Colin Dwyer | KUER 90.1

Colin Dwyer

Updated at 4:13 a.m. ET Sunday

President Trump's travel ban remains suspended, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied a Justice Department request to stay the suspension of President Trump's order.

The court asked opponents of the ban to respond to the Trump administration's appeal by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. PT; the court asked the Justice Department to respond by Monday at 3 p.m. PT.

Here's an abridged list of phrases you might not expect to be spoken in anguish by a chess play-by-play announcer:

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

The U.S. added 227,000 jobs in January and the unemployment rate rose just slightly, ticking up a tenth of a percentage point to 4.8 percent, according to the monthly report released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The robust jobs number beat most predictions from economists, who had pegged the payroll increase at 175,000, according to NPR's Yuki Noguchi.

Aggrieved at what they perceive as acquiescence to President Trump's agenda, liberal demonstrators have begun taking a page out of a doctor's playbook: They are making house calls.

Last month, the British Supreme Court dealt Prime Minister Theresa May a small setback in the U.K.'s relentless march toward Brexit, ruling that she would need to seek Parliament's approval before triggering a formal divorce from the European Union.

On Wednesday, Parliament set that march back on course.

As concerns over player safety mount, the national governing body for youth and high school football is considering a version of the game that could look radically different from what football fans might expect.

It's a leaner, less contact-inclined game, focused on fostering well-rounded athletes and cutting down on the kinds of bone-rattling, open-field hits that can leave parents cringing in the bleachers.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

They began Saturday as a series of pop-up demonstrations outside several major airports. But by Sunday, the protests against President Trump's temporary immigration freeze had leapt from those airports to squares and plazas in cities across the U.S.

Outside the White House, in Boston's Copley Square and Battery Park in New York City, immigrant advocacy groups have organized protests to register their discontent with the executive order Trump signed Friday.

Updated at 1:38 p.m. ET

A raid in Yemen ended in the death of an American service member and left three others wounded on Saturday. U.S. Central Command announced Sunday that the casualties were sustained in an operation against al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of one of our elite servicemembers," Commander of U.S. Central Command Gen. Joseph Votel said in a statement. "The sacrifices are very profound in our fight against terrorists who threaten innocent peoples across the globe."

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

It has been a day thick with phone calls for President Trump. By the end of the day, the president will have spoken over the phone with the leaders of five countries, including Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET Sunday

Federal Judge Ann Donnelly in Brooklyn, N.Y. granted a request by the American Civil Liberties Union and issued a stay late Saturday on the deportations of valid visa holders after they have landed at a U.S. airport. The ruling by Donnelly temporarily blocks President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration signed Friday.

According to NPR's Hansi Lo Wang:

When we asked listeners to write advertisements for the small joys in life, the stuff and experiences money can't buy, we weren't surprised to find a few things come up often in the sales pitches. Sunsets, breezes, stars and granddaughters — we're with you on those, dear listeners.

Funny enough, though, something else kept coming up: math. There were ads for arithmetic, graph theory, the unending wonders of pi ... what was going on here?

King George III isn't exactly a hero of history.

In most U.S. textbooks, he is portrayed as the British tyrant who lost the Colonies in the American Revolution. He's scarcely more popular in his native U.K., where his bouts with mental illness late in life earned him the impolite epithet "Mad King." And lately, on stage in Hamilton, George's alleged villainy is played for laughs.

But starting Saturday, the much-maligned monarch may get a second chance.

Once more, the National Mall has swelled with demonstrators.

Just a week after President Trump's inauguration at the Capitol and six days after the Women's March on Washington, abortion-rights opponents were raising their voices in the nation's capital. The annual rally they call the March for Life attracted demonstrators from across the country Friday.

It's no secret that NPR has a soft spot for haiku. Springtime, social media, the Super Bowl, even, um, grindcore?

It seems readily apparent that the writer of a book titled Bad Feminist would register significant disagreement — to put it politely — with a writer who has called feminism "bowel cancer."

