Utah Senator Advocates For New National Lands Lawyer | KUER 90.1

Utah Senator Advocates For New National Lands Lawyer

Mar 23, 2018

The U.S. Interior Department still doesn’t have a top lawyer, even though Interior Secretary Zinke put forward Ryan Nelson’s name last summer.

U.S Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, says it’s time for the Senate to confirm Nelson for the post.

“The Interior Department needs to have a solicitor,” said Lee, who said in a Senate floor speech that he pulled all-nighters in law school with Nelson at Brigham Young University. “Ryan Nelson is an exceptionally qualified nominee for that position. Let’s confirm Ryan Nelson today.”

Lee described how Nelson had served in all three branches of government, including a stint handling environment and natural resource cases at the Justice Department. He’s been employed for eight years by Frank VanderSloot, a big GOP political donor and the man Forbes magazine calls Idaho’s richest resident.

Lee also linked Nelson to the Trump administration’s efforts to heal the distrust many Westerners have toward the federal government.

“We can help restore that trust by confirming impartial, well-qualified nominees,” he said, “and Ryan Nelson is such a nominee.”

At least one senator is blocking a vote on Nelson.

John Leshy, Interior’s top lawyer in the Clinton administration, says practically every decision at Interior – on energy, water, national parks — involves political questions as, well as legal ones.

“The solicitor has input on almost everything the department does. It’s a pretty powerful office,” said Leshy.

“Given [Nelson's] background from what I know about it, he’s going to reflect the positions of the President and the secretary of the interior, which are extremely conservative” when it comes to public lands.

The Department of Interior manages hundreds of millions of acres — most of it in the West. They include national monuments, national parks, wildlife refuges and mining sites.

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, Yellowstone Public Radio in Montana, KUER in Salt Lake City and KRCC and KUNC in Colorado.