NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Asia
5:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Chinese Flood Streets In Anti-Japan Demonstrations

Protester Mu Peidong carries a homemade sign that reads: "Even if we have to kill all Japanese, we must recover the Diaoyu islands."
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:48 am

It's been a weekend of huge anti-Japanese protests in as many as 85 cities across China, according to the Kyodo news agency.

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Politics
5:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

What To Watch For In Race For Hispanic Vote

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

With about 50 days to go before Election Day, both parties are focusing on what will lead them to victory in both the battle for the White House, as well as control in Congress. What everyone seems to agree upon is that the Latino vote will be crucial. Between 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population in the U.S. increased by some 43 percent. Latino voters can mean the difference in several states.

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Sports
5:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Reading The Baseball Tea Leaves

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's time to talk sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

WERTHEIMER: It's mid-September and for fans of Major League Baseball that means only a couple of weeks are left before playoffs get underway.

But before the games begin, NPR's Mike Pesca has been stacking up the baseball stats and he's here to share his findings. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: They're about to topple over just now.

(LAUGHTER)

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History
5:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Reenacting Antietam: Fighting As Family Once Did

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Tomorrow marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's Battle of Antietam, one of the bloodiest days of any war. In honor of the sesquicentennial, the battle site is hosting a slew of events commemorating the fight. Reporter Jacob Fenston went to Sharpsburg, Maryland, the site of the battle, and brings us this report.

JACOB FENSTON, BYLINE: It started just before dawn.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUGLE PLAYING)

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Around the Nation
5:35 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Homestead Act Sewed Its Way Into U.S. Fabric

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Of course, the Homestead Act was born during troubled times in American history. It passed during the Civil War, but just barely. And it came at the expense of Native Americans, who were displaced from lands they have settled for generation. We spoke to Jonathan Earle, an associate professor of history at the University of Kansas, and asked him why the Homestead Act was so difficult to pass.

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Around the Nation
4:41 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Still Home Sweet Home More Than A Century Later

Lee and Shirley Wohler in the kitchen of their farmhouse south of Waterville, Kan.
Becky Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

This year, the Homestead Act of 1862 turned 150. That landmark piece of legislation opened up the Western territories to settlement. Almost anybody could receive up to 160 acres for free if they built a house and "improved" the land over the course of five years. Millions took part, and eventually, more than 10 percent of all U.S. land was given away.

A German peasant named Frederick Wohler was one of those early homesteaders. Wohler received the deed to 80 acres of farmland in north-central Kansas 138 years ago this weekend. And today, the Wohlers are still there.

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Music Interviews
4:40 am
Sun September 16, 2012

The Coal Porters: Pulling Bluegrass Up By The Roots

Find the One is the latest album by the alt-bluegrass act The Coal Porters, led by Sid Griffin (far left).
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:27 pm

Sid Griffin is an "alt" kind of guy: In the 1980s, he got in on the ground floor of the alt-country music scene in Los Angeles with his band the Long Ryders.

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Books
4:24 am
Sun September 16, 2012

In 'Victory Lab,' A Concoction Crafted To Move Voters

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 12:24 pm

Campaigns today are collecting information that goes way beyond demographics. Data points as disparate as the catalogs you peruse or the car you drive all make up a picture that campaigns use to find common ground with their candidates — and get you to the voting booth.

Journalist Sasha Issenberg describes this data-driven world in his new book, The Victory Lab. There were two "major innovations" that spurred the modern approach to voter outreach, he tells Weekend Edition guest host Linda Wertheimer.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Missing In Action

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar phrase in the form of "___ and ___." You'll be given the two missing words, each with a letter removed, and you give the phrases. For example, given "lot and fund," the answer would be "lost and found."

Last week's challenge from listener Erica Avery of Wisconsin: Name a world capital whose letters can be rearranged to spell a popular and much-advertised drug. What's the capital, and what's the drug?

