NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Theater
3:44 am
Sun October 28, 2012

Star-Studded 'Heiress' Considers A Woman's Worth

Jessica Chastain makes her Broadway debut as Catherine Sloper in The Heiress. Chastain says she was moved by the arc of her character's story — initially defined by the men in her life, but ultimately finding strength in herself.
(c) 2012 Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 8:58 am

A much-anticipated revival of The Heiress, a 1947 play based on the Henry James novella Washington Square, opens in New York on Thursday. It marks the Broadway debut of two accomplished young stars — Jessica Chastain, the Academy Award nominee from The Help, and Dan Stevens, from the hit television series Downton Abbey.

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It's All Politics
3:43 am
Sun October 28, 2012

Democrats See Opportunity In Fiery Illinois House Race

Republican U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh and challenger Democrat Tammy Duckworth before a televised debate at the WTTW studios on Oct. 18, 2012, in Chicago.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 1:06 am

One of the most bitter congressional races is in the suburbs of Chicago, where controversial freshman Republican Joe Walsh is fighting to keep a seat he was actually drawn out of.

The Tea Party favorite's bombastic rants frequently get him into trouble, even with members of his own party, and Walsh is facing a tough Democratic opponent in Iraq war veteran Tammy Duckworth, who lost both of her legs in combat.

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Music
12:03 am
Sun October 28, 2012

Manu Katche's New Album Drops The 'Sledgehammer'

Manu Katche's self-titled fourth album comes out Tuesday.
Gildas Bolclé Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 8:58 am

Peter Gabriel has just finished up the 25th-anniversary tour of his blockbuster album So. Manu Katche, the drummer who provided the driving beats for "Sledgehammer" and other songs from that record, was right there with Gabriel, helping him celebrate.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun October 28, 2012

'Singing Is Praying' For Iris DeMent

Iris DeMent's new album is titled Sing the Delta.
Pieta Brown Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 8:58 am

Singer Iris DeMent made her debut in 1992 with an album called Infamous Angel.

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NPR Story
9:10 am
Sun October 21, 2012

GOP Targets Vulnerable Georgia Democrat

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn our attention now to the state of Georgia, where a self-described moderate Democrat is trying to win re-election in a district that now favors Republicans. John Barrow is facing a relatively unknown GOP candidate in the 12th Congressional District that's recently been redrawn. National Republicans see Barrow as one of the most vulnerable Democrats in the House, and they're targeting him with millions of dollars in ads.

NPR's Kathy Lohr has the story.

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Remembrances
8:08 am
Sun October 21, 2012

McGovern Legacy Offers More Than A Lost Presidency

McGovern listens to a constituent in 1974.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

Former Sen. George McGovern died early Sunday in his hometown of Sioux Falls, S.D. He was 90 years old, and had been in failing health. McGovern served two terms in the House and three in the Senate, but was best known as the Democratic Party's ill-fated nominee against President Nixon in the election of 1972.

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NPR Story
4:29 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Election 2012: Brunch In Idaho

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:29 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Basketball's Top Scorer Is Not In The NBA

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Some people travel a long ways to find a job, even professional basketball players. Brooklyn native Everage Richardson is playing hoops in a tiny town in Germany's Harz Mountains. Reporter Connor Donevan has his story.

CONNOR DONEVAN, BYLINE: When Everage Richardson finished his college basketball career, he was looking for somewhere to play. Somewhere turned out to be Elbingerode Germany, for the Bodfeld Baskets, a town and a team he knew next to nothing about.

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NPR Story
4:29 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Looking To Rebuild, Egypt Leans On New Constitution

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 2011, thousands of Egyptians put their lives on the line in a revolution that would ultimately bring down a dictator. Now, the principles at the heart of that struggle are being defined in a new Egyptian constitution. The document is being written by an assembly made up mostly of Islamists. Liberal and secular groups are protesting the recent draft; they're concerned about the rights of minorities and women. On Tuesday, a court in Cairo will decide whether to dissolve the drafting assembly and start the process all over.

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Sunday Puzzle
11:59 pm
Sat October 20, 2012

'Poked' And 'Tummy' Become 'Poker' And 'Rummy'

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:03 am

On-air challenge: You will be given two words. Change one letter in each of them to make two new words that name things that are in the same category. (Hint: In each pair, the letter that you change to — that is, the new letter — is the same in each pair.) For example, given the words "poked" and "tummy," the answer would be "poker" and "rummy."

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Poetry
12:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

'A Thousand Mornings' With Poet Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver has won a Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.
Rachel Giese Brown

Mary Oliver is a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet whose body of work is largely filled with imagery of the natural world — cats, opossums crossing the street, sunflowers and black oaks in the sunshine. Her most recent collection is entitled A Thousand Mornings.

