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Heavy Rotation
6:09 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

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Download Valerie June's "Workin' Woman Blues" in this month's edition of Heavy Rotation.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:31 pm

  • WWNO's Gwen Thompkins on "Ballet Class" by Jason Marsalis

Another month, another great mix of new music chosen by public radio's top DJs. Download an explosive new track from Neko Case, discover the Shabazz Palaces-approved Seattle rapper Porter Ray and get to know Valerie June, one of public radio's frontrunners for Best New Artist of 2013. Grab all 10 of our picks below, as chosen by the following contributors:

  • Chris Campbell, DJ at WDET's ALPHA channel in Detroit
  • Lars Gotrich, producer and host of Viking's Choice at NPR Music
  • Anne Litt, DJ at KCRW in Los Angeles
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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Indiana State Fair To Feature Giant Popcorn Ball

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. In China it's the Year of the Snake. In Indiana, it's the year of popcorn. This year's state fair will feature, what else, a giant popcorn ball. A company called Snax in Pax is using a mold that's eight-feet wide. Owner Will Huggins says it will be edible but he doesn't recommend taking a bite. Maybe because it'll be a little stale.

Around the Nation
4:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Volunteers Sought For 1813 Flag Project

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The Fourth of July weekend is over, but celebrations continue, and I'm not talking about left-over fireworks. The Maryland Historical Society is recreating the flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore 200 years ago. Mary Pickersgill and four others sewed the original Star Spangled Banner in 1813. Now volunteers will recreate it using the same type of fabric, stitching and time frame. They have six weeks to complete the 30-by-40 foot flag.

NPR Story
2:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Vibraphone Showcased In Jason Marsalis' 'Ballet Class'

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:03 am

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. David Greene introduces listeners to member station WWNO's Gwen Thompkins — she's NPR's former East Africa correspondent. Her choice for July's installment of "Heavy Rotation," is "Ballet Class" by the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet.

NPR Story
2:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Britain's Own Andy Murray Wins Men's Title At Wimbledon

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People in Britain are celebrating a new Wimbledon tennis champion this morning, a man born on their own soil.

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Game, that's a match...

GREENE: That's early applause from the crowd yesterday, just before Andy Murray won in straight sets beating Novak Djokovic. Murray's victory ends 77 years of heartbreak. The last Brit to win the Wimbledon men's title: Fred Perry in 1936.

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NPR Story
2:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Congress Called On To Reverse Student Loan Rate Increase

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:02 pm

Rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans, which help low and middle-income college students, doubled on July 1. There is now pressure for a deal to undo the increase. NPR's David Greene talks to Matthew Chingos, a fellow at the Brookings Institution's Brown Center on Education Policy.

Parallels
1:52 am
Mon July 8, 2013

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:12 pm

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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Shots - Health News
1:42 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Finding Simple Tests For Brain Disorders Turns Out To Be Complex

Anne Jones, 62, and Robin Jones, 73, at their home in Menlo Park, Calif. He took a test that revealed proteins typical of Alzheimer's disease.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:17 am

If you're having chest pain, your doctor can test you for a heart attack. If you're having hip pain, your doctor could test for osteoarthritis.

But what if you're depressed? Or anxious? Currently there are no physical tests for most disorders that affect the mind. Lab tests like these could transform the field of mental illness. So far efforts to come up with biomarkers for common mental health disorders have proved largely fruitless.

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Parallels
1:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Call Centers Call On Multilingual Portuguese

New employees train for call center work at Teleperformance Portugal, an outsourcing company in Lisbon. The outsourcing industry is adding thousands of jobs while other Portuguese industries shed them.
Jose Faria Courtesy of Teleperformance Portugal

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:04 am

Filipa Neves speaks five languages but still couldn't find steady work in her native Portugal. So she was about to move to Angola, a former Portuguese colony in Africa, where the economy is booming.

But she sent off one last resumé — to a call center. It was sort of a last resort. She'd heard the stereotype.

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Middle East
10:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Shootings Reported At Demonstrations In Egypt

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

This is a week when Egypt is divided on what democracy means. In what amounted to a second uprising, millions of Egyptians poured into the streets to demand that their democratically elected president step down. When he balked, the army ousted Mohamed Morsi, which led his supporters to say it is a dark day for democracy there. Today, thousands of Morsi supporters are out protesting that military coup, in demonstrations that have reportedly turned violent.

