NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Latin America
6:03 am
Sun March 23, 2014

1994 Colosio Assasination Was Start Of Mexico's Catastrophic Year

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 9:36 am

In late March of 1994, Mexico's leading presidential candidate was assassinated by a gunman. Conspiracy theories about his death still abound.

Sports
5:41 am
Sun March 23, 2014

New Test Improves Detection Of Performance-Enhancing Drugs

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 10:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
5:41 am
Sun March 23, 2014

The Upsetting Nature Of March Madness

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 9:36 am

It's March Madness — college basketball playoffs! NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Slate.com's Mike Pesca for his take on the week in sports.

Europe
11:10 am
Sun March 16, 2014

New York Ukrainians Worry About 'Evil' Happenings at Home

A woman walks past the Ukrainian National Federal Credit Union in the Ukrainian neighborhood in Manhattan's East Village. New York is home to tens of thousands of Ukrainian and Russian immigrants.
Kathy Willens AP

Yonkers, N.Y., is home to many Ukrainian immigrants and home to the Ukrainian Youth Center, which, despite its name, also has a full bar. It's where Rostyslaw Slabicky is glued to the news.

"The mood right now is extremely apprehensive," Slabicky says. "There's part that's fait accomplis, that Putin is basically doing what he wants and the entire world is basically standing by, not doing anything."

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Latin America
10:57 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Venezuela In Turmoil For Lack Of Flour, Milk And Diapers

People line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas, Venezuela.
LEO RAMIREZ AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 12:20 pm

Alvaro Villarueda starts his morning the same way every day — putting in a call to his friend who has a friend who works at a Caracas, Venezuela, supermarket.

Today, he's looking for sugar, and he's asking his friend if he knows if any shipments have arrived. As he talks on the phone, his wife Lisbeth Nello, is in the kitchen.

There are 10 mouths to feed every day in this family — five of them children. The two youngest are still in diapers.

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Middle East
8:58 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Saudi Aid Boost To Syrian Rebels Puts Jordan At Risk

Syrian refugees have flooded the Zaatari refugee camp, near the Jordanian border with Syria.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:55 am

For months, a military stalemate has defined the war in Syria. Now, a new strategy is emerging as Western allies and Gulf states step up support for rebels in southern Syria.

Along Jordan's northern border, Syrian rebels say they are unifying their fractious ranks, urged to unite by Western and Arab intelligence operatives who work in a covert command center in Jordan's capital.

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Digital Life
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Authors Tighten Up Their Stories For Twitter Fiction Festival

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Asia
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Tsunami's Ghosts Haunt Japanese Earthquake Survivors

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been a little more than three years since the biggest earthquake in Japan's history, a quake that caused an unforgettable tsunami that killed some 20,000 people.

But the earthquake also had quieter consequences that didn't make headlines. In the London Review of Books, Richard Lloyd Parry investigates a peculiar phenomenon revealed in the aftermath of the storm. His piece is called "Ghosts of the Tsunami."

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Digital Life
5:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Making Your Device Your Best Travel Companion

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Spring break is not far away. So, it's time to start planning that trip, if you haven't booked it already. This is when those smartphones and tablets come in handy, right? I mean, they are supposed to help us be more organized. It's not really working for me. On this week's Wingin' It, though, we're going to attempt to help you make best use of your digital devices when traveling.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Code Switch
8:57 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Black GOP Stars Rise In A Party That's Still Awkwardly White

With his outspoken conservative views, Dr. Ben Carson is a hit among Republicans. He spoke at the Conservative Political Action Conference last week.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 10:00 am

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul's straw poll victory at last week's Conservative Political Action Conference wasn't unexpected for the presidential contender. In third place, however, was a surprise finisher.

Dr. Ben Carson is one of a handful of black Republicans that conservatives are buzzing about this year. While the GOP has made strides in cultivating viable black candidates, the party still has difficulty resonating with black voters.

