NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Books
3:06 am
Sun February 10, 2013

At 50, Does 'Feminine Mystique' Still Roar?

Betty Friedan, co-founder of National Organization for Women (NOW), speaks during the Women's Strike for Equality event in New York on Aug. 26, 1970, the 50th anniversary of women's suffrage.
AP

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 5:50 am

In 1963, Betty Friedan called it "the problem that has no name" and then proceeded to name it — and the name stuck. The problem was "The Feminine Mystique," which was also the title of her groundbreaking book, published 50 years ago.

Since its first publication in 1963, millions of people have read The Feminine Mystique. These days, many people read it in college — often in women's studies classes. Even so, when we talked with some young women in downtown Washington, D.C., many knew little or nothing about it.

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Digital Life
3:05 am
Sun February 10, 2013

Raising Personable Children, Even If They're Glued To Phones

The Jordans use an iPad to talk to their daughter, Kelly, who's at school in Chicago.
Marie McGrory for NPR

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 2:00 pm

Weekend Edition Sunday is taking a look at how technology affects personal relationships. Along with romantic and workplace connections, family dynamics are shifting.

The Jordans are a classic example of a family trying to figure out how to use technology without feeling disconnected from one another. Sue and David have five kids: two off at college and three still at home.

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Music News
12:03 am
Sun February 10, 2013

The Kentucky Fiddler Who Inspired Aaron Copland's 'Rodeo'

Fiddler Bill Stepp in Kentucky's Magoffin County in the 1930s.
Courtesy of Elsie Risner and Becky Arnett

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:29 pm

Sunday night's Grammys are an opportunity to rain accolades on pop music and perhaps witness the musical return of Justin Timberlake. But each year, the Recording Academy also honors recordings of "lasting significance" by inducting them into the Grammy Hall of Fame. One of them this year is Kentucky fiddler Bill Stepp's performance of "Bonaparte's Retreat."

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Sunday Puzzle
10:08 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

The Answer Lies Within

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 4:36 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a three-letter word that ends a familiar two-word phrase. You will be given the first word of the phrase. You provide the three-letter word that ends it. And the three letters in your answer will always be found, in some order, inside the first word. For example, given "Arctic," you would say "Air."

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Around the Nation
5:24 am
Sun February 3, 2013

For Returning Vets, Winning The 'Moral victory' Just As Difficult

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:17 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here at home, a former Marine captain named Timothy Kudo left Afghanistan in 2011. But not a day goes by without remembering one, specific incident. It started like this.

TIMOTHY KUDO: These men, on a motorcycle, came up over this hill right above us - a tremendous position, tactically.

MARTIN: Capt. Kudo and his troops held their fire. They weren't sure yet if they were in danger, but it looked like the men might be holding guns.

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NPR Story
4:38 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Tensions Mount Over Airstrike In Syria

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

There's been a lot of talk this weekend at a security conference in Germany about how to resolve the crisis in Syria. And for the first time, a leader of Syria's opposition sat down with officials from Russia and Iran, both countries are key allies of the Syrian regime.

NPR's Kelly McEvers reports.

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NPR Story
4:38 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Gearing Up For Super Bowl XLVII

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ME AND BOBBY MC GEE")

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON: (Singing) Busted flat in Baton Rouge and heading for the trains./

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Do you recognize that voice? Coming up, music legend Kris Kristofferson on his new album and staying humble.

KRISTOFFERSON: To my surprise, I feel nothing but gratitude for being this, you know, old and still above-ground living with the people I love.

MARTIN: Stay tuned for Kris Kristofferson. But first, it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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NPR Story
4:38 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Mayors Of Border Cities Watching Immigration Debate Closely

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The fate of this round of immigration reform will be decided by lawmakers on Capitol Hill. But the effects will be felt in cities and towns across all 50 states, especially those on the U.S.-Mexico border; which is why we reached out to the mayors of two cities in Texas.

John Cook is the mayor of El Paso, Texas. It is the biggest U.S. city on the border. And Raul Salinas is the mayor of Laredo, Texas. His city is the largest transit hub for goods going between Mexico and the U.S.

Thanks to both of you for joining us.

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Music Interviews
3:32 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Kris Kristofferson On Writing For — And Outliving — His Idols

At age 76, musician Kris Kristofferson is still writing songs. His new album is called Feeling Mortal.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 8:06 am

Kris Kristofferson writes the kind of songs that people love to sing: songs like "Help Me Make It Through The Night," from 1970. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a version, as did Joan Baez — and even Elvis.

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Afghanistan
3:21 am
Sun February 3, 2013

From A Land Where Music Was Banned — To Carnegie Hall

Afghanistan's youth orchestra performs in Kabul on Jan. 31. The orchestra is coming to the U.S. and will appear at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 1:49 pm

In Afghanistan, there was no sound of music when the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001. The Islamist militants destroyed music CDs and instruments and even jailed musicians.

Today, there are music schools and young Afghans playing in public. And, this weekend, 48 Afghan boys and girls are traveling to the U.S. to perform at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.

