Judy Fahys | KUER 90.1

Judy Fahys

Reporter

Judy Fahys is KUER's reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, a journalism collaborative that unites six stations across the Mountain West, including stations in Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Montana to better serve the people of the region. The project focuses its reporting on topic areas including issues of land and water, growth, politics, and Western culture and heritage.

Fahys has reported in Utah for two decades, covering politics, government and business before taking on environmental issues. She loves covering Utah, where petroleum-pipeline spills, the nation’s radioactive legacy and other types of pollution provide endless fodder for stories. Previously, she worked for the Salt Lake Tribune in Utah, and reported on the nation’s capital for States News Service and the Scripps League newspaper chain. She is a longtime member of the Society of Environmental Journalists and Investigative Reporters and Editors. She also spent an academic year as a research fellow in the Knight Science Journalism program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In her spare time, she enjoys being out in the environment, especially hiking, gardening and watercolor painting.

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"Colorado Calling" Screenshot/Elevation Outdoors

Black Diamond founder Peter Metcalf helped make Utah a hub for outdoor-recreation businesses and lured the industry’s big trade show to Salt Lake City. This year, the trade show’s relocated to Colorado where public-lands politics are more in line with the industry’s.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

Last year was the third hottest ever recorded in Utah, according to new data from the National Weather Service.

National Park Service

They felt like the Interior Department had snubbed their valuable work, so most members of the National Park System Advisory Board resigned last week.

Courtesy/Dinosaur National Monument

Dan Chure had just wrapped up a career at Dinosaur National Monument last summer. He’d worked there nearly 40 years.

wbeem/Flickr Creative Commons

A federal agency has pressed the “pause” button on the license for the Lake Powell Pipeline.

Screenshot/Youtube

What if the fighting over public lands in San Juan County stopped and people started talking about solutions to conserve the land? That was a proposition floated at a hearing of the U.S. House Federal Lands Subcommittee yesterday. 

eka77/iStockPhoto.com

Salt Lake County health officials issued a warning Sunday to people who visited a West Jordan 7-11 recently. They might have been exposed to Hepatitis A.

KUER File Photo

The Utah Division of Air Quality is interviewing for a new staff position —  a compliance officer based in the Uintah Basin.

Utah Senate

Matt Hillyard was someone you’ve probably never met — unless you spent time at the Utah State Senate. There, he was famous and beloved. 

Judy Fahys/KUER

The state’s making progress on its proposal for the Lake Powell Pipeline. But now it’s asking to pause its federal license long enough to get an answer to a crucial question.

Intellectual Reserve, Inc

LDS Church President Thomas S. Monson led a flock of millions but he inspired one by one, with personal stories. On Wednesday, people around Temple Square shared some of their favorites.

Ken Lund/Flickr Creative Commons

A federal lands agency wants to sell more than three dozen oil and gas leases, and environmental groups are protesting because some potential drilling sites lie just outside protected areas.

Rex Turgano/Flickr Creative Commons

Beginning this month Salt Lake City will stop accepting plastic bags for recycling. There are several reasons for the city’s “Bag-the-bag” campaign.

Nicole Nixon / Julia Ritchey / KUER

From politics to public lands, 2017 was another big year of local news. KUER reporters recap some of the top stories of the year and why they mattered. 

Howard Berkes, Kelsie Moore, Julia Ritchey / NPR / KUER

A year ago today, President Barack Obama created the Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah. The story's taken twists and turns all year. A few weeks ago, President Trump lopped off more than a million acres from the monument. Now there's a flurry of legal challenges. KUER shares some of the voices that have defined the ongoing monument fight. 

Courtesy/Mark Maryboy

San Juan County is asking a federal court to finalize a recent decision on voting districts. County leaders want to appeal the ruling, as the county’s Native American majority applauds it.

Josh Ewing/Friends of Cedar Mesa

A new education center is taking shape to protect the rich cultural resources around the Bears Ears in southeastern Utah.

Courtesy/City of Provo

Now that the holidays are over, many Utahns will be trying to figure out what to do with their Christmas trees.

Judy Fahys/KUER

Opposition seems to be growing against plans for raising entrance fees at some national parks, and some critics in Utah want the National Park Service to reconsider.

Marc Toso / Courtesy: Patagonia

The very public fight between the outdoor gear company, Patagonia, and public lands policymakers continued this week, when the company's founder rejected an offer to testify on Capitol Hill.

National Park Service

Americans love their national parks.

But what do they think about paying more to play in them?

Judy Fahys/KUER

Let’s start with President Donald Trump.

“Uranium is a big subject,” he said in the Oval Office a couple of months ago. “If the mainstream media would cover the uranium scandal, and that Russia has 20 percent of our uranium…”

Screenshot from House Federal Lands Subcommitee.

Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, presented his bill Thursday to reconfigure what used to be the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.

Kevin Gill / Flickr Creative Commons

Utah fire agencies are helping fight the devastating wildfires in southern California.

Utah Department of Transportation

It's a great time to try out public transit. That's because the first big inversion of the season has settled in and pollution's building in northern Utah valleys.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

Environmental groups and Native American tribes wasted no time in filing lawsuits to stop the Trump administration's vast cuts to two Utah national monuments. 

Judy Fahys/KUER

President Donald Trump’s orders to scale down two national monuments in southern Utah was widely anticipated by residents there.

Julia Ritchey / KUER

Update 12:35 PM MST — Pres. Donald Trump has signed two presidential proclamations, one to modify Bears Ears and another for Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments.

Source: U.S. Interior Department

Everything about the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is big. It’s 1.9 million acres. It’s filled with dinosaur bones and ancient history.

Judy Fahys / KUER News

President Donald Trump is expected to cut the size of two national monuments when he comes to Salt Lake City on Monday.

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