Talk of the Nation on KUER 1

Mon - Thu, Noon - 2pm
Neal Conan, Monday - Thursday. Ira Flatow, Friday
Mike Anderson

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's midday news-talk show. Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and healthcare, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, June 10, 2013 11:00am
    The man who leaked details of two secret U.S. surveillance programs told The Guardian that he hopes to trigger a national debate about the NSA programs that gathered phone and Internet records. NPR's Neal Conan reads from a range of reaction to the leaks and the motives of the leaker.
  • Monday, June 3, 2013 11:00am
    Midnight dinner service will be canceled at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan in June. Officials say it's part of the drawdown process, and though it might not sound like a big deal, former U.S. Army paratrooper David Brown says Marines at Camp Leatherneck stand to lose more than just food.
  • Monday, May 20, 2013 11:00am
    Prominent women such as Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo's Marissa Mayer are proving that women are finding their place at the table. But in an op-ed for The New York Times, former programmer Ellen Ullman argues that women in the field today face "a new, more virile and virulent sexism."
  • Monday, May 6, 2013 11:00am
    Job seekers often rely on friends, family members and other connections to land jobs. Nancy DiTomaso, professor at Rutgers Business School, explains her research that shows that such seemingly harmless favoritism in networking is driving black unemployment in the U.S.
  • Monday, April 29, 2013 11:00am
    The Boston Police Department and cooperating law enforcement entities were praised for working together to track down suspects in the marathon bombings. Boston Globe columnist Joan Vennochi asks whether police could have done more in the months, weeks, and even hours before the explosions.

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NPR Story
11:49 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Microbes Benefit More Than Just The Gut

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:19 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

How 'Geography' Informs The Fate Of The World

In The Revenge of Geography, Robert Kaplan examines how borders, population and resources should inform our understanding of conflict zones.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 10:25 am

To understand many of the worlds triumphs, tragedies and conflicts, according to geopolitical analyst Robert Kaplan, look no further than a map.

In his book The Revenge of Geography, Kaplan argues that geography is not just important to understanding world affairs — it's central to understanding where we've been and where we're going.

Kaplan uses this framework to look ahead and speculate about how geography will inform the future development and relations of countries like the United States, China and Iran.

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Middle East
12:13 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Syrian Refugees Flood Into Neighboring Jordan

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 10:00 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

As the conflict in Syria rages on, an estimated 200,000 people have already fled to neighboring countries: to Turkey, Iraq, Lebanon and most of all to Jordan. Jordan's foreign minister, Nasser Judeh, says the country can't absorb anymore and that the 85,000 already there have strained Jordan's limited means. Those arrivals include most of the high-profile Syrian defectors, including former Prime Minister Riyad Hijab. All this raises serious questions about Syria-Jordan relations and broader Middle East politics.

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Middle East
12:09 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

The Attack In Libya, How The U.S. Should Respond

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 12:18 pm

After the attack that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans in Benghazi, Libya, President Barack Obama said yesterday that the United States would "work with the Libyan government to bring to justice" the people involved.

Economy
12:02 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Smiley, West: Poverty Is A Political Issue

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 12:22 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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Middle East
12:29 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Outrage Builds After U.S. Embassy Attacks

Ambassador Chris Stevens and four other Americans died Tuesday after a mob attacked the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya in protest of a film that mocks Islam. In Egypt, protesters stormed the U.S. embassy in Cairo. These attacks raise concerns about U.S. policy in the region.

NPR Story
12:03 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

The Turns Ahead On The Campaign Trail

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan at NPR West today. We'll bring you the latest on Libya and Egypt later this hour, after the death of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans in an attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi and an attack on the U.S. embassy in Cairo, where a mob took down the American flag.

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NPR Story
12:03 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

The Role For The U.S. In The South China Sea

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 12:35 pm

As tensions mount between China and several neighboring countries over control in the Asia-Pacific region, U.S. Sen. James Webb talks with NPR's Neal Conan about the role the United States can and should play in the growing disputes in the South China Sea.

NPR Story
12:03 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Christopher Hitchens' Widow On Loss And 'Mortality'

Christopher Hitchens with his wife, Carol Blue, during a trip to Romania in 1989.
Courtesy of Carol Blue

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 1:09 pm

For 18 months, while undergoing treatment for esophageal cancer, Christopher Hitchens chronicled his year of "living dyingly" in a series of essays for Vanity Fair. Those essays, as well as never-before published notes from the end of his life, are compiled in the posthumous book Mortality.

The columnist, author and avowed atheist died Dec. 15. Carol Blue, Hitchens' wife of 20 years, shares memories of her husband and moments from their final days together in the book's afterword.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Amish Beard-Cutting: An Attack Or A Hate Crime?

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 1:15 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Environment
12:06 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Arctic Sea Ice Melt Sets Record

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Every summer, some of the ice that covers the Arctic Ocean melts. Come mid-September, it begins to refreeze. Scientists began to monitor this cycle in the late 1970s, and this year, they saw less ice than ever before - a lot less ice. NPR science correspondent Richard Harris joins us here in Studio 3A. Richard, nice to have you on the program.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: Always a pleasure, Neal.

CONAN: And how big is this change?

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Middle East
12:03 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

What We Know About Iran's Nuclear Program

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:26 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. There are new questions about Iran's nuclear program after a report from the IAEA late last month. The U.N. inspectors expressed frustration with Iran's tactics. At one site, Parchin, they worry that what may be critical evidence is being destroyed. At another, Fordow, they found that Iran has doubled the number of centrifuges available to enrich uranium, and now there's a report that Iran ran computer models of atomic warhead explosions.

