NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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The Sunday Conversation
3:15 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Nazi Hunter Dedicates Career To Pursuing Justice

Eli Rosenbaum's team has investigated and prosecuted more than 1700 Nazi cases.
Department of Justice

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

More than 65 years after World War II, many Nazis are living out their lives in quiet retirements. The crimes scenes are, for the most part, cold. But Eli Rosenbaum is hot on the trail. He and his team at the Justice Department are Nazi hunters. They track down Nazis who moved to the U.S. after the war, and deport them.

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Music Lists
3:15 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Cumbia: The Music That Moves Latin America

Dancers move to cumbia during a Carnival parade in Barranquilla, Colombia in Feb. 2012.
Luis Acosta AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 2:19 pm

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Commentary
3:12 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Mallomars: The Cookie Everyone Likes To Hoard

Mallomars

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 9:24 am

Mallomars turn 100 years old this month. Over the years, the chocolatey marshmallow treat has gathered a cultlike following. For those who have yet to discover Mallomars, take heed — you may soon have a new addiction.

It's Mallomar season right now, which may seem strange since Mallomars are commercially packaged cookies, not apples. But the round graham crackers topped with marshmallow and covered in dark chocolate are actually packaged seasonally.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:05 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Regardless Of The Answer, Stay Staid

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

On-air challenge: Each answer is a two-word phrase consisting of two homophones starting with the letter S. For example, given the clue "remained dignified," the answer would be, "stayed staid."

Last week's challenge: Name a brand of beer. Rearrange the letters to name an activity often associated with beer.

Answer: Tsingtao, toasting

Winner: Jacob Taber of New York, N.Y.

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Photography
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

What Happens When You Touch A Stranger

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Religion
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Giving Counsel For The President's Soul

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Every day, President Obama gets a daily brief, a confidential package of intelligence information. For the last six years, he has also been receiving something more like a morning devotional, which includes scripture, poetry and prayer. Joshua Dubois sends those inspirational notes. He's the former head of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, and he's also the author of a new book called "The President's Devotional." Joshua Dubois joins us in here in our Washington studios. Thanks for being here.

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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Paul Theroux Aims To Go Off The Beaten Southern Path

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For nearly 40 years, Paul Theroux has taken his readers to many corners of the world, from Cairo to Cape Town, London to Japan, Boston to Argentina. So it may be surprising that this novelist has yet to write about the American South. That is about to change.

PAUL THEROUX: I got in my car a year ago and went down South - South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi - then I went back, back to Alabama, back to Mississippi. I've made now five trips to the South.

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Music Interviews
2:36 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Ashley Monroe: Country Music Has Always 'Sliced Me In The Heart'

Ashley Monroe's latest album is Like a Rose.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

In country music, Ashley Monroe is still a new kid on the block — but the 27-year-old artist has already worked with the likes of Wanda Jackson, Jack White and Miranda Lambert, and has also found success writing for other artists, including Carrie Underwood. The singer says her tastes are eclectic, but country has always had an especially tight hold on her.

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Movie Interviews
2:31 am
Sun November 3, 2013

'Open Secret': When Everyone Knows Who Your 'Real' Mom Is, Except You

For the first 18 years of his life, Steve Lickteig thought Joanie Lickteig was his sister. Both are pictured here in 1969.
Courtesy Steve Lickteig

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:57 am

Steve Lickteig's life as he knew it was a lie. Lickteig thought he was the adopted son of a former World War II vet and his wife. Life was simple: They ran a farm in Kansas, went to mass at the local Catholic church and raised Steve and their eight biological children.

Lickteig wondered who his real parents were and thought he'd set out to find them someday. Then, when he turned 18, two of his best friends told him the truth: His adopted parents were actually his biological grandparents. The woman who he knew as his older sister was actually his mother.

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Around the Nation
2:30 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Run For Coroner, No Medical Training Necessary

In St. Lawrence County, N.Y., the position of coroner is still elected.
Sarah Harris NCPR

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

It's a windy Thursday afternoon in Ogdensburg, part of a sprawling rural county in northern New York.