He may not have the rock-star status of top conservatives like Paul or Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, but Carson's following is growing.

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Art & Design
7:06 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Destroyed By Rockefellers, Mural Trespassed On Political Vision

After the Rockefeller Center mural was destroyed in 1934, Diego Rivera recreated this version, named Man, Controller of the Universe, which is on display at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. The story of the original mural's creation and destruction is the focus of a Mexican Cultural Institute exhibition in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy of Museo Frida Kahlo

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 10:00 am

When Mexican artist Diego Rivera was commissioned in 1932 to do a mural in the middle of Manhattan's Rockefeller Center, some might have wondered whether industrialist tycoon John D. Rockefeller Jr. knew what he was getting into.

In 1934, the legendary artist's work was chiseled off the wall.

Now, in Washington, D.C., the Mexican Cultural Institute has mounted a show that tells what happened to Rivera's mural.

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Music News
6:40 am
Sun March 9, 2014

After A Bitter Struggle, DSO Brings 'Joy' To The People Again

Like many regional orchestras, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra has struggled financially. But after a lot of work, it's set itself on solid footing and become a bright spot in a struggling city.
Courtesy DSO

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 7:55 am

Detroit's Orchestra Hall is one of the best symphony concert halls in the country. The acoustics are top-notch. The theater itself is grand. Important music is made there by some of the country's most talented classical musicians.

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Race
5:59 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Busting Stereotypes To Become A Prima Ballerina

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 10:00 am

Transcript

MISTY COPELAND: I'm Misty Copeland and I'm a soloist with American Ballet Theater.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And how many years have you been dancing, Misty?

COPELAND: I have now been dancing for I think it's about 17 or 18 years but professionally for 13.

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Music News
5:59 am
Sun March 9, 2014

John Denver's 'Country Roads,' Now Official In West Virginia

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 10:00 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TAKE ME HOME, COUNTRY ROADS")

JOHN DENVER: (Singing) Almost heaven, West Virginia, Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
5:59 am
Sun March 9, 2014

The Rebound, The Intersection Of Self-Containing Half Spaces

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 10:00 am

Did you miss the MIT conference on sports analytics? Slate's Mike Pesca tells NPR's Rachel Martin about the new tracking technology used in basketball, which puts rebounding in whole new light.

Movie Interviews
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

'These Birds Walk': The Story Of Pakistan's Runaway Children

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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History
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Carnaval In Recife: Long History, Interesting Future

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. It's Carnaval in Brazil - that time of the year when people take to the streets and celebrate before the austerity of Lent begins. And while you may think the Rio de Janeiro when you think of Carnaval, we're going to take you north to Recife. It's considered one of the most diverse carnivals in Brazil. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Recife.

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Music News
5:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

ABBA's 1970s Costumes Decidedly Worth The Tax Break

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:34 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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Movie Reviews
9:57 am
Sun February 23, 2014

A 'Tale' That's A Labor Of Love, But Not A Complete Success

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 10:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Book fans can be pretty picky about how Hollywood treats their favorite reads. And Hollywood can sometimes disappoint. Marc Helprin's "Winter's Tale" has been a favorite of readers since it was published in 1983. Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan has a review of how well it works as a movie.

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The Sunday Conversation
8:18 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Fed Up With Harassment, Author Reveals Her Cyberstalker

Author Melissa Anelli has to let the FBI know whenever she travels abroad, so that law enforcement in other countries is alerted to the possibility her stalker might show up.
Jordan Edwards

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 8:45 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Melissa Anelli is the author of Harry, A History, a best-selling book about Harry Potter from J.K. Rowling's famous series. And for more than five years, she has also been the victim of a cyberstalker.

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Law
7:49 am
Sun February 23, 2014

N.Y. Becomes Largest Prison System To Curb Solitary Confinement

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 9:57 am

New York made sweeping changes this week to the way prisons use solitary confinement.

