NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Around the Nation
3:09 am
Sun April 14, 2013

In Hazleton, A Mixed Welcome For City's Immigrants

Roads End bar on Broad Street in Hazleton, Pa., displays a sign in 2007 that reads "ALL Legals Served." Longtime residents of the city are divided over the recent influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:33 pm

Many residents say Hazleton, Pa., continues life now as a divided city. While some Spanish-speakers build new lives, longtime residents remain split on how the influx has changed their home.

It's not hard to find a Latino business in Hazleton these days, including law firms, insurance agencies and even a migrant education program. Amilcar Arroyo, the publisher of a local Spanish-language newspaper, says Latinos are now firmly establishing themselves as a part of the city.

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Education
2:58 am
Sun April 14, 2013

'Core' Curriculum Puts Education Experts At Odds

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:16 pm

At 2 p.m., it's crunchtime for students who write for The Harbinger Online, the award-winning, student news site at Shawnee Mission East High just outside Kansas City, Kan. They've been investigating an initiative to develop common curriculum and test guidelines for states.

The young reporters have pored over countless documents about the Common Core State Standards and talked to Kansas state legislators who pushed for their adoption, trying to understand why they're necessary.

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Education
2:58 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Jazz In The Cafeteria: Kids Learn To Listen While They Chomp

Saxophonist Harold Rapp plays during lunchtime at Alice Terry Elementary School in Sheridan, Colo.
Jenny Brundin for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:44 pm

School lunch is often synonymous with loud noise. Studies have shown the decibel level in some cafeterias is as high as a lawn mower.

Every so often, though, students at Alice Terry Elementary School, southwest of Denver, are asked not to make any noise.

When the music teacher told students here they'd occasionally have a "silent" lunch break, this was kindergartner Alyssa Norquette's reaction: "Why do we need a silent lunch? Is it because we're too loud or something?"

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Shots - Health News
2:57 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Scientists Race To Stay Ahead Of New Bird Flu Virus

Workers prepare an H7N9 virus detection kit at the Center for Disease Control in Beijing on April 3.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 7:01 am

A precious package arrived at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last Thursday afternoon.

Inside, packed in dry ice to keep it frozen, was a vial containing millions of viruses derived from a 35-year-old Chinese housewife who died last Tuesday of respiratory and kidney failure.

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NPR Story
4:42 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Court Rejects Case To Ban Egyptian Comic's Show

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 9:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Egypt, Bassem Youssef has built a following by making jokes about his own government.

BASSEM YOUSSEF: (Foreign language spoken)

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: That's a bit of sound from Youssef's satirical TV show, which often gets compared to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." His sharp critiques of the president and the ruling political party in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood, have made him famous. But his show has also stirred up controversy.

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NPR Story
4:42 am
Sun April 7, 2013

New Strain Of Avian Flu Worries Scientists

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 9:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In China, authorities are stepping up efforts to contain the spread of a new strain of bird flu, which has killed six people across that country. It is the first time this particular virus, called H7N9, has been detected in humans. For more, Dr. Thomas Frieden joins us. He is the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He joins us on the line from his office in Atlanta, Georgia. Welcome to the program.

DR. THOMAS FRIEDEN: Good morning.

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NPR Story
4:42 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Lianne La Havas: 'The Golden Girl Of British Music'

The singer-songwriter released her debut studio album, Is Your Love Big Enough, this summer.
Ravi Dhar Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 9:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you're open to possibilities and you're brave enough to take risks, good things can happen. Of course, it also helps if you're as talented as 23-year-old Lianne La Havas. One critic called the singer-songwriter the golden girl of British music. Another wondered whether she could be the next Adele. In this encore presentation, NPR's Elizabeth Blair has a profile.

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Author Interviews
3:28 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Stories Of 'Outside The Wire' Give An Insider's View Of War

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 9:08 am

In some ways, it was like any other writing class: backpacks, books, rough drafts, discussions about literature. But instructor Christine Dumaine Leche and her students weren't sitting in a college classroom or a community center — they were on an air base in Afghanistan and the students usually came to class after long days in a war zone. Leche was teaching them to translate their experiences — the danger, the boredom, the painful separation from their families, the fear and the hatred — into prose.

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Sports
3:16 am
Sun April 7, 2013

An NCAA Basketball Star In Europe

Greg Nelson Sports Illustrated/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 2:37 pm

With a single, devastating shot, Ali Farokhmanesh became the face of the NCAA basketball tournament in 2010.

