Westminster College Community Marches and Celebrates Martin Luther King Junior Day

Jan 20, 2014

Marchers young and old prepare to walk in celebration of Martin Luther King Day. They walked south from Westminster College on 1300 East. They then headed into the business district of the area before meeting in the Gore School of Business Auditorium for jazz music and speeches.
Marchers young and old prepare to walk in celebration of Martin Luther King Day. They walked south from Westminster College on 1300 East. They then headed into the business district of the area before meeting in the Gore School of Business Auditorium for jazz music and speeches.
Credit Bob Nelson

A small crowd of about 150 Westminster College students, faculty, and families from the neighborhood celebrated the legacy of Martin Luther King Junior today Monday. They marched through central Sugarhouse.  Luciano Marzulli is the director of Diversity Student Affairs and Services at Westminster. He says the legacy of Dr. King should be celebrated because there’s still a lot of work to be done.

“You look at the work that King did and he was a champion for poor people, he was a champion for people of color and he was a champion for equity." says Marzulli. "I would hope that those all are values that as a society we could embrace,” he says.

Documentary film maker, author and Nelson Mandela expert, Danny Schechter was a surprise participant in the march. He’s here taking part in the Sundance Film Festival. He says he knew Martin Luther King and he could feel King’s spirit among the marchers.

Author and documentary film maker Danny Schechter walks with marchers for Martin Luther King Junior Day. He spoke to the group gathered later of the connection between Nelson Mandela and Dr. King and of his relationship with both men.
Author and documentary film maker Danny Schechter walks with marchers for Martin Luther King Junior Day. He spoke to the group gathered later of the connection between Nelson Mandela and Dr. King and of his relationship with both men.
Credit Bob Nelson

“You could see it in the streets today. When young people particularly, you know young kids carrying soccer balls were walking in honor of Dr. King and I think he would have been very proud of that,” Schechter says.

Schechter commended the Westminster community for recognizing the importance of standing up for their rights and principles.  On January 22nd, Westminster officials invite the community to participate in a service project at Central Park Community Center. Volunteers will help paint offices and move equipment at the center.