Brian Grimmett

Online Editor

Brian Grimmett is a former intern who worked his way onto the KUER staff. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University with a bachelor's degree in communications. As a student he helped produce and report for the University's daily news show, ElevenNEWS, and also served a year as the station's sports director. Brian developed a love for public radio when he interned at KUER, choosing to do so because it was the only broadcast related internship in Salt Lake City that offered compensation, and now says he couldn't imagine working anywhere else. Brian is originally from Arlington, Texas. When he isn't at KUER Brian enjoys spending time with his wife and two little kids, taking pictures, and putting together short films and documentaries. 

You can follow Brian on twitter @briangrimmett

Ways To Connect

A deal made more than 30 years ago between the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Salt Lake County could end up saving taxpayers millions of dollars.

The Gateway Mall looks to get out of the shadow of City Creek, a couple of Utah airports will feel the effect of federal spending cuts, and Bishop John C. Wester of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake sits down with KUER’s Dan Bammes.

Our recent series with RadioWest on Clearing the Air gets a thumbs up from this City Weekly story. Let us know what you thought about it.

Prominent Utah pollster Dan Jones retires, members of the Clearfield Community Church try and move on after a devastating fire, and the University of Utah plans to bring science to prisons.

The Salt Lake City Council can’t decide on a final destination for the Sugarhouse Streetcar, Salt Lake City and County reach an agreement for a new performing arts center, and thousands of gallons of diesel fuel spill into Willard Bay Park.

A gay rights organization takes on Utah’s Amendment 3, Salt Lake County expands their small business loan program, and Saratoga Springs Mayor Mia Love could be gearing up for a rematch with Congressman Jim Matheson.

Monday March 19, 2013

Legislative Wrap-up

Rep. Becky Lockhart, R-Provo (Speaker of the House)

Sen. Jerry Stevenson, R-Layton

Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck, D-Salt Lake

Sen. Gene Davis, D-Salt Lake (Senate Minority Leader)

Lindsay Zizumbo, Moderator

Utah’s Zion Curtain is staying put, three air quality bills survive, and the education budget gets a shot in the arm.

Brian Grimmett / KUER

Join KUER's team of reporters for a live chat from the Utah State Capitol as we track down the most important stories on the last day of the Utah State Legislature. Join in on the conversation and tell us what you think about this year's legislative session. Let us know what you think, be it  the good, the bad, or the ugly.

Brian Grimmett

HB 76, the bill eliminating the need to get a concealed carry permit, is moving to the governor’s desk after the Senate gave it final approval today.

Sen. Allen Christensen, R-Ogden, is the Senate sponsor of the bill. He says he simply wants to make it easier for Utahns to exercise their 2nd Amendment rights that they already have.

“It doesn’t change anything about who can carry a weapon or possess a firearm," he says. "It simply gives honest people the right to do what they can’t do honestly right now, and that is cover up the weapon.”

Brian Grimmett

A bill that would remove the need to get a concealed carry permit for gun owners over the age of 21 is one vote away from being sent to the Governor’s desk. HB76 received preliminary approval in the Utah Senate today. 

Brian Grimmett

Republican Senator Stephen Urquhart’s LGBT antidiscrimination bill did not receive a vote on the Senate floor Monday, effectively killing it for this year’s legislative session.

By passing out of committee SB262, which would prohibit employers and landlords statewide from discriminating against homosexuals, made it further than any other similar legislation ever has. Democratic Senator Jim Dabakis co-sponsored the bill and while he says that he’s disappointed that it didn’t receive a vote in the Senate, he acknowledges that they’re moving in the right direction.

A statewide anti-discrimination bill gets preliminary approval, Alliance for a Better Utah files a complaint about Attorney General John Swallow, and the Republican caucus releases their preliminary budget proposal.

Utah students and families battle the rising cost of higher education, a bill to fund preschool programs for at-risk children fails in the Utah Senate, and Representative Jim Matheson introduces legislation to end straight ticket voting.

Brian Grimmett / KUER

A controversial bill that would help create preschool programs for at-risk children failed in the Utah Senate today.

Bob Nelson

A bill that would require schools to notify the parents of children who are being bullied or who have threatened suicide has passed out of the Utah Senate today. Sen. Luz Robles, D-Salt Lake says SB184 is aimed at helping parents share responsibility with the schools and allow them to be more engaged in what happens with their children.

Thursday, February 28

U.S. Portugal Relations

His Excellency Nuno Brito
Ambassador to the U.S. for Portugal

Thursday, February 28

Who Will Be Our Privacy Champion: Congress, the FTC or Class Action Lawyers?

Kasmir Hill

Senior Online Editor at Forbes and author of The Not-So-Private-Parts blog.

Brian Grimmett

Governor Gary Herbert along with legislators and government leaders are putting their support behind a bill that would help local and state agencies expand their fleets of Compressed Natural Gas vehicles.

The Utah House looks at tax credits for clean fuel vehicles, Governor Herbert is against a bill eliminating the need for a concealed carry permit, and legislators join a coalition of groups from the private sector to promote workplace safety.

The Utah Legislature looks at a bill that would delay the start date for Utah’s guest worker program, the so-called “Zion Curtain” may be coming down, and KUER’s Dan Bammes takes a look at how Utah’s Industries are contributing to air pollution.

Brian Grimmett

A couple of alcohol related bills managed to make their way through House committees Wednesday including one that would eliminate Utah’s so-called “Zion Curtain.”

HB228 eliminates provisions in Utah law that requires restaurants to keep open liquor bottles and the actual mixing of drinks out of public sight. Republican Rep. Gage Froerer voted in favor of the bill. He says the current law is an unnecessary obstacle.

Brian Grimmett

The Utah House of Representatives considered three gun bills Tuesday afternoon and managed a vote on only one of them.

Of the three gun-related bills that the Utah House had a chance to debate, only Republican Rep. Dixon Pitcher’s HB121 received a vote. It would allow an individual to turn over a gun in his or her household to the police for up to 60 days if they feel it presents a danger to themselves or others in the house. Rep. Pitcher says he believes this law will help save lives without causing too much inconvenience.

www.senatesite.com

Utah’s latest revenue projections released today at the state legislature are slightly lower than previously expected.

Utahns on both side of the argument weigh in on gay marriage, the Utah legislature prepares to hear this year’s revenue projections, and the mayor of a small Utah town resigns.

Utah Governor Gary Herbert addresses Medicaid expansion, guns, and the sequester at his monthly news conference, the Legislature debates a suicide prevention bill, and former Governor Jon Huntsman says he supports gay marriage.

Brian Grimmett

Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and a number of other regional and state leaders joined together to announce several new projects and events that will make riding a bike throughout the county easier and safer. Becker says they’ve received more positive feedback from their bike initiatives over the past few years than anything else and that this year it will only get better.

Stephen Z CC

As the Utah Legislature considers several bills aimed at changing gun laws we decided to take a look at what the laws in Utah actually say right now and, as equally important, what they don’t.

Who Can Own a Gun?

In part two of our series on clearing the air KUER’s Terry Gildea takes a look at what state lawmakers are doing, the legislature gets its first look at several gun bills, and Senator Orrin Hatch brings gloom and doom to the House and Senate Floor.

Governor Gary Herbert weighs in on a potential statewide anti-discrimination bill, the Utah Senate gives preliminary approval to a bill that would require the state to collect abortion statistics, and oil and gas drilling are the cause of most of the air pollution in the Uintah basin.

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