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  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 4:54am
    Police near London received a troubling call, and all the dispatcher could hear was heavy breathing. Cops found the caller running through a yard. It was a dog with a wireless phone in its mouth.
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 4:35am
    Si Jia got depressed after her only companion moved to another zoo. The staff at the Yunnan Safari Park in southwest China built her a swing and parallel bars. She may get a real friend soon.
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 4:14am
    Several Ukrainian tanks are on the move in some eastern cities, according to reports Wednesday morning. Some of the armored personnel carriers are flying Russian flags.
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 3:08am
    The National Hockey League playoffs start Wednesday night, and the National Basketball Association playoffs begin Saturday. We run down the post-season picture for both sports.
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 3:08am
    The Demographics Unit was trying to root out terrorist threats, but never produced a usable lead. Kelly McEvers talks to journalist Matt Apuzzo, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the unit.

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Monkey See
3:14 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Impersonating The President: From Will Rogers To Obama's 'Anger Translator'

Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele cooperate to impersonate President Obama in Comedy Central's Key and Peele.
Ian White Comedy Central

Political commentators will be working overtime in the countdown to the presidential election. So will political comedians, including the candidates' impersonators.

Impersonators have been part of the political landscape for so long, it's hard to imagine a time without them: Rich Little, Dana Carvey, Will Ferrell, Dan Aykroyd, Darrell Hammond, Tina Fey and other comedians have all famously done their turns as candidates. Remember "I can see Russia from my house"?

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Election 2012
3:14 am
Mon October 29, 2012

What Type Of Economy Will Next President Inherit?

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Obama debate on Oct. 22 at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 11:29 am

Later this week we'll get another snapshot of the U.S. job market: the last unemployment report before next week's presidential election.

Forecasters expect another sign of slow but steady job growth. Whoever is in the Oval Office next year will have to cope with a sluggish U.S. economy and confront some urgent policy decisions.

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Shots - Health News
2:17 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Pricey New Prostate Cancer Therapy Raises Questions About Safety, Cost

Radiation therapist Jean Etienne holds a range compensator, which shapes the depth to which the proton beam enters a patient's body to target a tumor.
Rebecca Davis NPR

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 8:42 am

Bill Sneddon had a feeling he was in trouble when his doctor called with his latest test results.

"I just had a premonition that something's not right," said Sneddon, 68, of Ocean Township, N.J.

And, sure enough, Sneddon's instincts were right. He had prostate cancer.

"Well, it's an eye-opener, you know. I didn't know if I had to buy a yard sale sign, you know," he said. "It's a shocking thing ... It always happens to someone else."

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Law
2:08 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Surveillance Act Criticized, But Can It Be Fought?

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 3:14 am

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday considers whether to allow a challenge to a federal law that provides for large-scale electronic surveillance of international phone calls and emails. The case is not a direct test of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Rather, it is a test of whether the law can even be challenged in court at all.

How FISA Came To Be

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It's All Politics
9:31 am
Fri October 26, 2012

Do Political Ads Actually Work?

Democrats and Republicans are on track to spend about $1 billion each on television advertising in the presidential race. Most of it is negative, and almost all of it is concentrated in nine battleground states.

If you live in Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia or Wisconsin, you cannot get away from the ad blitz being waged by both sides. For the folks who track political advertising at Kantar Media CMAG, these commercials tell a story.

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Strange News
4:51 am
Fri October 26, 2012

Shark Surprises Golfers In Southern California

Golfers are used to hazards like sand traps, though rarely an obstacle as interesting as a shark. This week, at a golf course in Southern California, a 2-pound leopard shark was spotted on the 12th tee. It had apparently been dropped by an ocean bird flying overhead.

Strange News
4:42 am
Fri October 26, 2012

Jail Inmates Sue For Access To Dental Floss

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a reminder that guns don't kill people, dental floss kills people. Jail inmates in Westchester County, New York have sued the county for $500 million because they want to be issued dental floss. The county is reluctant, saying prisoners elsewhere have used floss as a weapon. They've also used it to escape, weaving ropes out of braided floss or even using toothpaste-coated floss to cut very slowly through cell bars. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:30 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Superman's Alter Ego Quits 'The Daily Planet'

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Stop the presses. Clark Kent is quitting The Daily Planet. The mild-mannered reporter apparently decided to show a little steel after being scolded one time too many by Editor-in-Chief Perry White. Superman's alter ego goes out big. Before the entire staff, he rails against the newspaper's new emphasis on entertainment and scandals. After seven decades on the news desk, Clark is reportedly reinventing himself in new media. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:30 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Animal Law Student Aims To Fight Dog Discrimination

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 6:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All Tech Considered
4:01 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Google's Street View Goes Into The Wild

Before Steve Silverman helped Google build its new Trekker, he built cameras for NASA to photograph the surface of Mars. Silverman says the Trekker is built to survive in intense conditions. It will boot up at 10 below zero Celsius or at 110 Fahrenheit. It will even work after being fully submerged in water.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:23 pm

Google's Street View maps are headed into the backcountry. Earlier this week, two teams from Google strapped on sophisticated backpacks jammed with cameras, gyroscopes and other gadgets, and descended to the bottom of the Grand Canyon. But this is just the first step in the search giant's plan to digitally map and photograph the world's wild places.