He nailed the 3-pointer that propelled the ninth-seeded Northern Iowa Panthers to a major upset victory over the tournament favorite, Kansas Jayhawks. It also put him on the cover of Sports Illustrated.

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Sports
3:16 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Old Guard And Fresh Faces Square Off At Women's Final Four

Louisville guard Shoni Schimmel (23) and the Louisville bench react to her 3-point shot against Tennessee in the second half of the regional final in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Oklahoma City on Tuesday. Louisville won 86-78.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 10:51 am

A women's Final Four without Baylor, Stanford or Tennessee? That's happened only one other time in the last dozen years. We've become so used to it being a power party, that it's downright disorienting.

Or maybe that's just vertigo from trying to track the movements of the Final Four's breakout star, Louisville guard Shoni Schimmel. She's a big reason why two of those teams — Tennessee and Baylor — aren't in New Orleans for a chance at the title.

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Politics
2:59 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Back From Recess, Congress Preps For Gun Legislation Fight

Congress comes back from a two-week spring break on Monday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 10:45 am

The U.S. Senate was scheduled to begin voting on gun control measures this week when Congress returns from recess, but Senate staffers say a bipartisan agreement has yet to be reached on universal background checks. That snarl may end up delaying a vote on gun legislation for another week, as lobbyists on both sides of the debate use the extra time to keep the pressure on.

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Commentary
2:57 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Why You Shouldn't Wrinkle Your Nose At Fermentation

Kimchi is a traditional pungent fermented Korean dish made of vegetables with a variety of seasonings.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

It's delicious, it's nutritious and it's basically rotten. Fermentation is a hot culinary trend, and, as Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf explains, the preservation process gives food a flavor unique to time and place.

People you know may intentionally be growing bacteria in their homes — on food, outside the refrigerator. And they are doing it to make food safe, and nutritious.

They are doing what cooks have always done: fermenting food.

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Shots - Health News
10:30 am
Sat April 6, 2013

With Plan B Ruling, Judge Signs Off On Years Of Advocacy

A federal judge has ordered the Food and Drug Administration to make all levonorgestrel-based emergency contraceptives available to younger teens without a prescription.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 9:08 am

A federal judge ordered Friday what women's groups have failed to accomplish politically for a dozen years. He ruled that Plan B, the most commonly used morning-after birth control pill, be sold without a prescription or other restrictions to women of all ages.

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NPR Story
8:25 am
Sun March 31, 2013

1970s Chaos And Radicalism Fuels 'Flamethrowers'

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 12:51 pm

Rachel Kushner's new novel, The Flamethrowers, begins with a crash. A young woman named Reno is trying to set a record on her motorcycle at a racetrack at the Bonneville Salt Flats. She wants to photograph the tracks she leaves in the sand, as an art project. But her crash takes Reno in a different direction. Her artistic ambition thrusts her in the middle of New York's chaotic art scene in the 1970s, and eventually, Reno finds herself embroiled in a radical political movement in Italy.

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NPR Story
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Want To Remember New York In The '90s? Pick Up The Phone

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

New York City has nearly 11,000 pay phones, and a new campaign is trying to turn about 5,000 of them into time capsules. Host Rachel Martin talks with David Droga, creative chairman of ad agency Droga5, about the "Recalling 1993" campaign.

NPR Story
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Phil Ramone's 'Musical Mind' Set Him Apart As A Producer

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

Phil Ramone was a violin prodigy; he played for Queen Elizabeth when he was 10. As a fledgling recording engineer, he manned the booth for "Alice's Restaurant." And as a producer, he recorded hits for Frank Sinatra, Billy Joel and Paul Simon. As NPR's Sami Yenigun reports, Ramone died Saturday at the age of 79.

NPR Story
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

How A 'Drone Court' Might Work

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

In recent months, there have been bipartisan calls for more transparency in the Obama administration's drone program. Host Rachel Martin talks with Gregory McNeal, a professor of national security law at Pepperdine University's School of Law, about proposals to bring more openness and accountability. One idea is the creation of a "drone court" that would review decisions to target and kill suspected militants.

