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Podcasts

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:48am
    The judge composed a rhyme to let an Oregon man know he'd been found guilty of the crime: stealing a bulldog puppy from its owners at gunpoint.
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:48am
    The former governor faces a fine for exceeding the limit in Wasila, Alaska. She joked that the Sammy Hagar song distracted her, adding, "I wasn't speeding; I was qualifying."
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:05am
    An open revolt among moderate Kansas Republicans has clouded Gov. Sam Brownback's re-election hopes and focused national attention on the tax-cutting experiment at the heart of his "red-state model."
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:01am
    A few months ago, 24-year-old Anas Hamra made a "Happy" video about Gaza. If the rest of the world was playing off Pharrell Williams' song, he figured Gaza ought to step up, too. Plus, even with salty tap water and travel restrictions, life in Gaza was not all misery. On Wednesday, Hamra spent 24 hours with his video camera in Shifa Hospital in Gaza and emerged unable to find a word to describe how he feels. The first song that came to mind is "Wake Me Up When It's Over."
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:01am
    Aaron David Miller of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars talks with Steve Inskeep about Israel's call to demilitarize Gaza and whether such a proposal is realistic.

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Around the Nation
1:35 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Can Marriage Save Single Mothers From Poverty?

New census figures showing a link between single motherhood and poverty have some analysts touting marriage as a means to curb poverty. But others say it's not so simple.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 12:05 pm

Newly released census figures show a long-standing and glaring contrast: A third of families headed by single mothers are in poverty, and they are four times more likely than married-couple families to be poor. The disparity is on the rise, and as the number of single mothers grows, analysts are debating if more marriages could mean less poverty.

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Music
1:35 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Another Reason To Skip Sleep: Indian Classical Music

Tabla player and concert organizer Samir Chatterjee plays alongside flutist Ronu Majumdar at Chhandayan's annual all-night concert in New York City in May.
Dibyarka Chatterjee

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:23 pm

Here's a typical Saturday night for a music fan in Manhattan: You go grab some dinner, and then go to a show. You hang out there for an hour or two, enjoy the music and then leave, right? But what would happen if, instead, the musicians onstage took turns soloing for an hour or more apiece, and you wound up staying until dawn?

Samir Chatterjee is a tabla player, and every spring, he invites musicians from India and elsewhere to come to New York for marathon concerts that start in the early evening and last all night long.

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Planet Money
12:16 am
Thu September 13, 2012

The Fed's Other Big Power

Give us a sign.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:06 pm

We think of the power of the Federal Reserve as the power of money. After all, the Fed is the one institution that can create U.S. dollars out of thin air.

But recently, Ben Bernanke has argued that the Fed has another, critical power: the power of words. And when you're the chairman of the Fed, a few words can go a long way.

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Economy
12:03 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Fed Stimulus Expected, But Remedy May Not Be Right

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke in a hearing of the Joint Economic Committee on Capitol Hill in June.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 7:02 am

Federal Reserve policymakers are meeting in Washington, trying to decide whether — and exactly how — to boost the sluggish economy. Many analysts are expecting the Fed to take action, but they're also beginning to question whether another stimulus program will have any effect.

Read more
Africa
8:12 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Attack In Libya Threatens To Upset U.S. Ties

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 5:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Africa
8:03 am
Wed September 12, 2012

U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, 52, Killed In Libya

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:36 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

United States ambassadors do not always have a close connection to the countries where they serve. Sometimes, the ambassadors are friends of an American president. Sometimes, they're career diplomats who have posted to many countries over the years.

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Africa
6:16 am
Wed September 12, 2012

U.S. Condemns Killing Of Ambassador, Staff In Libya

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. We come to you this morning with grim news. The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans have been killed when protesters stormed the U.S. consulate in Benghazi. The protests were sparked yesterday by an American-made video circulating on the Web that ridicules Islam and the prophet Muhammad.

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Africa
6:15 am
Wed September 12, 2012

U.S. Confirms Deaths Of U.S. Ambassador, Staff

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONSTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. All through the morning we've been getting more details about the attack against the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

In the city that was at the heart of the Libyan revolution, protesters killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. Here's Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

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Education
4:37 am
Wed September 12, 2012

As Chicago Teachers Strike, Unions At A Crossroad

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

On the face of it, the teacher's strike in Chicago is about money, job security and how teachers are evaluated. But it's also about the political pressure on teachers' unions to make concessions that not long ago would've been unheard of. Teachers' collective bargaining rights these days have taken a backseat to bare-bones budgets and to claims that unions are an obstacle to efforts aimed at improving the quality of schools. As NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports, all these elements have come together in Chicago.

