Terry Gildea

News Director

Terry Gildea comes to KUER from San Antonio where he spent four years as a reporter and host at Texas Public Radio. While at KSTX, he created, produced and hosted the station's first local talk show, The Source. He covered San Antonio's military community for the station and for NPR's Impact of War Project. Terry's features on wounded warriors, families on the home front and veterans navigating life after war have aired on Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and All Things Considered. His half-hour radio documentary exploring the burn unit at Brooke Army Medical Center was honored by the Houston Press Club and the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters. Prior to his position in San Antonio, Terry covered Congress for two years with Capitol News Connection and Public Radio International . He holds a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Washington and a master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. Terry enjoys spending time with his wife and two young sons, fixing bicycles and rooting for his hometown Seattle Mariners.

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Boy Scouts of America

Leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced Wednesday that the organization will continue its relationship with the Boy Scouts of America, despite a recent rule change that allows troops to register gay adult leaders.

Utah Republican delegates met on Saturday to elect new officers and hear from their elected representatives. But they also took on the difficult task of approving changes to the party constitution in order for candidates to appear on the 2016 ballot.

Terry Gildea/KUER

Former Overstock.com CEO Jonathon Johnson announced his candidacy for Governor at the Utah Republican Party organizing convention on Saturday.

Courtesy of the Navajo Nation

Navajo President Russell Begaye is concerned the plume of mine waste is contaminating the water his people depend on. Begaye says Navajo land sits on two thirds on the river banks affected by the spill and he says ranchers and farmers fear their livelihood is at stake.

Courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Faithful Mormons gathered at the Salt Lake Tabernacle on Temple Square today to say goodbye to Boyd K. Packer.  The President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the LDS Church died last week at the age of 90. 

Members of the legislative commission charged with recommending a new site for the state prison will take longer than expected to reach a decision.

Courtesy photo.

State representative Jon Cox announced Wednesday that he will resign from the Utah House and take a job on Governor Herbert’s senior staff.

Courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

UPDATED 7/5/2015

Boyd K. Packer, leader of the Mormon faith’s highest governing body, has died. Packer was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was next in line to become President of the Church.   Packer served in World War Two as a bomber pilot and was appointed a member of the Quorum of the Twelve in 1970.

Courtesy of Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City officials are adding several new electric vehicles to the city’s fleet and replacing some older ones that burn fossil fuels. 

Judy Fahys/KUER

Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker announced Thursday that Police Chief Chris Burbank resigned from the department in the afternoon. 

Courtesy of the Diocese of Salt Lake

This weekend, Utah Catholics will say goodbye to the Most Reverend John Wester who has led the Diocese of Salt Lake for more than eight years.  Wester was recently appointed Archbishop of Santa Fe and will begin his service there next week.   

Terry Gildea/KUER

Getting water from streams, lakes and reservoirs to homes and businesses is challenging for any city utility.  Pipe valves leak. Water mains can break. Aging infrastructure can allow gallons of treated water to escape the system before ever getting to where it needs to go.  As our series Utah’s Uncertain Water Future continues, we look at how Salt Lake City water managers are trying to maintain a sophisticated pipe system and stay ahead of leaks.

Flickr creative commons

When we turn on our faucets at home we expect water to come rushing out of them on demand. It’s easy not to think about where that water comes from or how it’s treated.  But with climate change and persistent droughts across the West, many city water managers have to find creative ways to supply growing populations with the water they need.  We continue our series, Utah’s Uncertain Water Future, with a look at the sophisticated system that brings clean drinking water to the residents of Salt Lake City.

Roman Catholic Bishop John Wester is leaving Salt Lake City to lead the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. 

Lawmakers in Utah Senate passed a bill Tuesday night that would allow execution by firing squad if lethal injection drugs are not available. It now heads to Governor Gary Herbert for his approval. 

Salt Lake City’s first and only female mayor died on Sunday.  Deedee Corradini’s legacy includes helping bring the Olympics to Utah in 2002 and advocating for women’s ski jumping in the games.  

Courtesy of John Dehlin

Officials with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have excommunicated Mormon critic and podcaster John Dehlin. Dehlin’s local Church leaders notified him of their decision in a letter.  

Brian Grimmett/KUER

Utah House lawmakers narrowly passed a bill on Tuesday that would fund software designed to help students build language arts skills. 

Terry Gildea/KUER

Utah Republican Congresswoman Mia Love opened a new district office in West Jordan on Friday. 

Salt Lake Tribune Pool Photo

Governor Gary Herbert delivered his State of the State address Wednesday  night from the Utah State Capitol. 

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke on the campus of the University of Utah on Wednesday.

Utahns around the state are reacting to a decision by the U-S Supreme Court on Friday to rule on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage.  

Courtesy of John Dehlin

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is moving to excommunicate a Mormon for using his podcast to challenge Church doctrines.  

Terry Gildea/KUER


The Utah Republican Party released a poll over the weekend that shows a majority of voters favor a legal challenge to SB54. That’s the bill approved by the legislature and signed into law last year that will modify the state’s system for nominating political candidates. 


Officials with the Park City Planning Commission are preparing to review a request from Vail Resorts to build a gondola that will link The Canyons and Park City Mountain Resort. 

Brian Grimmett/KUER

Utah Football Offensive Coordinator Dave Christensen is leaving the Utes to take a job at Texas A&M.

Andrea Smardon/KUER

In close and hard fought race, Republican Mia Love holds on to defeat Democrat Doug Owens and claim victory in Utah’s 4th congressional district.  

Mia Love trailed Doug Owens for much of the night Tuesday as election results came in. But later in the night Love took a slim lead and held on with margin growing slightly bigger.  Just after 11 p.m. she took the podium to address her supporters as the congresswoman-elect in Utah’s 4th district.

Salt Lake Tribune Photo Pool

Republican Mia Love hopes she can win the seat after being narrowly defeated by incumbent Jim Matheson in 2012.  With Matheson announcing his retirement last year, Democrat Doug Owens has stepped into this year’s race with the hopes he can overcome a very popular GOP candidate. 

When Mia Love talks about her narrow defeat in 2012, the one fact she remembers specifically is the number of votes she lost by.

“768. Who’s counting?” says Love.

Only 768 votes.  But Love looks back on the race where she came up short as a learning experience.

Salt Lake Tribune Photo Pool

A new poll released Monday by Brigham Young University shows Democrat Doug Owens with a slight lead of over Republican Mia Love in the fourth congressional district race.  

Salt Lake Tribune Photo Pool

Republican Mia Love and Democrat Doug Owens faced off in a live debate Tuesday night broadcast on radio and television throughout the state.  Both candidates are vying to replace retiring congressman Jim Matheson and represent the state’s fourth congressional district.  

Mia Love and Doug Owens quickly showcased their differences on several issues.  Education and how it should be funded was central in the discussion.  Owens said that federal support for school programs and student loans still plays a role in making education affordable.