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Podcasts

  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 4:08am
    The pup was discovered 100 miles from the ocean. It mostly likely swam up the San Joaquin River, hopped out and couldn't find its way back.
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 3:31am
    In 1954, the Supreme Court outlawed segregation. David Greene talks to ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones about her story in The Atlantic. She examines the failure of school desegregation.
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 3:07am
    Does having younger managers really mean a company is more innovative? An analysis of innovation at private companies in the United States and across the world finds an inverse relationship correlation between disruptive innovation and the age of managers at those companies.
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 3:07am
    There's a new idea making the rounds in education circles. It's called Pay It Forward. The idea is states would allow students to go to college for free then they would pay back a percentage of their salaries after they graduate. But what's the downside?
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 3:07am
    Secretary of State John Kerry is in Geneva to meet with his diplomatic counterparts from Russia, Ukraine and the European Union. They are trying to find a resolution to the crisis in Ukraine. The talks come as Ukraine deploys military force against pro-Russian militants in the country's east.

Pages

Music Interviews
12:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Robert Randolph Ushers In Steel-Guitar Soul With 'Lickety Split'

Robert Randolph & The Family Band's new album, Lickety Split, is out Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:22 am

The 33-year-old frontman of Robert Randolph & The Family Band has strong roots in gospel music. As a kid, he grew up attending the House of God church in Orange, N.J. That's where he first played the "sacred steel" guitar, a driving force behind the band's soulful new album, Lickety Split.

In the 1920s, African-American Pentecostal churches began using the steel guitar in place of an organ. From there, it became an instrument that helped usher in a new gospel style.

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World
4:51 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Canadian Town Is Nuts For Taters

Florenceville-Bristol produces about a third of the world's frozen french fries. So, of course, this tater town celebrated National French Fry Day over the weekend. A huge portrait of the town's covered bridge was unveiled. It was made from 5,700 fries.

Analysis
3:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Obama 'Understated' When Reacting To Zimmerman Verdict

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:17 am

There has been a lot of political reaction to the George Zimmerman verdict, announced Saturday night in Sanford, Fla. Also in the news, it appears the Senate is headed toward a historic vote on changing filibuster rules.

Around the Nation
3:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Rail Industry Vows To Learn From Fiery Accident In Canada

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the Quebec town of Lac-Megantic, a grim search continues this morning amid the ash and debris left after a train carrying oil crashed into the town. As investigators try to figure out what caused the fiery accident, the question has emerged across the border: Could the same thing happen here in the U.S.? NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Around the Nation
3:10 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Norwalk, Conn., Debates Building Project In Floodplain

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's talk about another kind of tragedy: natural disasters. Severe storms seem to becoming more frequently, and this is raising questions once again about the wisdom of building in coastal flood-prone areas. It's an issue for private builders and public officials, like city leaders in Norwalk, Connecticut. They want to upgrade and old housing project in a flood plain using federal dollars. From WSHU, Kaomi Goetz has that story.

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It's All Politics
1:05 am
Mon July 15, 2013

In Second Term, Obama Takes Softer Tone Toward Bushes

President Obama applauds as former first lady Barbara Bush and former President George W. Bush help President George H.W. Bush stand at the opening ceremony of the George W. Bush Presidential Library on April 25 in Dallas. Former first lady Laura Bush looks on.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:10 am

Former President George H.W. Bush will visit the White House on Monday, along with his wife, former first lady Barbara Bush, to celebrate a milestone for Points of Light, a volunteer service organization that got its start during the first Bush administration.

During President Obama's first term, he didn't see much of the Bushes. He met with the former presidents — father, son or both — a total of just five times in four years.

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All Tech Considered
1:04 am
Mon July 15, 2013

How Hackers Tapped Into My Cellphone For Less Than $300

It's easier — and cheaper — than you'd expect to hack a cellphone, say a team of white hat hackers.
iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:57 am

In the wake of the National Security Agency cyber-spying revelations, you may be worrying about the government keeping track of your digital life. But, for less than $300, a group of ordinary hackers found a way to tap right into Verizon cellphones.