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Around the Nation
4:02 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Alaska Fisherman Rescued From Plastic Bin

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
4:01 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Gettysburg's Electric Battle Map Up For Sale

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Presidential Race
3:18 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Romney Addresses National Guard

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Mitt Romney used the 9/11 anniversary to praise servicemembers and talk about his own views of national security. Democrats have been attacking the Republican nominee for president on foreign policy issues, so Romney went to the National Guard convention in Reno, Nevada, to defend himself. He flew all the way across the country and back in one day to deliver this speech. And NPR's Ari Shapiro listened in.

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NPR Story
3:13 am
Wed September 12, 2012

IRS Awards $104 Million To Whistle-Blower

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

After a scandal, somebody finally gets rich for doing the right thing. It's NPR's business news.

A former banker, Bradley Birkenfeld, has just been awarded $104 million by the IRS. That is believed to be the largest amount ever paid to an individual whistle-blower. Birkenfeld told the IRS how a Swiss bank was helping thousands of Americans evade taxes, and was then thrown in jail.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's Wendy Kaufman has more.

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NPR Story
3:13 am
Wed September 12, 2012

German Court Rules In Favor Of EU Bailout Fund

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's shaping up to be an important day for the European Union and the future of its currency. In the Netherlands, there is a parliamentary election that's expected to be a barometer of Dutch support for staying in the eurozone. Also this morning, a plan was unveiled to give the European Central Bank the power to supervise the big financial institutions in Europe. And, Germany's high court ruled that the European bailout fund is legal.

NPR's Jim Zarroli joins us now from Berlin to talk about this.

Good morning.

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NPR Story
3:13 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Arctic Ice At Lowest Level In Decades

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Here's some troubling news. Ice covering the Arctic Ocean has melted more dramatically this year than ever before. This year's loss of ice has exceeded the previous record by an area the size of Texas. NPR's Richard Harris reports.

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National Security
1:39 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Software, Not Just Bullets, Puts Military At Odds

Soldiers use DCGS-A software at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland.
U.S. Army

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Military commanders, government officials and members of Congress have long wrangled over which weapon systems are needed. Now, there's an argument over what computer software should be provided to soldiers in Afghanistan. It's a defense dispute for the digital age.

In recent years, the ability to analyze data has become almost as important to U.S. war-fighters as the guns they use.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
1:39 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Modern Woman

Five years after suing Newsweek, Lynn Povich became the magazine's first female senior editor. Povich writes that her then-colleague Oz Elliott (right) was one of the first to say, "God, weren't we awful?"
Bernard Gotfryd Courtesy of PublicAffairs Book

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 12:43 pm

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call "Word of Mouth."

This month, Brown shares reading recommendations related to the changing role of women, including a book about when the women of Newsweek sued their bosses, an article about a wife becoming the primary breadwinner and another about how a woman's Facebook photo reflects her sense of identity.

'Women In Revolt'

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Law
1:38 am
Wed September 12, 2012

U.S. Grows An Industrial Complex Along The Border

A Border Patrol agent offers water to two men caught after illegally entering the U.S. through the Arizona desert. Roughly 80,000 federal workers have jobs related to immigration enforcement.
Ted Robbins NPR

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

The United States' southern border bristles with technology and manpower designed to catch illegal immigrants and drug smugglers. Since 1986, the government has spent hundreds of billions of dollars on fences, aircraft, detention centers and agents.

But even as federal budgets shrink and illegal immigration ebbs, experts say that there's no end in sight for the growth of the border-industrial complex.

A Growing Investment On The Border

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Sweetness And Light
8:03 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

NFL's West Coast Teams Have An Edge: The Sandman

Quarterback Matt Stafford and the Detroit Lions will travel to San Francisco to play the 49ers Sunday night. Because their body clocks are set to the Eastern time zone, the Lions could be at a disadvantage.
Rick Osentoski AP

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Hi! Are you a gambler? Do you like to bet football? Then this is your lucky day, for if you'll just stay tuned, I'm gonna offer you a free money-back guarantee: how you, too, can pick an NFL winner. Just don't turn that dial, and listen to this important message.