The deal, signed by a federal judge on Wednesday, was prompted by a federal lawsuit filed by critics who say thousands of inmates — some of them pregnant or mentally ill — are being held for months and even years in isolation, often for minor infractions.

Years Spent In Solitary

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Sunday Puzzle
7:29 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Famous Four-By-Fours That Aren't Trucks

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 9:57 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a famous person with four letters in his or her first name and four letters in the last. For each person, you'll be given initials and an anagram of the full name. You name the person.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous entertainer: two words, four letters in each word. You can rearrange these eight letters to spell the acronym of a well-known national organization, and the word that the first letter of this acronym stands for. Who's the entertainer, and what's the organization?

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Music Interviews
7:29 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Megaband Formed On Craigslist Becomes The Family Crest

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:12 pm

There are big bands and then there are really big bands, like The Family Crest, which features around 300 players. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with lead vocalist Liam McCormick about the band.

Business
7:09 am
Sun February 16, 2014

The Green Rush Begins: Investors Get In On Pot's Ground Floor

Marijuana is sold for recreational use in Denver. Legalization of pot has set off a "green rush" to invest among venture capitalists.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

In the past, you could go to jail for selling marijuana. Now, depending upon where you live, you could end up going to the bank.

Medical marijuana is now legal in 20 states, and legislation is pending in 13 others. It's become a $1.5-billion-a-year industry, and it's expected to triple in just a few years. With legal cannabis one of the world's fastest growing market sectors, investors are seeing green.

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Africa
6:56 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Reversal Of Fortune In CAR Has Muslims Fleeing For Their Lives

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The Central African Republic is a country in chaos. Muslim rebels seized power last year and then lost it as Christian militias have fought back. And the war rages on. France and other countries have sent peacekeeping troops to the CAR. And today, Muslims are being evacuated under the protection of those international troops.

NPR's Gregory Warner is in the Central African Republic. He joins us now on the line. Greg, where are you and what are you seeing?

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Law
6:50 am
Sun February 16, 2014

It's Proven To Save Lives, So Why Is Maine Opposed To Narcan?

Naloxone hydrochloride, also known as Narcan, is an overdose antidote that many states have made available to first-responders.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

Dr. Lynn Ouellette, a psychiatrist from Brunswick, Maine, asks herself "What if?" a lot these days. What if they had found her son just a few minutes earlier? What if they had gotten him to the hospital sooner?

What if they'd had the overdose antidote Narcan in the house?

"What we know is that this saves lives and it gives addicts another chance," she says.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:15 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Get Ready To Flip Your Lid

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "One, Two, Three — Flip!" The answer will come in the form of two words, and for each word you'll get a clue beforehand. Reverse the order of the first three letters of the first word to get the second word. Example: Cavalry sword and more villainous = SABER, BASER.

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Music Interviews
6:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Rachel Ries' Album Reflects Her Urban-Rural Split

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:13 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The lilting voice of Rachel Ries comes to us courtesy of many different landscapes: the wide open spaces of South Dakota, the equatorial humidity of Africa, the bucolic green of Vermont and the managed urban chaos that is Brooklyn.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL RIES: (Singing) Time, I forgiven you, time. You were songs in my head, so I threw you over my little shoulder and you land, you landed on the floor...

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Movie Interviews
6:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Disney's First Crop Of Trained Animators, Profiled

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:44 am

The first generation of animators to attend Walt Disney's California Institute of the Arts in the 1970s is profiled in Vanity Fair magazine. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Nancy Beiman, who was part of that first class.

The Sunday Conversation
10:08 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Addict Lives With 'Monster' That's Waiting To Pounce

Ruben Casteneda
Ruben Casteneda

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 10:45 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

This Sunday Conversation with Ruben Castaneda was inspired by WAMU's five-part series, "Crack: The Drug that Consumed the Nation's Capital."

When Ruben Castaneda first moved to Washington, he lived his life along two separate tracks.

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