NPR's Weekend Edition on KUER 1

Weekends from 6:00am to 10:00am
Scott Simon and Liane Hansen

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a64de1c85e3e649c232c|5182a647e1c85e3e649c231b

Podcasts

Pages

Sports
5:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

The NFL Draft: Football's Dog And Pony Show

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEM MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 78th Annual National Football League players' selection meeting, what you probably think of as the NFL draft, well, it wrapped up yesterday. And NPR's Mike Pesca, who is our top pick, was monitoring as it played out over the last three days.

Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Ah, thank you.

MARTIN: You're welcome.

PESCA: Its swell to be a top pick

MARTIN: It was close.

PESCA: I'm putting on the WESUN hat right now.

Read more
Author Interviews
4:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Making Gains Abroad 'Begins At Home'

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

There's been a lot of talk about a red line this past week and whether the regime of Bashar al-Assad in Syria has crossed it. After U.S. intelligence reports came out saying with varying degrees of confidence that Syrian forces have used chemical weapons on rebels and civilians, President Obama said he is still weighing America's response.

Read more
Analysis
4:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Leading Senate Democrat Has Concerns With U.S. Drones

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Code Switch
3:13 am
Sun April 28, 2013

For Some Young Latinos: Donkey Jaws And Latino Roots

Marco Santiago plays a quijada in his home.
Farida Jhabvala Romero Radio Bilingue

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:40 pm

We love hearing stories of how you straddle all the different cultures in your life. That's why we're sharing this report, about retro-acculturation, from our friends at Latino USA.

The process of integrating into mainstream America is a complex one if you are an immigrant. Often, people lose touch with their country of origin.

But for people like Marco Polo Santiago, the reverse is also true. Second, third and fourth-generation immigrants are seeking out their roots and creating a trend of their own.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

New Jersey Homeowners Say Flood Maps Will Add Huge Costs

A home damaged by Superstorm Sandy in Union Beach, N.J., sits on a raised platform to protect it from future flooding.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Superstorm Sandy pummeled the East Coast six months ago, and, as with other natural disasters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency was there from day one, finding people temporary shelter and later supporting rebuilding efforts.

FEMA also has a lesser-known role. It oversees the creation of flood maps, which model the risk of flooding in different areas during storms. These maps are also used to set building codes and flood insurance rates. In New York and New Jersey, FEMA is updating those maps, and so far many homeowners don't like what they are seeing.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Vermont To FEMA: Put Our Flooding On Your Maps

A house destroyed by Tropical Storm Irene sits in Rochester, Vt., in 2011.
John Curran AP

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

People in Vermont affected by floods in recent years now wish they could be included on the Federal Emergency Management Agency's flood maps.

The maps for the state are old and don't include flooding from fast-rising rivers and streams, the kind of flooding that tore up Vermont during Tropical Storm Irene.

Karin Hardy's house, built in 1850, once stood in Jamaica, Vt., across from the tranquil Ball Mountain Brook. But when Irene hit in August 2011, she heard boulders tumbling.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

House Leadership Crashes Into Outside Hurdles On Bills

House Speaker John Boehner speaks to the media during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill on April 18.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

The House was set to vote this week on a bill modifying the president's health care law. The Republican bill was supported by the leadership, but ran into trouble and was pulled from the floor before the scheduled vote.

It's an example of the kind of obstacles Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, faces in getting legislation through the House. In many recent cases, his problem hasn't been the Democrats as much as members of his own party, backed by proudly conservative outside groups.

Read more
Remembrances
9:08 am
Mon April 22, 2013

'Mixed Up Files' Author E.L. Konigsburg Dies At 83

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:22 am

From The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler introduced us to a spunky kid who, bored with the Connecticut suburbs, runs away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Konigsburg wrote more than 20 other books for children and won two Newbery medals. She died Friday at the age of 83.

Explosions At Boston Marathon
2:56 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Concerns Raised With Legal Issues In Bombing Case

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings remains hospitalized this morning. He's being treated for injuries sustained in a gun battle with police leading up to his capture. At the same time - the legal case against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is taking shape.

Read more
Sports
2:56 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Underdogs Shine In Early Stages Of NBA Playoffs

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: We have officially begun the long, winnowing process known as the NBA playoffs. The first games were last night. NPR's Mike Pesca was watching. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

MARTIN: So, let's recap the results for those of us who were not glued to our televisions last night. Who won?

