about the motives of the shooter who led Sunday's deadly attack at a Sikh place of worship, known as a gurdwara, in Oak Creek, Wis. Authorities have identified Wade Michael Page as the shooter in the rampage that left six others dead.

Mental Health
11:38 am
Mon August 6, 2012

What We Know About Treating Brain Disorders

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 12:43 pm

The human brain contains around 100,000,000,000 nerve cells and research has given us insight into how they connect to form memories and control emotion. Much less is known about how the brain responds to injury or disease.

Space
11:38 am
Mon August 6, 2012

Curious About Curiosity: What We'll Learn From Mars

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 12:11 pm

The Mars Science Laboratory rover, named Curiosity, made a successful landing on the surface of the red planet, drawing shouts and cheers from the mission control staff at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. University of Redlands professor Tyler Nordgren explains what Curiosity may discover.

Space
12:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Planning For 'Curiosity' On Mars

If all goes according to plan, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, nicknamed 'Curiosity,' will touch down on the red planet this weekend following what NASA has called 'seven minutes of terror' during the descent. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca and John Grunsfeld, head of NASA's Science Directorate, give a preview of the mission and talk about what scientists hope to learn from the latest ambassador to Mars.

Technology
12:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Tech Giants Gear Up For Patent Battle

A court battle between Apple and Samsung is underway in California, with each side arguing over intricate patent and trademark claims covering how the companies' phones and tablets work, look, and feel. Robin Feldman, professor at the UC Hastings College of the Law, explains some of the key issues in the court case and how it might affect the technology industry.

Science
11:49 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Making Movies That Zoom Into Foreign Worlds

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

You're listening to SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. A little later in the program, we'll be talking about NASA's landing of its new probe, Curiosity, to the Martian surface. But with us now is Flora Lichtman with our Video Pick of the Week. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: This is a soothing...

(LAUGHTER)

FLATOW: I mean, I saw the video pick. It's so soothing, although it's on a topic that you wouldn't think is soothing at all.

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Environment
11:30 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Changing Views About A Changing Climate

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

What is the role of humans in climate change? "Call me a converted skeptic," physicist Richard Muller wrote in an Op-Ed in the New York Times this week, describing his analysis of data from the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project. Though Muller was once a notable skeptic regarding studies connecting human activity to climate change, he has now concluded that "humans are almost entirely the cause" of global warming.

NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri August 3, 2012

One Doc's Prescription For Hassle-Free Healthcare

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

Dr. Jay Parkinson envisions a future of more efficient, hassle-free healthcare--and it starts online. He says he and his colleagues at the New York City-based healthcare start-up Sherpaa can solve 70 percent of patients' problems via email, eliminating a trip to the doctor's office.

NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Spending The Holidays At A Toxic Waste Site

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

To avoid the crowds at Niagara Falls, why not sail the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, or ogle oil refineries in Port Arthur, Texas? In Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures In The World's Most Polluted Places, Andrew Blackwell describes traveling to the world's most contaminated destinations.

Movies
3:15 pm
Thu August 2, 2012

Summer Movies: Olympic Medal-Winning Favorites

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Is a film in development where the aged Russian gymnast is allowed to give Michael Phelps the medal that broke her record? How about "Bad News Badminton" or "Dream Team V"? Well, there's no way to know whether we're going to see the butterfly, shuttlecocks or slam dunks in 3D anytime soon, but in the grip of Olympic fever, we kick off our annual summer film festival with a celebration of Hollywood's past focus on the drama of the games. Our favorite film buff Murray Horwitz joins us in just a moment.

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NPR Story
12:33 pm
Thu August 2, 2012

Drive For Profit Wreaks 'Days Of Destruction'

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:19 pm

In his latest book, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Chris Hedges takes a look at the tensions that arise between profit, progress, technology and the pursuit of the American dream. Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, written with co-author Joe Sacco, critiques an economic system that they say abandons too many Americans.

