NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a64de1c85e3e649c232c|5182a647e1c85e3e649c231b

Podcasts

Pages

NPR Story
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

A Moment That Forever Changed A Soldier's Outlook

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard. In this installment, Spc. Michael Cella remembers a close call while on patrol.

NPR Story
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Military Children Act Out: Performing 'Deployment'

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Since 2001, more than 700,000 American children have had one or more parents deployed overseas by the military. Missed birthdays and other milestones become a part of life for military kids who are not always vocal about their feelings. In Grand Forks, N.D., a play called Deployed helped give some of them a voice. Meg Luther Lindholm reports.

Around the Nation
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Reporting The American Dream

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Throughout the summer, NPR News will look at the history, culture and current state of the American Dream. NPR's Ari Shapiro and John Ydstie join host Rachel Martin to take a political and economic look at the ultimate American aspiration.

Sports
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Musings On The NBA Draft Lottery

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca, who has an off-speed pitch on the week's sports news.

Sports
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Women Push Their Limits In Pro Cycling Race

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

The Exergy Tour began Thursday night in Boise, Idaho. It's the largest women's five-day stage race in North America. It's also the last major race before cycling teams are chosen for the Olympics in London. This Tour is meant to raise the bar for women's cycling but as Sadie Babits reports, the race began with a major upset.

NPR Story
6:09 am
Sun May 27, 2012

The State Of The Church

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

The Catholic Church has been in the public spotlight a lot this year. The issues of contraception and gay marriage have been part of the presidential campaign and church leaders have weighed in. There have also been new revelations in a case involving leaked Vatican documents, and it may actually be a case where the butler did it. Host Rachel Martin speaks with John Allen, a senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter.

NPR Story
5:43 am
Sun May 27, 2012

The Best Moment Of Deployment: Coming Home

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard. In this installment, Staff Sgt. James Bradosky describes a family tragedy that struck just before he left for war.

NPR Story
5:43 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Is Latest Attack In Syria A Game Changer?

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

The United Nations has confirmed that at least 90 people were killed by tank shells and artillery fire in central Syria this weekend. While the UN did not outright say this was the work of the Syrian army, activists and residents say the military is the only institution that has such weapons. NPR's Kelly McEvers in Beirut tells host Rachel Martin the latest.

NPR Story
5:43 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Under Summer Sun, Presidential Race Heats Up

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Scott Horsley about the aggressive campaigning in recent weeks by both President Obama and Mitt Romney. Both men are focusing on jobs and the economy.

National Teachers Initiative
4:34 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Hard Lessons Follow Rocky Start For Chicago Teacher

Tyrese Graham teaches science at John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 7:39 am

Tyrese Graham is a second-year science teacher at John Marshall Metropolitan High School on the West Side of Chicago. When he started teaching there, Marshall was among the worst public schools in the city.

When Graham walked into his first class, he could hardly speak over the noise of the students. He tried to make a point by not talking.

"I'll let you finish, but realize, every moment that I'm not talking and providing you instruction, you guys will be giving that back to me," he told them.

Graham's remarks were met with a sharp rebuke from one of his students.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:33 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Canadian Brass: Spiking The Recital With Humor

"Given that we were brass players when we started out, we had a very tall hill to climb just to get people interested in our music," says Canadian Brass founding member Chuck Daellenbach (center).
Bo Huang Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

When the Canadian Brass came to NPR for a Tiny Desk Concert, the group kicked off the show with a piece its members say has been central to its repertoire for more than 40 years. It's a transcription of an organ work, Johann Sebastian Bach's "Little" Fugue in G Minor.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:33 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Deep In The Desert, Monks Make Transcendent Music

The monks of The Monastery of Christ in the Desert, on the grounds in Abiquiu, N.M.
Sergio Salvador Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

If you drive about an hour and a half north of Santa Fe, N.M., into a place called the Chama Canyon, you might hear the clanging of church bells in the distance. The Monastery of Christ in the Desert was founded there in 1964 and is home to a community of Benedictine monks. They spend their days in prayer, work, meditation — and music.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
8:03 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

Just Give It A Shot In The Dark

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:16 pm

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a phrase in the form "___ in the ___." You'll be given rhymes for the first and last words, and you give the phrases.

Last Week's Challenge From Listener Peter Persoff of Piedmont, Calif.: Think of a common three-letter word and five-letter word that together consist of eight different letters of the alphabet. Put the same pair of letters in front of each of these words, and you will have the present and past-tense forms of the same verb. What words are these?

Read more
NPR Story
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Where Chen Fits In A History Of Dissidents

Host Rachel Martin talks with China scholar Perry Link about activist Chen Guangcheng's arrival in the U.S. Link has followed the lives of Chinese dissidents involved with the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests.

NPR Story
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Eclipse-Chaser Shares Thrill Of The Hunt

Out West Sunday, it will start getting dark earlier than normal, but just for a little while. A major solar eclipse, although not quite total, will spread across the skies in a 200-mile swath from Oregon into west Texas. Longtime Washington, D.C., meteorologist Bob Ryan has traveled the world chasing eclipses with his wife. He joins host Rachel Martin.

NPR Story
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

NATO Buzzword: 'Sustainment' In Afghanistan

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. World leaders are gathered in Chicago for a two-day NATO summit, which starts this morning. The summit agenda centers on Afghanistan, specifically figuring out how to meet a 2014 withdrawal deadline while shoring up Afghanistan's security forces. We'll hear a view from the White House in a moment. But we begin with this report from NPR's Jackie Northam in Chicago.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE CHANTING)

Read more
Middle East
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Egyptian Candidate Gains Support, Despite Reputation

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Egyptians are getting ready for an historic vote, their first real presidential election since former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted during the Arab Spring. Twelve candidates are in the running. One them, former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, is already dividing voters ahead of Wednesday's vote. Many consider Shafiq a corrupt holdover from the old regime.