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NPR Story
11:29 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Letters: Doctors And Health, Heroes And Bystanders

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:29 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Subdued Reflection On 9/11 Anniversary

A flag sits atop one of the memorial panels at the World Trade Center site in New York City on Tuesday.
Chris Pedota-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 3:39 pm

On the morning of the eleventh anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, the sound of bagpipes pierced the air at the site of the World Trade Center memorial in New York City.

At the Pentagon, in New York and in Shanksville, Pa., thousands of Americans came together to remember those who were killed in the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

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NPR Story
11:29 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Corporal Punishment In Schools: Does It Work?

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. To many people, a teacher spanking a student for starting a fight or talking back in class might seem like a relic of distant times, but it's more common than you might think. Though the trend is down, as recently as six years ago, a quarter of a million students were spanked at school, and laws in 19 states allow corporal punishment.

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National Security
12:09 pm
Mon September 10, 2012

How 9/11 Changed How America Sees The World

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 1:51 pm

After the terror attacks on 9/11, a public opinion survey by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs showed widespread support for increased spending on national security and counterterrorism. A decade later, a new survey shows that "Americans have become increasingly selective about how and where to engage in the world."

Opinion
12:07 pm
Mon September 10, 2012

Op-ed: America Needs Strikes

Public school teachers in Chicago walked off the job Monday after failed contract negotiations with the city. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the strike "unnecessary." In a piece for CNN.com, Chris Rhomberg, sociology professor at Fordham University, argues that America would be better off with more strikes.

Economy
12:04 pm
Mon September 10, 2012

The Housing Market: Have We Finally Hit Bottom?

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 1:51 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. After five years of plunging prices and spiraling foreclosures, maybe, just maybe, the bubble's stopped bursting. Home prices are beginning to rebound in many parts of the country. Recent reports show fewer foreclosures in several hard-hit states.

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NPR Story
11:29 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Lessons For College Students From 'The Zombie War'

Max Brooks World War Z is required reading for freshmen at St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 1:26 pm

Several colleges and universities have adopted a common read program, where freshmen read the same book during the summer and discuss it once on campus.

Author Max Brooks' World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War is one of the less traditional books appearing on required reading lists. The book captures scenes from a global zombie apocalypse through a series of first-person accounts.

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Health
11:51 am
Fri September 7, 2012

The Secrets In A Cigarette

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. In a few days, my next guest will be in Florida. He's going there to testify against Big Tobacco in a lawsuit brought by a smoker with health problems. Oh, you didn't know that tobacco lawsuits like this are still going on today? You certainly don't hear a lot about them in the news. But some 8,000 more cases just like this one exist in Florida alone.

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Science
11:47 am
Fri September 7, 2012

The Importance of Strange Science

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Consider the shrew, a small harmless, nearly blind animal. If you were to find one scrambling across your kitchen floor, you might shriek or stomp on it. Shrews look a lot like mice. Or you could catch it and release it outside. But what if you ate the shrew, whole, instead? No, you don't debone it. You don't even chew it. You just hack the tail off and swallow it whole. Why? Well, for science, of course.

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Health
11:45 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Study May Link Pro Football, Brain Decline

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Football season is getting into full swing this week: tailgating parties, point spreads, Tim Tebow. But amid all the excitement of a new season comes an old and disturbing ghost. This week, a new study finds that pro football players may be more likely to die from various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's or ALS, more likely than the rest of us.

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Tracking Viruses From Animals To People

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 12:04 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

I'm Ira Flatow. This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. We're going to talk now about West Nile virus, it showed up in 48 states, reports in viruses in either people or birds or mosquitoes, and it's not exactly clear just why the virus is so widespread this year or why the state of Texas has been particularly hard-hit.

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Oregon Power Project Needs The Motion Of The Ocean

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:59 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Tour A Bat Cave

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Joining us now is Flora Lichtman, our multimedia editor, with our Video Pick this week.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: This week, Ira, we're going to the bat cave. Well...

FLATOW: I saw the movie, you know. So not that, not that, I know.

LICHTMAN: Exactly. Another bat cave.

FLATOW: Oh, shucks.

(LAUGHTER)

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Theater
12:28 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Turner Channels Molly Ivins In 'Red Hot Patriot'

Kathleen Turner stars as Molly Ivins in Red Hot Patriot.
Mark Garvin Arena Stage

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 9:04 am

Academy Award nominee and Golden Globe winner Kathleen Turner stars in the play Red Hot Patriot. In the one-woman show, Turner plays the sassy newspaper columnist Molly Ivins, whose liberal wit first drew attention during her coverage of the Texas Legislature in the 1970s.

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Election 2012
12:21 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Revised Platform Elicits Boos At DNC In Charlotte

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 6:34 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

A rare moment of dissention at the Democratic National Convention. After a routine adoption of the party platform on Tuesday, critics pointed out that the document omitted any mention of the word God and did not identify Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Then yesterday the chair of the platform committee, former Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, proposed amendments.

(SOUNDBITE OF CONVENTION)

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Fitness & Nutrition
12:13 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Exercise And Eat Well: How Doctors Dole Out Advice

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. We know the facts: More than one-third of U.S. adults and nearly one-fifth of American children are obese. Our doctors have the unhappy task to tell us to eat less, drink less and get more exercise, or else. But sometimes that conversation doesn't happen, and when it does, it's often not very productive.

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Business
12:09 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

New Standards May Change How Cars Are Made

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 6:56 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last week, the Obama administration just about doubled fuel efficiency standards. By 2025, cars and light trucks will have to average better than 54 miles a gallon. That's a goal that pleases environmental groups and carmakers.

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Fitness & Nutrition
12:35 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

What We Know, And Don't Know, About Organic Food

Many people buy and eat organic food because they believe it's more nutritious. A new study suggests that may not be the case. But with a vast number of influences and variables, from the ripeness of produce to the length of the studies, researchers note that more research is needed.

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