Rio was good to Usain Bolt.

The record-setting sprinter left the 2016 Summer Games with more than just three Olympic golds in hand; he also had a place etched into history as the first athlete to complete a "triple-triple" — or victories in all three major sprint events in three consecutive Olympics.

It turns out Beijing, however, has not been so kind.

President Trump spoke with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu over the phone Sunday, in what was one of Trump's first conversations with a foreign leader since taking office.

The discussion was "very nice," Trump said after a ceremony to swear in senior White House staff. The White House later put out a statement saying the president invited Netanyahu to visit in February.

Updated 4:30 a.m. ET Monday:

In southern Georgia, near the border with Florida, severe weather turned deadly in the early hours of Sunday morning. At least 18 people were killed as the area was racked with storms, according to local officials.

Gov. Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency for seven counties in the state.

A passenger train leapt the tracks overnight in southeast India, killing at least 39 people and injuring more than 60. The derailment, which occurred near Kuneru station in the state of Andhra Pradesh, is the latest in a string of deadly wrecks to rack the Indian railway system.

The derailment threw several coaches of the Hirakhand Express train off its own tracks and onto an adjacent goods train.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

A British police watchdog is investigating an incident last Saturday in Bristol in which an officer fired a stun gun at a black man who has served as a community-relations adviser for local law enforcement.

At least four people were killed and 20 more injured when a man deliberately drove his car into a crowd of pedestrians at a mall in Melbourne, Australia, according to officials. In a statement released Friday, Victoria state police said a young child was among the dead.

"The incident is not terrorism related," the department added.

It took about two weeks, nearly 7,500 miles, nine countries and two continents. But before this freight train could roll to a well-deserved stop, it had to break through one final barrier, a banner proclaiming its historic achievement:

"First freight train from China to UK — Yiwu to London."

The hunt for a man suspected of killing a pregnant woman and an Orlando police officer has ended more than a month after it began. Markeith Loyd was arrested Tuesday, placed in the very handcuffs once owned by Master Sgt. Debra Clayton, the officer he allegedly killed.

"I believe our entire community is going to breathe a sigh of relief at this point," Orange County Sheriff Jerry Demings said at a news conference Tuesday night. "This maniac, if you will, is off the streets of our community."

Just days from the end of her tenure, Loretta Lynch took the stage Sunday at a historic Baptist church in Birmingham, Ala., to deliver her final planned speech as U.S. attorney general.

"We can't take progress for granted," Lynch told the congregation. "We have to work. There's no doubt that we still have a way to go — a long way to go."

Bitterness between Balkan neighbors flashed to the surface this weekend after a train was turned back from the Kosovo border. The train, which had been painted with Serbian national colors and the phrase "Kosovo is Serbia," cut short its journey amid fears it was under threat of violence.

Iraqi forces have made a crucial step in the bloody quest to retake Mosul from the Islamic State, according to a spokesman for the country's military. Iraqi Brig. Gen. Yahya Rasool announced that the city's university has been fully retaken from ISIS militants.

Special forces, known in Iraq as the Counter-Terrorism Service, or CTS, raised the Iraqi flag above the campus Friday, the Associated Press reports — but the troops were still days away from claiming complete control.

Updated at 3:32 p.m. ET

Foreign ministers and other diplomats from some 70 different countries descended on Paris on Sunday, with the intent to renew peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians. The summit, which was held without leaders from either side of the conflict, pushed for the establishment of a Palestinian state.

"We are here to reiterate strongly that the two-state solution is the only one possible," said French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault, in his opening remarks to top envoys at the conference.

Just one day after Jennifer Holliday told the media she planned to sing at a welcome concert for President-elect Donald Trump, the Tony Award-winning singer says she has reconsidered. Holliday will not be performing at the inauguration-related event.

She announced the turnabout in a letter provided to The Wrap. She wrote, in part:

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