But as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo, he is gaining widespread support from Egyptians fed up with the growing insecurity in their country.

Read more
Middle East
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Lessons For Egyptian Elections From Turkey

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And when Egyptians head to the polls this week, many will be looking to celebrate the end of military rule, which began some 50 years ago. Observers warn that it won't be easy to send a deeply entrenched military back to its barracks, and they point to Turkey's experience as an example.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul.

Read more
Afghanistan
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

White House Balances Money, Security In Afghanistan

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So as we just heard, this NATO summit will be crucial when it comes to working out who's going to put up the money needed to support and train Afghan security forces in the years to come. The White House is leading the charge, so next we go to Ben Rhodes, White House spokesman on national security issues. Ben Rhodes, thanks so much for joining us.

BEN RHODES: Good to be with you.

Read more
History
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

A Lawman Killed By Hate; Now, ATF Remembers

Host Rachel Martin takes a moment to remember William Henderson Foote, a black federal agent in Mississippi in the late 1800s. He was honored this week by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Around the Nation
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Lost, Found And Replaced: Lincoln's Sword

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Last fall, Abe Lincoln lost his sword. A copper blade went missing from atop President Abraham Lincoln's burial site in Illinois. Authorities eventually recovered it, but in two pieces. Now, as Rachel Otwell reports, the artifact has been replaced.

RACHEL OTWELL, BYLINE: Lincoln's tomb is at Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield, Illinois. It's a massive structure with statues of Union soldiers that reach far into the sky. Mikle Siere works at the historic site. He describes the statue the sword was taken from.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:39 am
Sun May 20, 2012

An Author's Journey Back To 'The Lower River'

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Writer Paul Theroux can't shake Africa. Almost 50 years ago, he lived in the small central African nation of Malawi. Theroux was there for four years teaching English as a Peace Corps volunteer, and some of the most visceral details have stayed with him.

Read more
NPR Story
6:26 am
Sun May 20, 2012

The View Of The War From Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 6:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's turn now to how all of this is playing out on the ground. And for that, we're joined now by our two correspondents in the region. Julie McCarthy is in with us on the line from Islamabad in Pakistan and Quil Lawrence is in the Afghan capital Kabul. Good morning to you both.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Good morning.

QUIL LAWRENCE, BYLINE: Good morning.

Read more
NPR Story
6:26 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Donor Resurrects Endangered Bookmobile

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 6:39 am

When a bookmobile broke down last winter in rural Vermont, patrons, especially preschoolers, really missed it. Then a donor, who heard an NPR story about the rolling library's demise, came up with over $100,000 for a replacement. The town can't believe its good fortune. Vermont Public Radio's Charlotte Albright reports.

NPR Story
6:26 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Sports Injuries: A Look At The Data

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 6:39 am

If life is a ballgame, then NPR's Mike Pesca is the guy in the stands, carrying his own stat-sheet and searching out empirical evidence. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Pesca about what the numbers have to say about injuries.

Movies
4:13 am
Sun May 20, 2012

From Borat To Aladeen, Laughter Is Cohen's Goal

Sacha Baron Cohen plays the fictional North African leader Haffaz Aladeen in his new movie, The Dictator.
Melinda Sue Gordon Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 8:27 am

There isn't much actor and comedian Sacha Baron Cohen won't do for a laugh.

Baron Cohen splashed his face with toilet water as Borat, the clueless TV reporter from Kazakhstan. He stripped in front of Congressman Ron Paul as Bruno, the gay Austrian fashion journalist.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:12 am
Sun May 20, 2012

Behind The Shades: Slash Tries To 'Figure This Thing Out'

Slash, the former lead guitarist for Guns N' Roses, has a new album out.
Travis Shinn

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 6:33 am

Behind the opening notes of "Welcome to the Jungle" was a musician with a sound and look all his own. Slash was the lead guitarist of the legendary band Guns N' Roses. His new album is called Apocalyptic Love.

Slash's given name was Saul Hudson. When he was a teenager, his friend's dad dubbed him "Slash" and it stuck. With a name like that, he was destined for rock stardom.

For years, it's been hard to find a picture of him without shades and a hat on.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat May 19, 2012

Initially Famous 2: Electric Boogaloo

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 7:21 pm

On-Air Challenge: This week's challenge is a twist on "Characteristic Initials." We will gives clues for some famous people, past and present. The initial letters of the clues are also the initials of the answers. For example "Wrote Sonnets" would be "William Shakespeare."

Last Week's Challenge: Name a state capital. Change one of the vowels to another vowel and say the result phonetically. You will name a revered profession. What is it?

Answer: Madison and medicine

Read more
From Our Listeners
5:44 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Your Letters: Political Ads And Art

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 10:09 am

Host Rachel Martin reads comments from listeners on last week's story about the Massachusetts Senate race and the Keith Haring exhibit in New York.

NPR Story
5:43 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Military Chaplains Raise Gay Marriage Concerns

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 10:09 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Rachel Martin.

On the same day that President Obama announced that he's had a change of heart and now publicly supports same-sex marriage, there were quieter moves on Capitol Hill to protect the rights of some who do not.

On Wednesday, the House Armed Services Committee passed its version of a bill designed, in part, to protect military chaplains from coming under pressure to marry service members of the same sex.

Read more

Pages