Answer: Tripoli, Lipitor

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Africa
11:43 am
Sun September 9, 2012

S. Africa Mine Dispute Surfaces Other Issues

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Mine workers in South Africa face a deadline tomorrow to return to work following a deadly dispute over pay and conditions. Violence erupted last month at the world's third-largest platinum mine. Thirty-four miners were shot dead in a confrontation with police. Striking miners are refusing to go back to work until their demands are met. And there are concerns about labor unrest, which has spread to other parts of the country's lucrative mining industry.

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Business
11:43 am
Sun September 9, 2012

After 73 Years At Macy's, Employee Retires

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Rose Syracuse has held one job - one job only - for her entire life. For 73 years, she worked mainly in the accounts department at the Macy's Department store on 34th Street in Manhattan. She's worked for Macy's longer than anyone else - ever. And last week, after all those decades, she retired. Rose Syracuse joins us on the line from New York. Thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us.

ROSE SYRACUSE: Oh, that's fine. And Rose Syracuse would not have retired if she hadn't broken her hip.

WERTHEIMER: Oh, dear.

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Presidential Race
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Romney Hopes To Swing Va. Back To GOP

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Music
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Guitarist Sends 'Good Vibrations' In Lifelong Passion

This summer we've brought you musical postcards of street performers from around the country. Our "Music Alfresco" series takes us to our last stop: Berkeley, Calif., where we meet guitarist Phillip Rosheger.

Presidential Race
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Obama Pitches Recovery On Florida Tour

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

DON GONYEA, BYLINE: This is Don Gonyea in Florida, the perpetual battleground state that President Obama is touring by bus this weekend.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Hello, St. Pete.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Sports
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Anticipation Builds For Football Matches

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. And it is time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

WINONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ballgame, being played each day...

WERTHEIMER: It is the first Sunday of the NFL season. NPR's Mike Pesca is back with us this week for a look at today's action on the gridiron. Mike, welcome.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hi.

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Presidential Race
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Post-Convention, Democrats Gain Momentum

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We're joined now by NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Good morning, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Good morning, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: So, Mara, as we heard, President Obama and Mitt Romney are back on the road again, their conventions behind them. According to national polls, it looks like the Democrats got some momentum from their time in Charlotte.

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Sports
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

From War To Competition: Vets In Paralympics

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

A marathon around the city of London wraps up the 2012 Paralympics Games today. They're the biggest, best-attended games in the history of the event, which began as an exhibition of World War II veterans, also in London, at the 1948 Olympics. Veterans from recent wars are returning to the competition now to find a very competitive tournament, and one in which the United States seems to be playing catch-up.

NPR's Quil Lawrence has attended the games. He joins us now from outside London. Quil, welcome.

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House & Senate Races
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Eyes Off The White House: Other Races To Watch

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 11:42 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Just under two months to go before Election Day. The national conventions are over. We're weeks away from debates. And while Democrats and Republicans try to win the White House, they are also locked in a battle for control of Congress. Republicans made historic gains in the House in 2010. And while the GOP didn't quite get a majority in the Senate, they had great expectations of this year because the numbers are in their favor.

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Economy
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Shaping The Economic Future: 4 Big Ideas

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 10:02 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Over the last month, WEEKEND EDITION has been talking to top economists about jobs, growth, debt and taxes. But we also ask them a broader question: What is the one big idea in economics that's really caught your attention lately?

NOURIEL ROUBINI: Ideally, I would like the economists to become boring again.

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Education
3:48 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Chicago Teachers May Strike, Teach Political Lesson

Members of community group Parents 4 Teachers display pro-teacher posters outside City Hall Friday in Chicago. The Chicago Teachers Union has threatened to strike Monday if negotiations fail.
Sitthixay Ditthavong AP

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Twenty-five thousand Chicago teachers are planning to walk off the job Monday if they don't have a contract by midnight Sunday. As the Democrats look to unions to help them get out the vote, a strike by Chicago teachers might just put a crimp in those plans.

On Friday during rush hour, a handful of parents and students stood on a bridge over the Eisenhower Expressway, holding signs that read, "Honk if you support teachers." Among them is Rhoda Gutierrez, who has two children in a Chicago public elementary school.

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Fine Art
3:47 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Are All Young Artists 'Post-9/11' Artists?