Read more
The Record
8:45 am
Tue September 11, 2012

My American Dream Sounds Like The Jackson 5

The six brothers who would all get their turn in The Jackson 5.
Frank Barratt Courtesy of Getty Images

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U.S.
7:57 am
Tue September 11, 2012

In New York City, A Somber Remembrance Of Sept. 11

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF BAGPIPES)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Those are the sounds of Ground Zero in New York where a memorial service is underway this morning, marking the anniversary - the 11th anniversary - of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Moments of silence and commemorations have been held in New York, at the Pentagon and at a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania to honor the nearly 3,000 victims of the attack.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Business
3:25 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Millions Of New Jobs, But Many Don't Pay Well

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The economy added only about 100,000 private sector jobs last month - far fewer than had been expected.

And as NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, a close reading of the numbers reveals that many of those jobs are low wage.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: Some of the nation's job growth has been in places like this - a suburban mall near Seattle. While many shoppers aren't spending like they did before the economic crash, they are buying more than they did a couple of years ago.

Read more
Strange News
3:21 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Marathon Runner Shatters World Record, Or Not

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When a runner, originally from Sudan, ran the Sioux Falls Marathon and shattered the world record by 25 minutes, he was as shocked as everyone else. Maybe I'm lost. I don't know, Olok Nykew told a reporter at the finish. Turns out, he was correct. According to the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, he had arrived late to the race. He ran the wrong route - the half marathon. I'm not cheating. I was just confused, he said. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Strange News
3:19 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Man Reviews Neighbors' Late-Night Karaoke

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Presidential Race
3:18 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Romney Campaigns In 'Must-Win' Ohio

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The presidential candidates are toning it down, we're told, on this 9/11. They'll stop their negative ads, they have said. But, of course, the campaigning will continue all fall. And Mitt Romney spent yesterday in Ohio. Over the weekend, Vice President Biden was there, as well. The Midwestern state is becoming like a second home to candidates in this presidential election season.

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Business
3:18 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Coca-Cola Returns To Myanmar

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is: soda diplomacy. The long isolated Southeast Asian nation of Myanmar, also known as Burma, is now undergoing dramatic political reform and opening up to the outside world. The U.S. recently lifted sanctions and sent an ambassador there. And what comes next? Coca-Cola.

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Around the Nation
3:18 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Conn. Court Examines Alleged Death Penalty Bias

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's catch up now on a court case in Connecticut that involves a group of death row inmates. The trial centers on whether there has been race, gender and geographic bias in Connecticut's death penalty cases. Diane Orson of member station WNPR reports.

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Presidential Race
1:31 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Rhetoric Aside, Few Details Of Romney's Tax Plan

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney campaigns at PR Machine Works in Mansfield, Ohio, on Monday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 1:59 pm

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's proposal to overhaul the tax code continues to draw scrutiny.

Romney says it is possible to cut tax rates without driving the government deeper into the red, and that he can make up for the lost revenue by closing tax loopholes. But analysts have had a hard time testing Romney's claim because he hasn't offered many specifics.

When he was pressed by NBC's David Gregory this weekend to give an example of a loophole he would close, Romney didn't offer much detail.

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Science
1:31 am
Tue September 11, 2012

A Berry So Shiny, It's Irresistible (And Inedible)

The shiny blue berries of the tropical Pollia condensata plant rely on their looks, not nutritional content, to attract birds to spread their seeds.
Silvia Vignolini et al. via PNAS

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 7:57 am

That fake fruit in the wooden bowls that hotels love to decorate their lobbies with never looks quite right. No, apparently it takes nature to make a fake that looks even better than the real thing.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:31 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Atlanta Symphony Locked Out

The Atlanta Symphony performs at New York City's Carnegie Hall in 2011.
Jennifer Taylor

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:49 pm

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and its musicians are at an impasse. The players' contract expired at the end of last month. The symphony is facing a $20 million budget deficit, and it's seeking millions in concessions from the musicians. Both sides say they want to reach an agreement, but they've left the bargaining table, putting the orchestra's 68th season in jeopardy.

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