Read more
The Sunday Conversation
1:54 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

One Amputee's Message Of Hope For Boston's Bombing Victims

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

As Lindsay Ess watched the events in Boston unfold last week, she wondered if she could help the victims of the Marathon bombing. When she found out that many had lost limbs in the explosion, she knew she could.

Ess is a quadruple amputee. In 2006, she was diagnosed with Crohn's disease. She underwent surgery for her condition, but it went terribly wrong. She developed septic shock, which lead to complete organ failure. She was in the intensive care unit for five months.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:02 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Boston Slowly Returns To Sense Of Normalcy

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Boston and surrounding communities, things are getting back to normal after a frightening week. NPR's David Schaper found the mood of the city reflected by the people at yesterday's Red Sox game at Boston's iconic Fenway Park.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: The police and security presence here at Fenway Park is certainly greater than it usually is, but these Bostonians don't seem to mind at all because nothing says things are getting back to normal more than Red Sox baseball and...

Read more
Around the Nation
5:38 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Author Dennis Lehane Reflects On Boston's Tense Week

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Novelist Dennis Lehane is one of many Boston residents trying to absorb events of the past week. Lehane set many of his novels in his hometown, including "Mystic River," and his latest, "Live by Night." Earlier in the week, he set out to explain the resilience of his hometown in an op-ed in the New York Times. It was titled "Messing with the Wrong City." He was one of the hundreds of thousands who spent Friday on lockdown. We spoke with Dennis Lehane from his home yesterday. And I asked him what it was like to be a Bostonian this week.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:38 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Runners Honor Victims Of Marathon Bombing

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

An Unforgettable Week, For Boston And The Nation

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

'Orphan': A Novel Imagines Life In North Korea

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Last week, a book called "The Orphan Master's Son" was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Adam Johnson's novel imagines what life is like for citizens of North Korea. I spoke with Adam Johnson last year about his book. And to mark his Pulitzer, we'd like to revisit that interview. In it, Johnson explained that as part of his research, he actually managed to finagle a visit to North Korea. He said his government minders maintained tight control over his itinerary but they couldn't hide everything.

Read more
Food
4:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

There's More To Rhubarb Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you're a regular public radio listener, this may sound a bit familiar.

GARRISON KEILLOR, HOST:

This portion of our show is brought to you by Beopareebopp Rhubarb Pie and Beopareebopp Frozen Pie Filling.

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: That's Garrison Keillor on "A Prairie Home Companion," advertising a fictional and deeply Lake Wobegonian dessert.

KEILLOR: (Singing) Mama's little baby loves rhubarb, rhubarb, Beebopareebop Rhubarb Pie. Mama's little baby...

Read more
Sports
9:04 am
Sun April 14, 2013

A Controversial Drop Puts Woods Behind On Final Day Of Masters

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is the final round of The Masters today. American Brandt Snedeker and Argentine Angel Cabrera share the lead at 7 under par. Pre-tournament favorite Tiger Woods is four shots behind, which isn't bad considering what he went through yesterday. From Augusta, Georgia, NPR's Tom Goldman reports on how golf's greatest major almost lost its greatest player.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Fore, please. Tiger Woods now driving.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

Read more
Music Interviews
9:04 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Yeah Yeah Yeahs On Love Songs, New York And Transforming On Stage

Yeah Yeah Yeahs' new album is titled Mosquito.
Dan Martensen Courtesy of the artist

Read more
Education
5:34 am
Sun April 14, 2013

The Case For The Arts In Overhauling Education

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:04 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For a lot of kids in grade school, the one class they might actually call fun is art class, or music. Most parents would probably also agree that having their children exposed to art and music during the school day is a good thing. It might be the only break students get from studying for their next test. But there are lots of people who believe the value of arts education is far greater than just play time.

Read more
Science
4:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

A Poker Players Tells Are In The Hands As Much As The Face

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's talk poker. Dealer, let me see those cards.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "COOL HAND LUKE")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (as character) King-three, you got a four. Queen-deuce gets a five. And a pair of sevens gets a john. And the big ace gets a slap in the face. OK, you still do the talking.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

On The Road With Dawes, The Band Behind The Band

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:49 am

The country rock band Dawes has built a grassroots following opening for other bands. As they release their third album, Stories Don't End, they're preparing to tour with their biggest headliner yet: Bob Dylan. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks two members of Dawes, singer and guitarist Taylor Goldsmith and keyboardist Tay Strathairn, about life on the road.