Knitting Is for Pus**** is a work by crochet sculptor Olek. He has created an entire apartment blanketed in brightly colored, crocheted camouflage.
Olek Courtesy Jonathan LeVine Gallery, New York, N.Y.

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 1:52 am

When museum curator Nicholas Bell was putting together the show Craft Futures: 40 Under 40 at the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick Gallery, he realized the artists had something in common besides their under-40 status. Because of their youth, he felt that each of them could be classified as "post 9/11" artists.

"Their worldview is defined by the angst, the unease, the trepidation of the difficulties of the 21st century," he says.

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Around the Nation
3:46 am
Sun September 9, 2012

VFW Posts Become Refuge For Women, Too

From left, Linda Ausen, Marvin Jansma, Diane Sandberg and David Griffith volunteer during bingo night in July at the VFW post in Rosemount, Minn.
Jennifer Simonson MPR

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

For decades, Veterans of Foreign Wars posts have played vital roles in small towns throughout America. But in recent years, as World War II veterans have passed away, membership in VFWs has fallen drastically, and many posts have closed. Now, though, some are facing a possible renaissance, thanks to female soldiers returning from overseas.

The main room of the VFW post in Rosemount, Minn., is half-bar and half-bingo hall, with long card tables. In a corner, two men on a stage rotate a round cage of balls and call out bingo numbers.

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House & Senate Races
3:45 am
Sun September 9, 2012

GOP Has Rare Shot At Winning House Seat In Mass.

Richard Tisei is running for U.S. House in Massachusetts, where he could be the first Republican in that seat in 15 years.
Josh Reynolds AP

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

U.S. House candidate Richard Tisei is openly gay. He's also openly Republican.

"You know what, in Massachusetts, it's a lot easier to be gay than be a Republican," he says, "as far as trying to get elected to office."

But Tisei could make political history for the Massachusetts GOP. Not just because they could win their first U.S. House seat in 15 years, but also because Tisei would be the first openly gay Republican to be elected to a term in Congress.

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Author Interviews
3:44 am
Sun September 9, 2012

'Good Girls Revolt': Story Of A Newsroom Uprising

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 6:42 am

In the 1960s, Lynn Povich worked at Newsweek — where she became part of a revolution.

"At Newsweek, women were hired on the mail desk to deliver mail, then to clip newspapers, and, if they were lucky, became researchers or fact checkers," Povich tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer, whom she knows personally. "All of the writers and reporters were men, and everyone accepted it as that was the way the world was — until we didn't."

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun September 9, 2012

The Raveonettes: The Sound Of Surfing In The Rain

The Raveonettes is the Danish-born duo of Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo. The band's new album is titled Observator.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

For more than a decade, The Raveonettes' members have been making albums filled with fuzz-guitar feedback and tight girl-group harmonies. The duo's latest album, Observator, takes on a different sound, thanks in part to its embrace of a new instrument.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

Drawing A Blank (Or Two)

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 11:50 am

On-air challenge: You are given sentences with two blanks. Put a word starting with R in the first blank. Then move that R to the end to make a new word that goes in the second blank to complete the sentence. For example, given the sentence, "The door of the Indian ___ was left slightly ___," the answers would be "raja" and "ajar."

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Politics
4:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

At DNC, Obama Must Show 'Roadmap To Future'

Weekend Edition Sunday guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell about the upcoming Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. Rendell is a former chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

Arts & Life
4:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Wanted: Sitter For Rural Bookshop. Must Like Cats

Weekend Edition Sunday guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with Wendy Welch and Jack Beck, owners of Tales of the Lonesome Pine bookstore in Big Stone Gap, Va. They are looking for someone to watch their shop while embarking on a two-month book tour. Wendy has written a memoir about owning a brick and mortar bookshop in a small, rural community.

Politics
4:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Previewing The Democratic National Convention

Weekend Edition Sunday guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson about the latest political news, as we await the start of the Democratic National Convention.

Middle East
4:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Refugees Continue To Flee From Violence In Syria

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

The conflict in Syria continues, anti-government rebels claim they have captured an air defense base in eastern Syria. The rebels are now concentrating on President Bashar al-Assad's air power, but that's according to videos posted online and reports from activists groups.

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