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Mental Health
12:15 pm
Thu August 2, 2012

Mindfulness: Using Your Brain To Beat Stress

Ellen Langer is also the author of On Becoming an Artist: Reinventing Yourself Through Mindful Creativity.
Nancy Hemenway

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 7:58 am

When psychologist Ellen Langer asked participants at a seminar to talk about someone or something that just drove them nuts, one woman spoke about her husband always being late for breakfast — a minor, everyday annoyance that Langer suggested might be reframed: Focus on the gift of a few moments alone.

A small thing maybe, but over more than 30 years, Langer has conducted a series of ingenious experiments that show how small and seemingly simple changes in our lives can reduce stress and help us lead healthier, happier lives.

Read more
Pop Culture
12:11 pm
Thu August 2, 2012

After Aurora, Rethinking Violence In Pop Culture

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 3:15 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. After the most recent mass shooting took place in a movie theater, producer Harvey Weinstein proposed that Hollywood directors sit down and discuss the role of violence in their films. That's not to say that images of blood and bullets trigger violence in general or motivated the Aurora murders in particular; the fact is we don't know.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Wed August 1, 2012

'Ways Of Forgetting' Color Japan's Present Day

American bomber pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr. (center) stands with the ground crew of the bomber Enola Gay, which Tibbets flew in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Tinian island, Northern Marianas, August 1945.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 9:02 am

In 2003, in the run-up to the invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush argued that an occupation could work because history provided an example in a non-Christian, non-white, non-Western country: the United States' occupation of Japan during World War II.

He cited the work of historian John Dower, the pre-eminent scholar of postwar Japan, who promptly published an op-ed to protest a misuse of history. His work, he said, should have led President Bush to the opposite conclusion.

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Economy
12:10 pm
Wed August 1, 2012

One Job Seeker's Ruse To Check Out His Competition

Have you ever wondered who else is out there applying for the jobs you want?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 8:49 am

Eric Auld wants a full-time job. He completed a master's program in 2009 and has a part-time job as an adjunct lecturer, but that provides barely enough to cover the bills.

Read more
Sports
12:07 pm
Wed August 1, 2012

Throwing Games: Is It Strategy Or Cheating?

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 12:35 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Not using one's best efforts to win a match. Few Americans know much about the sport of badminton, but that rule will likely be the subject of a lot of discussion over the next few days. Today, badminton officials at the London Olympics disqualified eight players for tanking. Women's doubles teams from South Korea, Indonesia and China drew boos yesterday when it looked like they deliberately lost preliminary matches to engineer more congenial match-ups later in the tournament.

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Politics
12:06 pm
Wed August 1, 2012

The Best And Worst VP Candidates Of All Time

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 12:35 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The Texas Tea Party cruises to victory. Congress actually acts to avoid a shutdown, and former Veep Dick Cheney pans the Palin pick. It's Wednesday and time for a...

VICE PRESIDENT DICK CHENEY: A mistake.

CONAN: ...edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

Read more
Sports
1:09 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

Equestrian Events Charm Horse Lovers At Olympics

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Equestrian sports are getting more attention than usual at this year's Olympic Games. The queen's granddaughter, Zara Phillips, brought royalty to the stands for her Olympic debut. Prince Harry, Prince William and Kate Middleton watched Phillips help Britain's equestrian team win a silver medal in the jumping competition. Ann Romney, the wife of the Republican presidential candidate, is also at the games to watch her horse, Rafalca, compete in dressage, an event also known as horse ballet.

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Pop Culture
12:56 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

Who Makes Stuff Up, And Why They Do It

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The history of journalism is replete with sometimes celebrated figures who made stuff up: Janet Cooke, a rising star at the Washington Post, Stephen Glass at The New Republic and now Jonah Lehrer, who resigned his job yesterday as a staff writer at the New Yorker. And you may have heard Jonah Lehrer as a guest on several NPR programs.

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