The choir at the Episcopal Church is practicing, and Eric Warner is behind the piano. He's a former funeral director, an organist and a stay-at-home dad who raises Clydesdale horses.

He's hoping to become one of St. Lawrence County's four elected coroners — there are two open seats this year — and he's running as a Democrat.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Minnesota Reaches Out To Uninsured Latinos, Wherever They Are

Health workers know places like Karina Cardoso's beauty salon in St. Paul, Minn., are prime places share information about the state's new health insurance options.
Elizabeth Stawicki for NPR

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 10:18 am

Minnesota's new online health insurance marketplace, MNsure, has been open for about a month, but getting the word out to hard-to-reach populations is just ramping up.

Outreach efforts have been slow to start due to delays in training navigators and finalizing MNsure's contracts with organizations who provide one-on-one help.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Hungry For A Hidden Word

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:10 pm

On-air challenge: This week's puzzle involves brand names of foods at the grocery. If I asked you to take "Dole" (as in pineapples) and rearrange the letters to name an ore deposit, you would say "lode." What anagrams do each of the names conceal?

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NPR Story
6:00 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Baseball's Most Crucial Strategy

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's time now for sports, and can we really talk about anything besides baseball today? Game 3 of the World Series last night - the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Boston Red Sox in dramatic style to go up two games to one. That's the big story. Here to bring us the side plots, the footnotes, the scholarly literature, if you will, NPR's Mike Pesca. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Endnotes are all in vogue these days, Rachel.

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Author Interviews
6:00 am
Sun October 27, 2013

River Phoenix's Eccentric Upbringing, Tragic Death

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 1980s and early '90s produced a generation of talented male actors known for taking on complicated, sometimes even controversial roles. Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt, Ethan Hawke - they all went on to become huge stars. But the legend of one member of that generation stands out, despite his early death - River Phoenix. Here he is in a 1986 classic "Stand By Me."

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STAND BY ME")

WIL WEATON: (As Gordie) You want to be the Lone Ranger and the Cisco Kid - walk and talk and - Jesus, where'd you get this?

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Music Interviews
4:35 am
Sun October 27, 2013

From 'Crouching Tiger' To 'Secret Songs': Composer Tan Dun's Next Move

Chinese composer Tan Dun's latest work, Nu-Shu: The Secret Songs of Women, was inspred by an ancient language spoken in a remote area of Tan's home province of Hunan.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 11:24 am

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The Salt
3:56 am
Sun October 27, 2013

A Sweet And Sour History Of Our Obsession With Candy

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 8:47 am

Trick-or-treaters demand it. Dentists despise it. Pop musicians have sung odes to it.

Love it or hate it, candy is a cultural fixation — and it isn't going anywhere.

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Books News & Features
3:48 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Energetic, Intimate 'Letters' Reveal Private Leonard Bernstein

Composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein, shown here conducting the New York Philharmonic orchestra in 1963, was a legend in American music. Letters to and from Bernstein have been compiled into The Leonard Bernstein Letters, a new book edited by Nigel Simeone.
Express Newspapers Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 12:10 pm

Leonard Bernstein was a singular American genius. One of the great orchestra conductors of the 20th Century, he was also a composer of hit musicals like West Side Story, as well as symphonies and ballets. He was a teacher and television personality — his Young People's Concerts introduced generations of children to classical music.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun October 20, 2013

No Time To Be Bashful

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 10:16 am

This week we have a celebrity edition of the Puzzle. Comedian Paula Poundstone is taking on our challenge. Poundstone is also a regular panelist on NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me.

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NPR Story
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Through 'Smoke And Mirrors,' Brett Dennen Looks For Himself

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Longtime Mexico-U.S. Rivalry Heats Up With Race To World Cup

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's time now for sports, and it's been a crazy week for Mexico's soccer team. Struggling to make the World Cup, it looked like they were out of it for sure. And then, boom, they are back in the hunt, all thanks to their longtime rivals, the good old U.S. of A. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now from New York to talk more of this. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hey.

MARTIN: So, what happened?

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NPR Story
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Hillary Clinton Pays The Piper For London Parking Ticket

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was slapped with a $130 fine after parking illegally in London. Though most diplomats ignore such fees, Clinton ponied up the money (the amount was cut in half because it was paid within two weeks).