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NPR Story
12:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

Sen. Arlen Specter, A Moderate Voice For 30 Years, Dies

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, BYLINE: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Longtime Republican Senator Arlen Specter has died. The GOP firebrand made headlines in 2009 when he switched parties. Before leaving the Republican Party and becoming a Democrat, he had a reputation for speaking out against some of his own party's positions.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED TAPE)

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Author Interviews
12:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

Word Wars And The 'Story Of Ain't'

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 1961, dictionary publishers G & C Merriam published a revised edition of "Webster's New International Dictionary" which, since it's printing in 1934, was considered the standard bearer of American English. "Webster's Third New International Dictionary" was a thoroughly modern tome. It added thousands of new words, updated usage suggestions, and was meant to capture language on the cutting edge of American culture. Instead, it sent scholars and wordsmiths into a frenzy.

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Theater
12:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

'Beat Generation,' Kerouac's Lost Play, Hits Stage

The cast rehearses a scene from Jack Kerouac's only play, The Beat Generation.
Courtesy of the Merrimack Repertory Theater

Originally published on Sat October 20, 2012 1:55 pm

Jack Kerouac shot to fame after his jazz- and drug-infused book, On the Road, hit stores in 1957. During that hot period the autobiographical novelist also wrote his only play, The Beat Generation.

The play was never produced and all but forgotten. The lost work, however, was rediscovered in 2004 and is now set to premiere in the writer's hometown of Lowell, Mass.

Charles Towers, artistic director at the Merrimack Repertory Theater, remembers exactly what he thought after Kerouac's lost play was uncovered.

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Science
4:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

A Human-Powered Helicopter: Straight Up Difficult

Kyle Glusenkamp pilots Gamera, a human-powered helicopter.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:00 am

"I grew up wanting to fly," says Graham Bowen-Davies. "I guess I just settled for being an engineer."

He's standing on an indoor track in southern Maryland, watching a giant helicopter take flight. At the end of each of its four spindly arms — arms he helped design and build — a giant rotor churns the air. In the cockpit sits the engine: a 0.7-horsepower, 135-pound graduate student named Kyle Gluesenkamp.

Gluesenkamp is pedaling like crazy to keep the rotors spinning and the craft aloft.

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Theater
4:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Hard Life Of Pullman Porters Gets Stage Debut

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 12:14 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For most of the 20th century, if you wanted to travel in style you were traveling on trains. If you really wanted to do it up right, you shelled out big money for a private berth in something called a Pullman car. Thousands of African-American men found steady work as Pullman porters, but they also faced low wages, terrible working conditions and racism.

Seattle-based playwright Cheryl West tells their story in "Pullman Porter Blues." It's a musical drama premiering at the Seattle Repertory Theatre.

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Economy
4:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

What Recent Gains Mean For U.S. Economy

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 12:14 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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History
4:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Lessons From The Cuban Missile Crisis

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 12:14 pm

Fifty years ago, a United States Air Force U-2 spyplane captured photographic proof that the Soviet Union was installing offensive nuclear missile sites in Cuba, and a diplomatic standoff ensued. Weekend Edition host Rachel Martin talks with Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and professor at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government about the lessons learned from the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Sports
4:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Week In Sports: Big Surprises In Baseball Playoffs

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 12:14 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Baseball playoffs moved into the league championships last night and the New York Yankees suffered a 6-4 loss. Yankees captain Derek Jeter suffered a broken ankle. NPR's Mike Pesca hasn't missed a minute of the postseason drama. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: There have been a lot of games. I think I'll cop to missing a couple of minutes but yeah, yeah.

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Sunday Puzzle
2:32 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Where, 'O' Where Shall I Put You?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 12:14 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the letter "O" is added at the end of the first word to make the second word. For example, given the clue "pack animal owned by Thomas Jefferson's first vice president," the answer would be "Burr burro."

Last week's challenge: Draw a regular hexagon and connect every pair of vertices except one. The pair you don't connect are not on opposite sides of the hexagon but along a shorter diagonal. How many triangles of any size are in this figure?

Answer: 82 triangles

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Alt.Latino
12:03 am
Sun October 14, 2012

What Two Songs Say About Argentine History

Argentine band Tremor adds a new twist to a traditional dance music known as malambo.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 12:19 pm

A country's music can reveal a lot about its history. This week, Alt.Latino hosts Jasmine Garsd and Felix Contreras stop by Weekend Edition Sunday to offer two examples from Argentina.