Asia
4:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Will Lightning Strike Twice For K-Pop's PSY?

South Korean rapper PSY performs at his concert in Seoul, South Korea on Saturday.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 5:03 pm

There was another big story on the Korean peninsula over the weekend, but it wasn't about the guy in the north with the missiles and the threats. No, this story was about the guy in the south with the shades and the goofy dance moves, South Korean K-Pop star PSY.

Read more
The Sunday Conversation
3:16 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Advice On Passion, Brilliance And Bugs In 'Letters'

Boy with magnifying glass
Pamela Albin Moore iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:04 am

Edward O. Wilson has spent a lifetime as a scientist, a teacher and a writer. In his scientific career, he's a preeminent biologist and a global expert on ants; as a teacher, he has been a professor at Harvard for almost six decades; as a writer, he has won two Pulitzer Prizes for his nonfiction, which presents science to a general audience.

Read more
Middle East
3:12 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Syria Conflict Brings Middle East Leaders To White House

A Syrian rebel patrols the area in the Sheikh Maqsud district of the northern city of Aleppo, on Thursday.
Dimitar Dilkoff AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 1:54 pm

In the coming weeks, the Obama administration plays host to the leaders of several Middle Eastern nations, including the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Qatar and Jordan.

They are coming, in part, to register their concerns about the ongoing violence in Syria and to nudge the Obama administration to do more to tip the balance in favor of the rebels trying to oust President Bashar Assad.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:09 am
Sun April 14, 2013

In Hazleton, A Mixed Welcome For City's Immigrants

Roads End bar on Broad Street in Hazleton, Pa., displays a sign in 2007 that reads "ALL Legals Served." Longtime residents of the city are divided over the recent influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:33 pm

Many residents say Hazleton, Pa., continues life now as a divided city. While some Spanish-speakers build new lives, longtime residents remain split on how the influx has changed their home.

It's not hard to find a Latino business in Hazleton these days, including law firms, insurance agencies and even a migrant education program. Amilcar Arroyo, the publisher of a local Spanish-language newspaper, says Latinos are now firmly establishing themselves as a part of the city.

Read more
Education
2:58 am
Sun April 14, 2013

'Core' Curriculum Puts Education Experts At Odds

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:16 pm

At 2 p.m., it's crunchtime for students who write for The Harbinger Online, the award-winning, student news site at Shawnee Mission East High just outside Kansas City, Kan. They've been investigating an initiative to develop common curriculum and test guidelines for states.

The young reporters have pored over countless documents about the Common Core State Standards and talked to Kansas state legislators who pushed for their adoption, trying to understand why they're necessary.

Read more
Education
2:58 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Jazz In The Cafeteria: Kids Learn To Listen While They Chomp

Saxophonist Harold Rapp plays during lunchtime at Alice Terry Elementary School in Sheridan, Colo.
Jenny Brundin for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 4:44 pm

School lunch is often synonymous with loud noise. Studies have shown the decibel level in some cafeterias is as high as a lawn mower.

Every so often, though, students at Alice Terry Elementary School, southwest of Denver, are asked not to make any noise.

When the music teacher told students here they'd occasionally have a "silent" lunch break, this was kindergartner Alyssa Norquette's reaction: "Why do we need a silent lunch? Is it because we're too loud or something?"

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:57 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Scientists Race To Stay Ahead Of New Bird Flu Virus

Workers prepare an H7N9 virus detection kit at the Center for Disease Control in Beijing on April 3.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 7:01 am

A precious package arrived at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last Thursday afternoon.

Inside, packed in dry ice to keep it frozen, was a vial containing millions of viruses derived from a 35-year-old Chinese housewife who died last Tuesday of respiratory and kidney failure.

Read more
NPR Story
4:42 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Court Rejects Case To Ban Egyptian Comic's Show

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 9:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Egypt, Bassem Youssef has built a following by making jokes about his own government.

BASSEM YOUSSEF: (Foreign language spoken)

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: That's a bit of sound from Youssef's satirical TV show, which often gets compared to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." His sharp critiques of the president and the ruling political party in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood, have made him famous. But his show has also stirred up controversy.

Read more

Pages