Camila Domonoske | KUER 90.1

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Representatives from 196 nations made a historic pact Saturday, agreeing to adopt green energy sources, cut down on climate change emissions and limit the rise of global temperatures — while also cooperating to cope with the impact of unavoidable climate change.

The deal still needs to be adopted by individual governments — but the acceptance by the diplomats gathered in Paris has been hailed as "transformative."

Russian President Vladimir Putin said Friday that his forces are helping factions of the Free Syrian Army, a statement that could signal a shift in Russia's policy in Syria.

In a speech to his top military commanders, Putin said the Russian military has provided weapons, supplies and air support to the Western-backed opposition group.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports that during the speech:

"Putin said Russia has received targeting information from the Free Syrian Army, and used it to hit what he called 'terrorist' positions.

With a historic, planetwide pact on the line, hundreds of diplomats in Paris are preparing to extend the U.N. climate change conference into Saturday.

The deadline to reach consensus on a climate deal was supposed to be midnight Friday. But conference leader Laurent Fabius, the French foreign minister, said there wouldn't be a finished text — let alone full approval — until Saturday morning.

Wal-Mart is launching a new mobile pay system, allowing customers to use their smartphones to pay for purchases with credit, debit, prepaid or gift cards.

The service will be available in select stores this month, and across the country next year, the retail giant says.

Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal was the result of a "chain of errors," Chairman Hans Dieter Pötsch said Thursday, admitting that the fault extends to the company as a whole, rather than a handful of rogue engineers.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has apologized for the death of Laquan McDonald, the black 17-year-old shot 16 times by a Chicago police officer in 2014.

"That happened on my watch," Emanuel said in an emotional address to a special meeting of the Chicago City Council on Wednesday, NPR's David Schaper reports.

"I'm sorry," the mayor said, promising "complete and total reform of the system."

In 2014, the Wu-Tang Clan turned a double album into lost treasure.

Once Upon A Time In Shaolin was heard, in its 31-track entirety, only by Wu-Tang Clan leader RZA and producer Cilvaringz.

They vowed to sell just a single copy — with a seven-digit price tag. They destroyed all duplicates and placed the only extant version in a hand-carved silver and nickel box, along with a 174-page leather-bound book of lyrics, anecdotes and credits.

Texas and the federal government have taken their power struggle over Syrian refugees to federal court.

In a suit filed Wednesday, the state says it wasn't adequately consulted over refugee placement and asked the court system to immediately block the resettlement of any Syrian refugees in Texas.

The federal government responded Friday, saying it had communicated with the state as required and that Texas' request would prolong the suffering of families with small children for no legitimate reason.

Speaking one day after at least 14 people died in a mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., President Obama said the investigation into the attack is now in the hands of the FBI — and warned that it may take some time to find answers.

Obama began his remarks from the Oval Office by noting that at this stage in the investigation, the two shooters' motivations are not known.

After a mass shooting, a police chase and a shootout, a violent day in San Bernardino, Calif., ended in the death of two suspects, authorities say.

Syed Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, were responsible for the Wednesday morning attack that killed at least 14 people and injured 21, according to San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan. After initial concerns that there could have been a third shooter, police are now confident there were only two.

Cameroon's military says it has killed more than 100 members of Boko Haram and freed more than 900 people who had been held hostage by the militant Islamists.

The news, which is difficult to independently verify, came in a statement from Cameroon's defense minister, Joseph Beti Assomo.

"The statement says during the sweep last week, from Nov. 26 to 28, Cameroonian troops also ... recovered a large stock of weaponry and black and white Islamic State flags," NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton tells our Newscast unit. "Few details were forthcoming about those reportedly freed."

In January 1945, in a German POW camp, a U.S. soldier named Roddie Edmonds defied the threat of death to protect the Jewish troops under his command.

Seventy years later, he's being recognized for his valor.

It's the first time a U.S. soldier has been named Righteous Among the Nations, an honor from Israel's Holocaust remembrance and research center reserved for non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.

Top Russian military officials have accused Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of personally profiting from illegal oil trade with Islamist militants in Syria.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow that at a news conference, Russian military officials offered what they called evidence of oil smuggled to Turkey from ISIS-controlled fields in Syria. "They presented aerial photographs and satellite images that they say show long lines of tanker trucks carrying the oil to depots and refineries in Turkey," Corey says.

The British Parliament has begun a daylong debate over whether to grant the government authority to conduct airstrikes against ISIS in Syria.

The U.K. is already conducting strikes against ISIS in Iraq.

NATO has invited the Balkan nation of Montenegro to join the military alliance, over Russian objections and threats of retaliation.

The invitation by member states was announced Wednesday at a meeting of NATO foreign ministers.