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National Security
3:11 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Panetta: 'My Mission Has Always Been To Keep The Country Safe'

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta arrives in London on Jan. 17. Panetta is stepping down as defense secretary as soon as the Senate confirms his successor.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 1:49 pm

For more than 40 years, Leon Panetta has split his life on two coasts: his home in California and his work in Washington, D.C. It's a career that included 16 years in Congress, stints as White House chief of staff for President Clinton, and as the head of the CIA and the Pentagon under President Obama.

As Panetta prepares to leave his job as defense secretary, he sat down with Rachel Martin, host of Weekend Edition Sunday, to talk about his years in Washington and serving in the Obama administration.

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Sunday Puzzle
2:27 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Tackle 'Yards' To Make A Touchdown

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 5:24 am

On-air challenge: In recognition of the Super Bowl, the key word is "yards." You will be given some categories. For each one, name something in the category beginning with each of the letters Y, A, R, D and S. For example, if the category were "Girls' Names," you might say Yvonne, Alice, Rachel, Donna and Sally.

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Africa
9:05 am
Sun January 27, 2013

In Fight Against Extremists, Mali Is Far From Alone

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The French-led military intervention in Mali is picking up momentum in the campaign to help the Malian government recapture Islamist-occupied strongholds in the north. And while French airpower has tipped the scales in the Malian government's favor, the question now is whether Mali's beleaguered army is up to the fight. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports from Bamako, Mali's capital city in the south.

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Europe
8:00 am
Sun January 27, 2013

The Love Song That Marked A Shift In French-German Relations

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As we just heard, Germans are still figuring out how to live with their military history. We're going to take you back now to the 1960s, when one French singer helped Europeans forgive, if not forget, the horrors of the Second World War. And she did it with this song:

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BARBARA: (Singing in Foreign language)

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Sports
8:00 am
Sun January 27, 2013

How To Handle The Waiting Game In Sports

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: OK. This week, we are going classic, like classical. Like, really old school, you know, Rome, Cicero, Latin. We're talking Latin this week. Specifically we want to talk about interregna or interregnum, if you please, which is a fancy way of saying a gap. Because the NFL is in the middle of a big old interregnum at the moment.

And for more, we are joined by, who else, but our own Marcus Aurelius, NPR's Mike Pesca. Hey, Mike.

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Movie Interviews
4:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

'Stand Up Guys' Director Takes Cues From Hollywood Greats

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Fisher Stevens is a name you may not know but you've probably seen his face. He was in the 1986 film "Short Circuit" with Steve Guttenberg. Fisher also had a role in the 1995 movie "Hackers."

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "HACKERS")

FISHER STEVENS: (as the Plague) Last chance to get out of this developed prison sentence. You're not good enough to beat me.

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Africa
4:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Latest Battle In Mali Has Deep Roots

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For some historical context on the fighting in Mali, we spoke with Gregory Mann. He's an associate professor of history at Columbia University and he's an expert on North Africa, including the area in northern Mali now controlled by insurgents.

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U.S.
4:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Ending Combat Ban More Change In Thinking Than In Reality

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

It was an announcement that made history.

SECRETARY LEON PANETTA: If they can do the job, if they can meet the standards...

MARTIN: Something that will change the U.S. military in a fundamental way.

PANETTA: If they can meet, you know, the qualifications that are involved here, there is no reason why they shouldn't have a chance.

MARTIN: Women can now officially serve in combat. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta made the announcement last week.

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Energy
3:52 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Focus On Fracking Diverts Attention From Horizontal Drilling

Opponents of fracking demonstrate during the Winter X Games 2012 in Aspen, Colo.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

Mention the recent surge in oil and natural gas production in the U.S. and one word comes to mind for a lot of people: "fracking." Hydraulic fracturing is a controversial technique that uses water, sand and potentially hazardous chemicals to break up rock deep underground to release oil and natural gas.

But there's another technology that is just as responsible for drilling booms happening across the country: horizontal drilling.

Environmental Consequences

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Remembrances
3:45 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Saying Goodbye To Bedford Street's Tireless Collector

Alice Elliott, producer of the documentary The Collector of Bedford Street, laughs with Larry Selman in 2003. Selman died Jan. 20. He was 70.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 1:54 pm

Larry Selman devoted more than half his life collecting money for multiple charities, on the streets of New York, from total strangers. He did this for nearly 40 years, despite the fact he was developmentally disabled. Selman became the subject of filmmaker Alice Elliott's Oscar-nominated documentary, The Collector of Bedford Street. He died Jan.

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Commentary
3:37 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Oysters Rebound In Popularity With Man-Made Bounty

Along the East Coast, wild oysters have been disappearing, but the number of farm-raised oysters is exploding.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

In Colonial Virginia, oysters were plentiful; Capt. John Smith said they lay "thick as stones." But as the wild oyster harvest has shrunk, Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf says the market for farm-raised oysters is booming.