This is a group of good-guy, or "white hat", hackers. They hacked the phones to warn wireless carriers that the phones have a security flaw.

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Parallels
1:04 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Iran's New President Hints At Easing Internet Controls

Iranians surf the web at an Internet cafe in Tehran on April 28, 2013. The recently elected president, Hasan Rowhani, has suggested that he may loosen restrictions on the Internet.
Abedin Taherkenareh EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:10 am

Iran's President-elect Hasan Rowhani has already called for less filtering of the Internet, saying Iran must maintain its principles, but also needs to engage with the wider world.

"We should rectify our relations with the world," Rowhani said in remarks carried by Iran's Press TV. "Gone are the days when a wall could be built around the country.... Today there are no more walls."

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Around the Nation
1:02 am
Mon July 15, 2013

A Peek Inside A Once Top Secret Spot In Atomic Age History

Take a tour of the Hanford site, a nuclear production complex in Richland, Wash., and you'll see the hundreds of mechanical water pressure gauges wired to the process tubes inside the core. Tour guide Paul Vinther warns that bumping these gauges could throw off the readings enough to trigger a an emergency shutdown of the reactor.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 9:40 am

People tend to remember that the atomic bomb was developed at Los Alamos, N.M., and Oak Ridge, Tenn., but they often forget about a third nuclear production complex — the Hanford Site in Richland, Wash. It's where they built the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor.

The "B Reactor" is a windowless, cinder block hulk out in the middle of nowhere. You might mistake it for an abandoned cement plant. But inside, it's a lovingly preserved time capsule of the Atomic Age. If you're lucky, your guide will be one of the people who worked here when the place was still new.

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Crime In The City
1:00 am
Mon July 15, 2013

G-Man Fights Crime, And A Medical Disorder, In Kansas City

Author Joel Goldman has found there's plenty of true crime to write about in the Kansas City metro area.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:10 am

Split by the Missouri-Kansas state line, the Kansas City metro area has been home to political bosses, jazz clubs, barbecue joints and tough characters, all of which find their way into author Joel Goldman crime thrillers.

Nine years ago, when Goldman was working as an attorney, he was diagnosed with a movement disorder that makes him shake and stutter at times. So he quit his practice and eventually gave his medical condition to one of his main characters, Kansas City FBI agent Jack Davis.

'Brought To His Knees' In A Hardscrabble Neighborhood

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Planet Money
9:22 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

When Employees Need More Than An Advance On Their Paycheck

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:38 am

Andrew Rosenkranz says at least two or three times a week, he finds himself sitting across from an employee at his market research firm near Seattle, listening to some complicated personal problem.

Just last week, an employee described how her daughter and baby granddaughter were assaulted by a boyfriend. The daughter wanted to come back to Washington state but didn't have money for a plane ticket. And so, Rosenkranz says, the employee "was coming to ask, 'Hey, is there anything you can do to help us here?' "

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Pop Culture
8:35 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Remembering Cory Monteith — Not Finn Hudson In 'Glee'

Cory Monteith, who played Finn in the television series Glee, was found dead Saturday in a hotel room in Canada. He was 31.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:29 pm

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Europe
5:00 am
Fri July 12, 2013

After WikiLeaks Drama, Kremlin Goes Old School

The Kremlin's security agency has bought $15,000 worth of electric typewriters. A source told a Russian newspaper that after WikiLeaks and the Edward Snowden scandal, the Kremlin decided to "expand the practice of creating paper documents."

Around the Nation
4:56 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Calif. City Moves To Freeze Ice Cream Trucks' Music Output

For many kids, the music of ice cream trucks is the sound of summer. For some adults, however, it ruins peace and quiet. The Long Beach City Council has drafted legislation to limit when ice cream trucks can play music.