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NPR Story
9:24 am
Sun October 7, 2012

The Barcode: Through Thick And Thin For 60 Years

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today marks an important anniversary. On October 7, 1952, 60 years ago, the patent for the bar code was filed. For younger listeners, it's perhaps hard to imagine that there was actually a time when everything you bought wasn't scanable. Today, of course, those vertical zebra stripes are ubiquitous, on everything - from air fresheners to zombie survival kits.

According to the BBC, the very first item ever scanned by its barcode was a pack of chewing gum in an Ohio supermarket in 1974.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

National Security
5:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

After Years-Long Battles, Terrorism Suspects In U.S.

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Prosecutors are calling it a milestone for the U.S. justice system. A radical Islamic cleric and four other of America's most wanted terrorism suspects have finally appeared in courts in New York and Connecticut. Authorities had fought for years to extradite the men from the United Kingdom. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

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Around the Nation
5:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Pinball Wizards At Home In Colo. Mountain Town

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When was the last time you heard this sound:

(SOUNDBITE OF PINBALL MACHINE)

MARTIN: Pinball machines are as popular as ever in a small mountain town in Colorado, giving a new generation a taste of the past. NPR's Ahmad Shafi has the story.

(SOUNDBITE OF PINBALL MACHINE)

AHMAD SHAFI, BYLINE: Lyons, Colorado sits in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, about 20 miles north of Boulder. It's known for its annual music festivals and art scene. But in downtown Lyons, there's a business that doesn't fit that mold.

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Economy
5:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

As Fiscal Cliff Nears, Simpson-Bowles Re-Emerges

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Simpson, Bowles - the names flew by eight times, without explanation, during Wednesday's presidential debate. Google reported that Simpson-Bowles was among the most searched-for terms online that night. The reference was to Republican elder statesman Alan Simpson and his Democratic counterpart, Erskine Bowles. The two headed a 2010 commission on the national debt.

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Around the Nation
5:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Thousands Hold Fast To Tradition Of Oral Storytelling

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Before Twitter, radio, even electricity - in fact, going all the way back to pre-historic times, people gathered around fires to listen to stories. Even though the glow of computers has replaced the warmth of the campfire for most of us, some folks still hold fast to the tradition of oral storytelling.

As Missy Shelton reports, nearly 10,000 people have gathered this weekend for the National Storytelling Festival in northeast Tennessee to hear professional tellers weave some good yarns.

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The Picture Show
4:15 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Catching The 'Shadow' Of A Lost World

Wedding party, 1914. A still from the film In the Land of the Head Hunters, in which Curtis sought to re-create a mythic story of the Kwakiutl.
Edward Curtis Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Photographer Edward Curtis started off his career at the tail end of the 19th century, making portraits of Seattle's wealthiest citizens. But a preoccupation with Native Americans and a chance encounter on a mountaintop triggered an idea: Curtis decided to chronicle the experience of the vanishing tribes — all of them. It was an unbelievably ambitious project that would define Curtis, his work and his legacy.

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Television
4:11 am
Sun October 7, 2012

TV's Britton Fights To Stay In Nashville's Lights

Country singer Rayna James (Connie Britton) has got a big voice, big hair and big problems in Nashville on ABC.
Katherine Bomboy-Thornton ABC

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

If you're a country music fan, the name Rayna Jaymes may not ring a bell. That's because Rayna Jaymes is a fictional character played by actress Connie Britton. Britton stars in the new TV series Nashville, which premieres this Wednesday on ABC.

TV fans will know Britton for her Emmy-nominated roles in American Horror Story and Friday Nights Lights, in which she played Tami Taylor, the wife of a high school football coach in a small Texas town.

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Author Interviews
4:11 am
Sun October 7, 2012

'Wooden Floors' Pack Hidden Thrill In Author's Debut

Wooden floor and chair
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

Housesitting is a delicate chore. It involves inhabiting someone else's home — their personal space, watching over their stuff — and sticking to the Boy Scouts' creed to leave no trace. That's pretty much the opposite of what happens in Will Wiles' debut novel, Care of Wooden Floors. It's the story of an already strained friendship pushed to the breaking point by a housesitting favor gone terribly, terribly wrong.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Holly Golightly: Singing In The Back Of The Revival Tent

Holly Golightly and Lawyer Dave look to midcentury R&B and gospel on their latest album, Sunday Run Me Over.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:24 am

For more than 20 years, the British songwriter Holly Golightly — yes, named for the heroine in Breakfast at Tiffany's — has been a lo-fi artist with a spare, stripped-down sound that hits you somewhere in the midsection.

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