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Business
10:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

June Jobs Report Exceeds Expectations, But Concerns Remain

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the jobs report.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

The Salt
9:16 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

An ancient wild barley sample recovered from Chogha Golan, Iran.
Courtesy of TISARP/Science

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 9:46 am

Archaeologists digging in the foothills of Iran's Zagros Mountains have discovered the remains of a Stone Age farming community. It turns out that people living there were growing plants like barley, peas and lentils as early as 12,000 years ago.

The findings offer a rare snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming. They also show that Iran was an important player in the origin of agriculture.

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World
5:15 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Fancy Table Setting Sells For $3 Million At Auction

Back in 1922, the Maharaja of Patiala commissioned a new dining set ahead of a visit to India by the Prince of Wales. That silver-gilt set — 1,400 pieces — has sold at auction for $3 million. The prince later became King Edward VIII.

Around the Nation
5:06 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Boy Saved From Drowning By Woman Posing For Engagement Photo

Becki Salmon and her fiancé were posing on the banks of a fast-moving creek in a Philadelphia park. That is until a five-year-old boy started drowning right behind them, reports WPVI TV. Salmon, who's a trained lifeguard, jumped into the water and saved the boy.

Education
2:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Education Reform Movement Learns Lesson From Old Standards

Advocates for Common Core standards say it will be harder for states to hide their failing schools.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 8:08 am

Common Core — the new set of national education standards in math and English language arts — will take effect in most states next year. This move toward a single set of standards has been embraced by a bipartisan crowd of politicians and educators largely because of what the Common Core standards are replacing: a mess.

In years past, the education landscape was a discord of state standards. A fourth grader in Arkansas could have appeared proficient in reading by his state's standards — but, by the standards of another state, say Massachusetts, not even close.

Read more
Movie Interviews
2:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Oscar Winners Rash And Faxon Team Up Again For 'The Way, Way Back'

Duncan's summer is filled with awkward — and often adult-initiated — situations involving the girl next door (Annasophia Robb).
Claire Folger Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:13 pm

The coming-of-age story is a summer-movie staple — as writers Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, who struck Oscar gold with The Descendants in 2011, can attest.

Their latest film, The Way, Way Back, is another entry in the canon; it's the tale of an awkward teenager, Duncan, who's floundering through a seaside vacation when he's taken under the wing of Owen, the sweetly demented manager of a summer water park. Comedy ensues — and in passing, Duncan learns some important lessons about adulthood.

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Media
2:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Louisville TV Station Promises Not To Hype Breaking News

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In local television news, one of the most basic ways to appeal to viewers is the constant promise of breaking news. As NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports, one station in Louisville, Kentucky is taking a different approach and it's beginning to win attention for it.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The spot is for WDRB television in Louisville.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SPOT)

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National Security
1:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

NSA's Reach Leads To Calls For Updated Eavesdropping Laws

National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, Md.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 8:18 am

The continuing leak of classified information by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has renewed a debate about the U.S. government's power to reach secretly into the personal lives of its citizens.

But there is at least one point on which both privacy advocates and security experts agree: The laws governing electronic eavesdropping have not kept pace with technology.

Read more
Law
1:35 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Whose Term Was It? A Look Back At The Supreme Court

Chief Justice John G. Roberts (left) and Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:03 am

It would not be an exaggeration to call the recently completed Supreme Court term a lollapalooza. Day-by-day on the last week of the court term, the justices handed down one legal thunderbolt after another: same-sex marriage, voting rights, affirmative action. The end-of-term crush of opinions made so many headlines that other important decisions got little public notice.

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Europe
1:34 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Are Things Too Cozy In London's 'City' Within A City?

Skyscrapers in the City of London, the heart of the financial district, are reshaping the skyline.
Dan Bobkoff NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 12:33 pm

For at least a millennium, the heart of Britain's commercial and financial industries has been the City of London.

The City is not the large metropolis we know as London. It's much older and smaller. Many call it the Square Mile, though it's not square and a bit bigger than a mile. It's the home to big banks, medieval alleyways and St. Paul's Cathedral. And, for all those centuries, the area has had the same local government with an unusual name: The City of London Corporation.

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On Aging
12:06 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Seniors Flex Creative Muscles In Retirement Arts Colonies

Buster Sussman, 86, shown with his art instructor, Randall Williams, is a former real estate reporter who only recently started painting. His paintings were on display at the Burbank Senior Artists Colony.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 2:51 am

Some famous writers, painters and musicians have done some of their best work in their later years — impressionist Claude Monet, for one. But at the North Hollywood Senior Arts Colony, older people are proving that you don't have to be famous — or even a professional artist — to live a creatively fulfilling life in old age.