The last nations to join the NATO alliance were Balkan states Albania and Croatia, in 2009. And Russia's concerns center on which countries might be next, Reuters reports. The news service adds:

The two civilians killed in a shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic Friday were Ke'Arre Stewart, a father of two and Army veteran who served in Iraq, and Jennifer Markovsky, a mother of two who was reportedly at the clinic to support a friend.

After meeting with his national security team, President Obama made a public statement that there is no specific, credible threat against the U.S. at this time, urging Americans to go about their Thanksgiving activities as usual.

Obama acknowledged that the deadly attacks in Paris on Nov. 13 struck a deep chord with many Americans.

"Given the shocking images, I know Americans have been asking each other whether it's safe here — whether it's safe to fly or gather," the president said, a fear he called understandable.

A Pentagon investigation into a deadly U.S. airstrike on a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, has found the attack was the result of human error, compounded by malfunctioning computers and communication failures.

Gen. John Campbell, the commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, detailed the findings in a Pentagon briefing Wednesday. "This was a tragic but avoidable accident caused primarily by human error," he said.

Four days after security levels were raised over a possible terrorist attack, the Belgian capital remains on high alert — but schools, businesses and subway stations are reopening to the public.

Police and soldiers were standing guard as life in Brussels returns to something like normal, reports NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton:

One of two crew members survived the shooting down of a Russian warplane by Turkey on Tuesday, Russian officials say, and was rescued by a Syrian commando unit in an operation that ended early Wednesday.

One year after President Obama announced new executive actions on immigration, his administration is asking the Supreme Court to weigh in on the new policies.

The executive actions in question — the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents, or DAPA, as well as an expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA — would have affected millions of immigrants.

Four civilian meteorologists who died during a U-boat attack in World War II posthumously received Purple Heart medals on Thursday.

Lester S. Fodor, George F. Kubach, Edward Weber and Luther H. Brady volunteered to serve on a Coast Guard ship in 1942. Kubach and Weber were 24; Fodor and Brady were 27.

The ship went on weather patrol in the North Atlantic, as NPR's Joe Palca reports for our Newscast division:

The House of Representatives has easily passed a GOP-authored bill to restrict the admission of Iraqi and Syrian refugees to America by requiring extra security procedures.

The bill — called the American Security Against Foreign Enemies Act of 2015, or the American SAFE Act of 2015 — would require the secretary of Homeland Security, the head of the FBI and the director of national intelligence to sign off on every individual refugee from Iraq and Syria, affirming he or she is not a threat.

Most deaths ever recorded, biggest increase ever observed, more countries affected than ever before: A new report on global terrorism in 2014 found a number of grim benchmarks were met last year.

The report finds that deaths from terrorist attacks increased by 80 percent, compared to 2013, and that Boko Haram was the deadliest terrorist group in the world last year.

More than 32,000 people were killed by terrorism in 2014, according to The Global Terrorism Index — compared to 18,111 the year before.

On Friday, coordinated terrorist attacks struck the French capital, killing more than 120 people.

Deadly attacks hit multiple sites simultaneously. There were explosions outside a massive stadium. Scores of people were held hostage inside a concert venue. Diners at several cafes and restaurants faced volleys of gunfire.

The incident has prompted anger, grief and an outpouring of sympathy from around the world.

Coordinated terror attacks in Paris on Friday took the lives of more than 120 people and left hundreds wounded. The self-proclaimed Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the killings, and French president Francois Hollande has called the attack "an act of war."

In the wake of the attack, Paris was locked down, and France declared a state of emergency.

The Kansas City Royals have earned their first World Series title in 30 years, staging a dramatic Game 5 comeback to beat the New York Mets 7-2.

They took home the series four games to one.

The final game featured a stunning extra-innings turnaround. It started as a pitchers' duel: the Mets' Matt Harvey against Kansas City's Edinson Volquez.

Beating the Mets 5-3, the Kansas City Royals came from behind in the eighth inning, placing themselves one win closer to a World Series title. A Royals rally and a fatal error by second baseman Daniel Murphy leaves Kansas City one game away from their first championship title in 30 years.

You probably won't be one of the few souls to meet Pope Francis on his visit to the U.S. next week. But hey, it could happen, and if it does, don't you want to be ready?

Here's a primer on what you need to know so, at the very least, you'll be well-prepared for small talk about him, if not to him.

Etiquette

The pope is never introduced. He literally is a man who needs no introduction. (You, of course, ought to be introduced by somebody.)

Flavia Pennetta has defeated Roberta Vinci to win the U.S. Open, in a women's final that was an all-Italian affair.

The two women have more in common than their nationality. They were opponents and doubles partners as kids, the Associated Press reports. It was the first major final for both. And they were both outperforming expectations just by being there: Vinci was unseeded, and Pennetta was the 26th seed.

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