Luc Vincent — who runs Google's Street View — met up with a small group of reporters on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon this week.

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Afghanistan
3:04 am
Wed October 24, 2012

U.S. Eager To Step Aside; Are Afghan Forces Ready?

Afghan soldiers stand at attention during a ceremony transferring authority from NATO-led troops to Afghan security forces in Afghanistan's Kunar province. The transfer of responsibility for security from NATO-led ISAF forces to Afghan troops is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2014.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 5:30 am

America's exit strategy in Afghanistan is to have Afghan forces take the lead in fighting for their country. But too often these days, the job still falls to U.S. troops.

A senior officer in Afghanistan tells NPR that Americans continue to coddle Afghan forces and that this must stop. Tough love is in, the officer says. He says the Afghan forces are far more capable than the U.S. estimates and have simply grown accustomed to the U.S. doing everything for them.

That pretty much sums up the situation in southern Afghanistan earlier this year.

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How We Watch What We Watch
3:03 am
Wed October 24, 2012

So Many Screens, And So Little Time To Watch

A visitor looks at a bank of TV screens at a consumer electronics show in Berlin. While TV and movies are available on many devices, consumers often struggle to find exactly what they want, television critic Eric Deggans says.
Adam Berry Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 5:30 am

While sitting on a couch and gazing at a 50-inch TV remains a popular pastime in America, smaller screens have also edged their way into our lives. Phones, tablets and video game devices crowd pockets and coffee tables, offering access to what used to be called "TV," at any time of the day.

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The Impact of War
3:03 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Vet Walks On New Legs, With A Little Help From Mom

Nick Staback, who lost both of his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan, talks with his mother, Maria Staback, in Scranton, Pa. Maria Staback took a leave of absence from her job to move in with her son while he was recuperating at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center outside Washington, D.C.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 12:58 pm

On furlough from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center this summer, 21-year-old Nick Staback lounges on his parents' back porch in Scranton, Pa., taking potshots at sparrows with a replica sniper rifle. The long plastic gun fires pellets that mostly just scare the birds away.

It's been a tough year for Staback since his last foot patrol in Afghanistan.

"We [were] just channeling down a beaten trail, of course, you just don't know what's on it," he says. "We had the mine sweepers out front and everything like that."

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Sweetness And Light
8:03 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Brooklyn Finally Nets A Team Of Its Own

C.J. Watson of the Brooklyn Nets dribbles upcourt in a preseason game against the Philadelphia 76ers. The New York City borough finally has a pro sports team to call its own, says Frank Deford.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 5:30 am

It's largely forgotten now — but there was a time when the mere mention of Brooklyn would produce a cascade of laughs. It was like saying "woman driver" — surefire guffaws. Everybody from Brooklyn was supposed to be a character.

Every platoon in every war movie had one wise guy from Brooklyn in it. Brooklyn natives spoke funny. They said, most famously, "youse guys." At a time when African-Americans, Asian-Americans and Hispanics barely existed — visibly — in movies or on radio or television, Brooklyn was the all-purpose stand-in for our great American ethnic diversity.

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Strange News
3:53 am
Tue October 23, 2012

A Captive Beluga Whale's Remarkably Human Song

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a tale of the singing whale. Scientists this week published a study of a captive beluga whale in San Diego. The whale began to sing, apparently after spending time close to people. It died several years ago, but left behind a recording that sounds like a person in the shower.

(SOUNDBITE OF WHALE SINGING)

INSKEEP: We do not know if during his lifetime the singing whale ever made it to a karaoke bar.

Strange News
3:53 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Bridge Designers Envision Giant Trampolines

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Asia
2:58 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Malala Isn't Alone: Another Pakistani Girl's Dream

Pakistani security personnel stand guard in front of a burnt-out school following an attack by the Pakistani Taliban in the northwestern district of Upper Dir in June 2011. The Taliban have destroyed many schools in northwestern Pakistan.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 6:18 pm

Stop someone in the street. Ask them about the case of Malala Yousafzai. They will likely know — after the worldwide publicity given to her story — that Malala is the Pakistani teenager who was shot for demanding the right of girls to go to school.

They will surely know, too, that the people who shot Malala in the head from close range were the Pakistani Taliban. They will probably view Malala as the heroine she clearly is. And the Taliban will be seen as the violent fanatics that they surely are.