Code Switch
3:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Oakland Braces For Seeing Subway Shooting On The Big Screen

Fruitvale Station, a new feature film depicting the shooting, multiple times." href="/post/oakland-braces-seeing-subway-shooting-big-screen" class="noexit lightbox">
Cephus "Bobby" Johnson in 2011, when the former transit officer who shot Johnson's nephew, Oscar Grant, was released from jail. Johnson and other family members have seen Fruitvale Station, a new feature film depicting the shooting, multiple times.
Jason Redmond AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:00 pm

It's not often that Oakland, Calif., hosts a movie opening. But there is plenty of anticipation for Fruitvale Station.

The film is about the life and death of Oscar Grant, a young black man who was fatally shot in the back by a white transit police officer in the early morning hours of New Year's Day in 2009.

Grant was killed by Officer Johannes Mehserle, who claimed to have been reaching for his Taser, not his handgun. Mehserle was tried and convicted of involuntary manslaughter and served 11 months of a two-year term.

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Movie Reviews
3:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Pacific Rim' Is Filled To The Brim With Special Effects

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Another movie opening is "Pacific Rim." Critic Kenneth Turan says it has plenty of explosions and special effects, but he says there's actually more to it than most of the other blockbusters this summer.

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Environment
3:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Environmentalists Warn Olympic Games Will Harm Sochi

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 am

Russia is preparing for the 2014 Winter Games — turning a sleepy valley in the Northern Caucasus Mountains into an Olympic village, with brand-new facilities for every Alpine sport. Officials say it will be a world-class destination for winter-sports enthusiasts long after the Games are over. Environmentalists say it's an ecological disaster in the making.

The Two-Way
1:22 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Chuck Foley, Co-Creator Of Twister, Dies At 82

Festivalgoers play a giant game of Twister during the Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts in southwest England last month.
Andrew Cowie AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:40 am

One of the men responsible for getting people tied up in knots while they played Twister has died.

Charles "Chuck" Foley died earlier this month in St. Paul, Minn. He was 82.

Foley and his business partner Neil Rabens invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. The pair originally called it Pretzel, and it was Milton Bradley who came up with the name Twister.

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Parallels
1:19 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Israel's Internal Battle Over Ultra-Orthodox Soldiers

Soldiers close the gate to the tiny West Bank outpost, right next door to a Jewish settlement, where the HaHod platoon of the ultra-Orthodox Netzah Yahuda battalion is stationed.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 6:14 am

Moshe Haim always wanted to be a soldier. The 20-year-old is now a sergeant, more than halfway through three years of service in the Israeli military.

But when he goes home on leave, he doesn't talk about his military experiences to any of his eight siblings, especially his brothers.

"I know that for my parents and my brothers, the first, best choice is to be in the yeshiva and study there," he says at a small West Bank outpost where he's stationed. "It wasn't good for me, but my brothers are still pure."

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Middle East
1:17 am
Fri July 12, 2013

In Southern Syria, Rebels Say U.S. Support Is Critical

Free Syrian Army fighters after a battle against government troops in Zaizoon, near Dera'a, on Feb. 16.
Shaam News Network Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:38 pm

The battle for the city of Dera'a in southern Syria has become a test of an American pledge to give military support to rebels fighting Syrian President Bashar Assad. After a string of defeats, the rebels have scored rare victories around Dera'a.

But in interviews,rebel commanders passing through neighboring Jordan say those gains could be lost without a dependable arms pipeline and promised U.S. support.

Yasser Aboud, a thin, intense former colonel in the Syrian army, commands the joint operations center for southern Syria.

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Planet Money
12:53 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Will A Health Insurer Sponsor The Next 'Jackass' Movie?

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:13 am

Soon, most Americans will have to buy health insurance or pay a fine. This sounds like a marketer's dream: Captive shoppers directed by the government to buy your product. But when the product you're selling is health insurance, there are some pitfalls. Your customers may not love you. In fact, they may despise you.

"I think it may be too little too late for health insurance companies to now come out, like, 'Hey,we were just kidding the last 50 years!,'" says James Percelay, co-founder of the viral marketing firm ThinkModo in New York.