The local food movement is expanding from fertile fields to brackish waters.

Along the rivers and bays of the East Coast, where wild oysters have been decimated by man and nature, harvests of farm-raised oysters are increasing by double digits every year. At the same time, raw oyster bars are all the rage.

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Animals
3:34 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Like Sumo Wrestling, With Lots Of Spit: Camels Tussle In Turkey

Two camels fight during the Camel Wrestling Championship in the town of Selcuk, near the western coastal city of Ismir, Turkey, on Jan. 15, 2012. It's the biggest event of the camel-wrestling season in Turkey.
Tolga Bozoglu EPA /Landov

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

"Obama vs. Rambo" may sound like an Onion headline for the gun control debate. But it's actually a must-see matchup for spectators on Turkey's Aegean Coast. The competitors? Two male, or bull, camels.

The biggest event of Turkey's camel wrestling season takes place each year in the town of Selcuk, near the ancient ruins of Ephesus.

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Music Interviews
3:33 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Trixie Whitley: Songs For A Charmed — And Checkered — Life

Trixie Whitley first emerged several years ago as the lead singer of the Daniel Lanois project Black Dub. Her debut as a solo artist is called Fourth Corner.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

In 2010, a young, Belgian-born, blues-rock singer burst onto the scene as the voice of Black Dub, a musical project founded by producer Daniel Lanois.

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Music
3:32 am
Sun January 27, 2013

New Latin Music For 2013

The Oakland, Ca. ensemble Candelaria is one of Alt.Latino's artists to watch for 2013.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

What better way to fight off the winter blues than with some good music? Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd, hosts of NPR's Alt.Latino podcast, return to Weekend Edition Sunday to share some exciting releases from the coming year.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NO. NO. NO.")

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Sports
4:02 am
Sun January 20, 2013

A Week Of Hot Sports News Casts Shadow On Reporting

Originally published on Sun January 20, 2013 6:05 am

It's been a scandalous week in the world of sports. Between Lance Armstrong's big Oprah interview and the discovery of Manti Te'o's unreal girlfriend, there are a lot of questions for people who report on sports .Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Mike Pesca about the events.

NPR Story
3:57 am
Sun January 20, 2013

The Art And Science Of Remaking A Public Persona

Originally published on Sun January 20, 2013 6:05 am

Mark Sanford served as governor of South Carolina until an extramarital affair instigated a censure from the South Carolina Legislature. Lance Armstrong denied using performance-enhancing substances for years, until he admitted to Oprah Winfrey last week that, in fact, he had used those substances. But when can these public figures begin to rehabilitate their images? Host Rachel Martin speaks with crisis manager Judy Smith about the process.

NPR Story
3:57 am
Sun January 20, 2013

Ahead Of Elections, Israelis Talk Politics

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Israelis are going to the polls this week in national elections. And yes, the big issues that are always part of Israeli politics are still there: the conflict with the Palestinians, the threat from Iran. But it's not just security that's on the minds of voters in Israel, especially young people. Last week in Tel Aviv, a bunch of 20-something Israelis gathered in a warehouse on the city's waterfront to talk politics.

(SOUNDBITE OF A CROWD)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Grazie, red wine here.

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NPR Story
3:57 am
Sun January 20, 2013

After Sandy Hook Shootings, Dads Step Up Security

Originally published on Sun January 20, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

After the Newtown shootings, some suggested that schools look to local volunteers to beef up security. One national organization has been doing that for years. It's called Watch D.O.G.S., and it organizes fathers to volunteer in their children's schools. After Sandy Hook, the group's strategy didn't changed. Some Watchdogs say they've just become even more vigilant. NPR's Sam Sanders has this report.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: Like school principals all over the country, Michelle Wise sprung into action after Sandy Hook.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun January 20, 2013

Red Baraat: A Bhangra-Powered Party Starter

Sunny Jain (center, with drum) leads Red Baraat. The band's latest album, Shruggy Ji, came out this month.
Erin Patrice O'Brien Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 20, 2013 6:54 am

Red Baraat is wild — and loud. It's also a genre unto itself. The Brooklyn ensemble self-identifies as "dhol 'n' brass," a hybrid of Indian bhangra and New Orleans big-band music.

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Inauguration 2013
10:27 pm
Sat January 19, 2013

The Presidential Oath: Not Always Perfect, But It Gets The Job Done

Barack Obama takes the oath of office beside his wife Michelle and daughters Sasha, right, and Malia, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 20, 2009.
Chuck Kennedy AP

Originally published on Sun January 20, 2013 4:20 pm

President Obama takes the oath of office for a second term on Sunday and Monday. By the time he is through Monday, he and President Franklin D. Roosevelt will be the only two presidents to have taken the presidential oath four times — Roosevelt because he was elected four times, and Obama because he will have taken the oath twice the first time and twice the second.

Obama took the oath twice in 2009 because he and Chief Justice John Roberts messed it up a bit the first time and redid it a second time in private to quell any questions about Obama being president.

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