With a fully equipped theater and painting and sculpture studios, there seems to be rehearsals or exhibitions of some sort going on here all the time.

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StoryCorps
11:39 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Two Brothers Remember Lives Spent With Liberty

The Bizzaro brothers — James, 81 (left) and Paul, 82 — spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 2:51 am

Brothers Paul and James Bizzaro, both in their 80s, spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to the same small island in New York Harbor as Lady Liberty 75 years ago this summer, not long after their father, also James, became a guard at the statue.

When the Bizzaros moved to what's now called Liberty Island in 1937, Paul was 8 and James was 6.

"Half of the island was for the visitors. The half that we lived in, we had that whole half to us," says James.

Read more
Planet Money
8:03 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Why Doesn't Everybody Buy Cheap, Generic Headache Medicine?

Same pills. Lower price.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 7:03 pm

Why does anyone buy Bayer aspirin — or Tylenol, or Advil — when, almost always, there's a bottle of cheaper generic pills, with the same active ingredient, sitting right next to the brand-name pills?

Matthew Gentzkow, an economist at the University of Chicago's Booth school, recently tried to answer this question. Along with a few colleagues, Gentzkow set out to test a hypothesis: Maybe people buy the brand-name pills because they just don't know that the generic version is basically the same thing.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Stars, Spangles And Lots Of Security At Boston's July 4 Events

Mary Ann Rollings (from left), Gloria Kelley and Linda Lee Stacy were bursting in red, white and blue as they turned out to hear their beloved Boston Pops.
Courtesy of Sammy Stalcup

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 11:43 am

The Fourth of July show will go on as usual tonight in Boston. For the 40th year in a row, the Boston Pops will perform along the banks of the Charles River as fireworks burst overhead.

But the scene and the mood will be different, with heavy security measures in the wake of the recent Boston Marathon bombings. It's in the back of many people's minds that the July 4 celebration was apparently the original target until, police say, the bombers decided to attack the race instead.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:47 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Park Service Cleans Up Eggs In Death Valley

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:21 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Strike In Oakland Causes Parking Meter Confusion

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You ever sense a smile on the face of people who write your parking tickets, as if they enjoy calling you out for letting your meter expire? When Oakland, California cities employees went on a one day strike, residence thought that meant no parking enforcement. But one parking officer decided to cross the picket line and write tickets. He said he was happy with his pay and didn't want to go on strike. Employee of the Month, no, the city said all of the tickets he wrote would be voided.

Around the Nation
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

The Declaration: What Does Independence Mean To You?

Kara, Michael, Mikaila and Cameron Milton of Greensboro, N.C., pose for a portrait near the Lincoln Memorial on June 21, after reading the Declaration of Independence for Morning Edition.
Erica Yoon NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

We often celebrate Independence Day with backyard barbecues and fireworks, forgetting the document that started this whole country: the Declaration of Independence.

For the past 20 years Morning Edition has asked NPR hosts and reporters to read the document on the Fourth, as a reminder of our country's history. This year, we decided to ask visitors at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to give it a try.

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Law
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Zimmerman Trial Takes July 4 Off, Case Resumes Friday

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's get an update now on the Trayvon Martin murder case being held in Sanford, Florida. The state is expected soon to wrap up its case against George Zimmerman. He's the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed the unarmed teenager. In a week and a half of testimony, prosecutors have painted a picture of Zimmerman as a wannabe cop, someone who profiled Trayvon Martin and then, after he shot Martin, tailored his story to fit Florida's self-defense law.

NPR's Greg Allen reports.

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Race
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Mexican Roots Bind Families Who Settled Early In Texas

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:19 pm

Unlike many places in America where Latinos are a relatively new minority group, Texas Hispanics were there before white Anglos. In some ways, having once been part of Mexico has lessened the tensions between whites and Latinos. But that's not always the case.

(For an extended version of this story, along with a gallery of images, visit KERA's website: Latino Roots Run Deeper In Texas.)

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Business
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

SoftBank Moves Closer To 78 Percent Stake In Sprint

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Federal Communications Commission has apparently approved a deal giving the Japanese telecom giant SoftBank a controlling stake in SprintNextel, which is the third-largest wireless operator in the U.S. Experts say SoftBank's industry clout should help Sprint become a more robust competitor. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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