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Code Switch
12:48 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Mary Hamilton, The Woman Who Put The 'Miss' In Court

Mary Hamilton was found in contempt of court in Alabama, when she refused to answer questions after the prosecution addressed her only by her first name. The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled in her favor.
AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:58 am

When the U.S. Supreme Court issues a ruling, its decisions can carry weight for generations. Think about decisions in the civil rights era regarding school segregation and the Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama.

As part of our look back on the summer of 1963, we examine another Alabama case that had a subtle effect on the way courts treat defendants.

At a mock trial at Samford University in Birmingham, a student playing the role of a defense attorney questions his client on the stand: "To your knowledge, can a driver turning left turn on a yellow light?"

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Environment
12:46 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Sweeping Parts Of Southern Seas Could Become A Nature Preserve

The "Giant Tabular Iceberg" floats in Antarctica's Ross Sea in December 2011. Under a proposed new international agreement, large sections of the oceans around Antarctica would become protected as a marine preserve.
Camille Seaman Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:37 pm

The area of ocean set aside as a nature preserve could double or triple in the coming days, depending on the outcome of a meeting in Germany. Representatives from 24 countries and the European Union are considering setting aside large portions of ocean around Antarctica as a protected area. And the deal may hinge on preserving some fishing rights.

There are two proposals on the table: One would set aside huge parts of the Southern Ocean around East Antarctica; the other would focus on the Ross Sea, south of New Zealand.

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StoryCorps
8:03 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

A Father And Daughter 'Keep The Faith' During Cancer Fight

Faith in 2008, on her fifth birthday.
Courtesy of Jerris Marr

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:13 am

For the past three years, StoryCorps' Legacy program has given people facing serious illness the chance to record interviews with loved ones and caregivers. Recently, StoryCorps expanded the program to include children.

In 2007, Faith Marr was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer on her spine. She was 4 years old. That year she had her first of eight surgeries, replacing her vertebrae with titanium rods. Doctors were uncertain about her chances of survival.

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Animals
5:09 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tourists At Kruger National Park Witness High-Speed Chase

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 9:16 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Tourists at South Africa's Kruger National Park witnessed a dramatic high-speed chase - two cheetahs chasing a herd of impala. Impala are African antelope, and of course a Chevy model. And seconds from becoming dinner, one of the impala decided to make a tourist's SUV its getaway car.

Animals
4:17 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Giant Python Snakes His Way Into Thrift Shop

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

A break-in at an Australian thrift store had police stumped. There was a hole in the ceiling and smashed merchandise. Nothing was missing. Not a burglar, possibly a prankster on a rampage. The next day, staff spotted the intruder still in the store. It was a giant python, 19 feet long, 37 pounds, the head the size of a small dog. The local newspaper reported police chose not to handcuff the culprit, quote, "for logistical reasons."

Politics
3:58 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Senators Express Concerns About Smithfield Foods Merger

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. Pork was on the menu on Capitol Hill yesterday, but not the kind Congress produces. Lawmakers on the Senate Agriculture Committee were focused on the takeover of Smithfield Foods by a big Chinese company.

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Law
3:58 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tsarnaev Pleads Not Guilty To Boston Marathon Bombing

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev made a brief appearance in federal court yesterday. He pleaded not guilty to 30 counts in connection with the attack. The charges include using a weapon of mass destruction in an attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. The 19-year-old faces the possibility of the death penalty. NPR's Tovia Smith was in the courtroom.

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Middle East
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

For Those In Aleppo, Syria, Commuting Can Be Lethal

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Many of you, as you're listening, are on your commute to work, perhaps dealing with traffic, maybe waiting for a late train. But imagine for a moment a different commute, one on foot, where to get to work you have to pass through armed security checkpoints, all the while dodging sniper fire. That is the reality for many people in the Syrian city of Aleppo.

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Middle East
3:43 am
Thu July 11, 2013

With President Morsi Out, Gulf States Open Their Checkbooks

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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