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All Tech Considered
2:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Microsoft, An Empire Under Siege, Makes Its Next Moves

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer speaks at a Microsoft event in San Francisco in July. This week, Microsoft launches Windows 8, a radical redesign of its operating system, as well as a new set of tablet computers.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 4:49 pm

Microsoft, the company that defined the PC, is still enormously profitable — but not as profitable as it once was.

This week, Microsoft will try to regroup. It is rolling out the largest upgrade of its Windows software in more than a decade. All of this is meant to help the company break into the exploding market for mobile.

While the company still commands a formidable computing empire, it is now under attack.

Microsoft's CEO is Steve Ballmer, a big, bombastic, balding guy. These days he's riled up about Windows 8.

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Author Interviews
2:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Running Toward Redemption On 'Ransom Road'

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 3:53 am

Meet a man with a powerful addiction — to running. Caleb Daniloff says he believes the sport saved him from addictions that were far worse, and he's written a new book, called Running Ransom Road: Confronting the Past, One Marathon at a Time, about his experiences.

Daniloff has run some familiar marathons — New York and Boston — but he's also been to a place not famous for outdoor running: Moscow.

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Books News & Features
2:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong

Pew's study found that 60 percent of Americans under 30 used the library in the past year.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 3:53 am

In what may come as a pleasant surprise to people who fear the Facebook generation has given up on reading — or, at least, reading anything longer than 140 characters — a new report from the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project reveals the prominent role of books, libraries and technology in the lives of young readers, ages 16 to 29. Kathryn Zickuhr, the study's main author, joins NPR's David Greene to discuss the results.

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Sports
6:11 am
Mon October 22, 2012

World Cycling Body Upholds U.S. Ruling On Armstrong

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Lance Armstrong became a bicycle racing legend when he won every Tour de France from 1999 to 2005. But after what happened today, there will be no official record of all those victories. Cycling's international governing body announced it will not appeal sanctions by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

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Strange News
4:48 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Out-Of-This-World Nuptials For London Klingons

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Strange News
4:17 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Deceased Man's Treasured Maps Go To L.A. Library

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All Tech Considered
2:34 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Six New Video Games That Will Get You Hooked

Machinarium from Amanita Design is an adventure game centered a robot who has been sent to the scrap heap. Players solve puzzles to help the robot return to the city.
Amanita Design

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 12:03 pm

Video game makers are rolling out their new titles — with a wide range of creativity and style — just in time for the holiday shopping season. Jamin Warren, founder of Kill Screen magazine, shares his list of video games you should keep your eye on:

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Television
2:33 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Ratings Success? It's All In The (ABC) Family

Broadway veteran Sutton Foster stars in the ABC Family show Bunheads, which, while focusing on adults, is still popular with ABC Family's demographic.
Adam Larkey ABC Family

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 3:09 pm

In a sterile white boardroom in ABC Family's headquarters in Los Angeles, two young women are assiduously ignoring a spread of cookies in favor of two more important things: their laptops and a live broadcast of the show Pretty Little Liars playing on a large flat-screen TV.

Dalia Ganz, 28, is the show's social-media manager. She's patiently teaching one of the beautiful young actors on the show how to live-tweet this episode.

"Include #prettylittleliars in your answers," she instructs. That is a literal transcription of her words.

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The Salt
2:31 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Swapping Out Sugary Soda For Diet Drinks May Help Tip The Scale In Your Favor

Drinking diet soda and other low-calorie drinks may help you manage weight, but experts say plain old H2O is still the best way to go.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:42 am

Diet soda. We love it or hate it. But there's no doubt that consumption is on the rise. More Americans than ever are drinking diet colas, along with other zero- and low-calorie alternatives.

While diet drink consumption is up across the entire population — about 1 in 5 of us consume them — it's higher-income, middle-aged women who are most likely to be sipping diet drinks, according to a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey.

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How We Watch What We Watch
2:28 am
Mon October 22, 2012

For Sports Fans, A Plethora Of Platforms To Watch On

Phil Coke and Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers celebrate after beating the New York Yankees in the American League Championship Series. Through the power of modern technology, fans could experience the game even if they weren't in front of a television screen.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:11 am

While most American homes still have a television in the den, how we watch, and what we watch, is changing. Computers, tablets, smartphones, DVRs and video game consoles have redefined what television is.

Viewers have officially become a multiscreen culture. And that means the TV industry is changing, as well. Consider that 36 million Americans watch video on their phones, according to the Nielsen ratings company.

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Around the Nation
5:26 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Financially-Strapped Mass. Man Wins Lottery

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 11:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

World
5:20 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Air Canada Passengers Spot Missing Yacht

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 11:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Music
4:03 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Recordings Reissued On Solti's 100th Birthday

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 11:03 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF OPERA, "THE FLYING DUTCHMAN")

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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