Sunday Puzzle
6:19 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Can You Pass This -TE ST-?

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is an insider's test. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the consecutive letters T-E-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end with -TE and the second word will start ST-. For example, given "sheer force," you would say "brute strength."

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NPR Story
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

The Blurry Tone Of 'Double Exposure'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Kelley Stoltz has been called the godfather of the hazy, washed out, poppy sound coming from the Bay Area. Host Rachel Martin talks with musician Kelley Stoltz about his new album, Double Exposure.

Sports
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Worst NFL Team Takes On The Best

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

The dismal Jacksonville Jaguars play the formidable Denver Broncos today, a match-up that makes for the biggest point spread ever and possibly the worst regular season NFL game in a long time. NPR's Mike Pesca joins host Rachel Martin and can talk of nothing else.

Music Interviews
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Scary Meets Catchy In Darkside's 'Psychic'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The band Darkside is made up of two men - two halves really. Dark, scary electronics and a funk, rhythmic guitar line. The electronic half is Nicholas Jaar. He got noticed as a laptop music prodigy when he was a student at Brown University. And up until a year or two ago, he mostly worked alone. Then, the other part of Darkside entered the picture - Dave Harrington, a composer and jazz bassist. Now, they've got this first album out together. It's called "Psychic." Nicholas Jaar explains why he chose a bass player as his guitarist.

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Parallels
5:11 am
Sun October 13, 2013

A Decade On, A Boy, A Ball And A West Bank Wall

A decade ago, Israel's separation barrier cut off Ishaq Amer's home from its Palestinian village.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:29 am

A little more than a decade ago, in an effort to improve security, Israel began building a physical barrier in and around the West Bank.

The Amer family is among the Palestinians whose lives were disrupted. The concrete wall and fence cut them off from their village. Their son was separated from his soccer buddies, the most important thing in the world to him at the time.

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It's All Politics
3:41 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Senate Gets A Dose Of Scolding With Its Morning Prayer

Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black has been using his morning prayer to express his displeasure with political gridlock.
Drew Angerer AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 1:21 pm

It's easy to tune out when the Senate goes through its morning rituals. The president pro tem calls the chamber to order; there's the Pledge of Allegiance. One morning could sound like any other.

Except for the past two weeks. Barry C. Black, the Senate chaplain, has been using his morning prayers to say exactly what he thinks is wrong with Washington lawmakers: "Remove from them that stubborn pride, which imagines itself to be above and beyond criticism."

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The Salt
3:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

(Cabbage) Heads Will Roll: How To Make A Food Network 'From Scratch'

According to journalist Allen Salkin, Emeril Lagasse initially opposed bringing Rachael Ray, pictured here in 2007, onto the Food Network – and, at first, Ray agreed with him. "You have this all wrong," she told executives, "I'm beer in a bottle; you guys are champagne."
Scott Gries Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Mario Batali, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray are just a few of the stars the Food Network helped create. But what the network gave, it could also take away.

In From Scratch, author Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the network's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people — Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen — who rose and fell along the way.

Salkin tells NPR's Rachel Martin that while the network was intended for cooks, it wasn't run by them.

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Parallels
3:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

For Myanmar's Kachin Rebels, Life Teeters Between War, Peace

Members of the Kachin Independence Army train at a refugee camp in northern Myanmar.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:04 pm

Despite progress in its transition to democracy, Myanmar has struggled to end all the ethnic insurgencies that have long divided the country.

Now the Kachin — the last of the insurgent groups that have been fighting the government — have signed a preliminary agreement that could end the conflict.

The agreement falls short of an actual cease-fire, but calls for both sides to work "to end all armed fighting."

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Author Interviews
9:01 am
Sun October 6, 2013

'Book Of Matt': An Alternative Motive Behind The Infamous Murder

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Fifteen years ago today, a young man named Matthew Shepard was beaten and tied to a fence outside Laramie, Wyo. He later died of those injuries. The two men convicted of his murder, Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson, were said to have been motivated by hate because Matthew was gay. The event drew national attention. President Bill Clinton condemned it as a hate crime.

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