Author Interviews
7:40 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Love, Roughhousing And Fifth Position In 'Brothers Emanuel'

The brothers in the Emanuel family are known for their success and for their chutzpah. The youngest is Ari Emanuel, a high-powered Hollywood agent. The HBO show Entourage actually based a character on Ari, and that character is a bit, well, blunt — threatening, for example, to rip out someone's tongue and serve it to his son's pet lizard.

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Sports
6:05 am
Sun March 24, 2013

On Scraping By And The Close-Game Science

In the NCAA men's basketball tournament Saturday, Marquette escaped with a 2-point win over Butler. What does it take to win a close game? Grit and determination? Luck? Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca, who was at the game.

Religion
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

For Evangelical Leader, Gay Marriage 'Outside Of God's Design'

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

This week, the Supreme Court begins hearing arguments in two cases that could determine the future of gay marriage in this country. In a few moments, NPR's Nina Totenberg brings us the story of a prominent Republican from the George W. Bush administration who's now working against many in his own party to legalize gay marriage.

But first, another point of view from one of the country's leading evangelical Christian leaders.

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Sports
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Make Way For Ducks, Out To Prove They're A Better Seed

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:05 am

There's a team in the NCAA men's basketball tournament making some noise in the West. The Oregon Ducks, seeded 12th in their region, now have two double-digit wins over much higher-seeded teams. NPR's Tom Goldman reports from San Jose, Calif.

Asia
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Musharraf Returns To Pakistan Amid Threats

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 3:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf has returned home after four years of self-imposed exile in Dubai and London. Security was unusually tight as he arrived at Karachi Airport today. The Pakistani Taliban has issued threats to kill the former president. And a Pakistani court has named Musharraf for possible involvement in the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. Joining us now from Islamabad is NPR's Julie McCarthy. Hi, Julie.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Hi.

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Law
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Parent Navigates Personal Grief In Broader Gun Debate

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:05 am

Tom Mauser's son, Daniel, was killed at Columbine High School in 1999. Mauser, who has been an outspoken advocate for gun control since then, speaks with host Rachel Martin.

NPR Story
7:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

The Beat Goes On: Titanic Band Leader's Violin Verified

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

An auction house in Britain announced this week it has authenticated a violin they believe belonged to Wallace Hartley, the band leader aboard the Titanic, who famously continued playing, even as the ship went down. Host Rachel Martin talks about the find and the seven-year process it took to authenticate it.

Middle East
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Fear And Daily Struggles: Reporter Reflects On Iraq War

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: It was early 2003: Doctors reported the first known case of the SARS virus; the musical "Chicago" won the Oscar for Best Picture; and Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice and President George W. Bush made their case for war.

DICK CHENEY: There is no doubt that Saddam Hussein now has weapons of mass destruction.

CONDOLEEZZA RICE: We don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud.

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Middle East
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Reframing The Argument: Brokering Middle East Peace

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:16 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Palestinian scholar Rashid Khalidi has closely watched the role of the United States as mediator in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In his new book "Brokers of Deceit," he argues that U.S. involvement has made the goal of a lasting peace less attainable than ever. Rashid Khalidi is with us now from our studios in New York.

Welcome to the program.

RASHID KHALIDI: Thank you, Rachel.

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Politics
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Planning Trips Worthy Of A President

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

President Obama's trip to Israel presents all sorts of diplomatic difficulties, as we've heard. And there are plenty of logistical challenges too. That's a job for the White House advance team, responsible for planning and executing every scheduling and security detail of the president's trips at home and abroad, down to the minute.

Spencer Geissinger served eight years as President George W. Bush's advance man. His travels took him to over 98 foreign countries. He gave us a sense of what the work entails.

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History
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Sifting Through The World Of Locks, And Those Who Pick Them

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Is there such a thing as a lock than cannot be picked? Host Rachel Martin talks with Tom Vanderbilt of Slate about the quest.

Sunday Puzzle
1:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Take Your Pics

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with the letters P-I and the second word starts with C. For example, given "One of 27 compositions by Mozart" you would say "(Pi)ano (C)oncerto."

Last week's challenge: Think of two familiar three-word sayings in which all three words are the same length. The middle word in both sayings is the same. In each saying, the first and last words rhyme with each other. What two sayings are these?

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Arts & Life
9:20 am
Sun March 10, 2013

It's 'Literally' In The Dictionary

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to take a moment now to talk about a word - yep, one word. Maybe you use it all the time or maybe you feel people use the word and it drives you up the wall. I'm talking about the word literally.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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