Brian Grimmett

Online Editor

Brian Grimmett is a former intern who worked his way onto the KUER staff. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University with a bachelor's degree in communications. As a student he helped produce and report for the University's daily news show, ElevenNEWS, and also served a year as the station's sports director. Brian developed a love for public radio when he interned at KUER, choosing to do so because it was the only broadcast related internship in Salt Lake City that offered compensation, and now says he couldn't imagine working anywhere else. Brian is originally from Arlington, Texas. When he isn't at KUER Brian enjoys spending time with his wife and two little kids, taking pictures, and putting together short films and documentaries. 

You can follow Brian on twitter @briangrimmett

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Kennecott Utah Copper

The early estimates of the size of the Bingham Canyon mine slide show that more than 165 million tons of rock and dirt have slid into the bottom of the mine. That makes this slide the largest to ever happen there. Kennecott Utah Copper spokesperson, Kyle Bennett, says it will have a large impact on their yearly copper production.

"The 165 million ton slide does translate, unfortunately, into a reduced production of refined and mined copper of about 50 percent,” he says.

The Salt Lake City Police department re-evaluates security plans for the Salt Lake City Marathon, the Utah Legislature likely won’t reconvene to overturn the veto of HB76, and the Salt Lake County District attorney drops more drug cases involving the West Valley City Police Department.

Brian Grimmett

In the aftermath of the explosions at the Boston Marathon today the Salt Lake City Police Department is clarifying their security plans for this weekend’s Salt Lake City Marathon.

The Salt Lake City Police Department says the Salt Lake City Marathon will proceed as planed this Saturday. Salt Lake City Police Chief Chris Burbank says they don’t anticipate a need to increase the security presence that has already been planned either.

Work resumes at the Bingham Canyon copper mine, UTA opens its airport TRAX line, and the Utah legislature has only a few days left to overturn Governor Herbert’s veto of HB 76.

Kennecott Utah Copper

Ground movement at the Bingham Canyon Mine resulted in a landslide last night. The slide occurred around 9:30 p.m. on the North side of the mine near where the visitor’s center was previously located. Kennecott Utah Copper spokesman Kyle Bennett says all employees at the mine are safe and accounted for. All work at the mine has also been suspended until geotechnical experts get a better assessment of the situation.

UTA debuts its new TRAX line to the airport, Chevron begins cleanup in Willard Bay, and a U of U researcher is getting an up close and never before seen view snowflakes.

A University of Utah researcher is taking pictures of snowflakes in a way that’s never been done before and the results could help forecasters better predict the weather.

If you’ve ever seen a picture of a snowflake it probably looked a lot like the paper cut-outs made every winter by thousands of first and second graders across the country: unique, but perfectly symmetrical and flat. But according to Tim Garrett, an atmospheric science professor at the U who helped develop a new way to photograph snowflakes, that image is a lie.

The Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce calls out Utah’s Senators for their inaction on immigration reform, Utah’s Attorney General sends a letter to Congress encouraging immigration reform, and the Ogden-Hinckley Airport control tower will stay open, for now.

Salt Lake City launches a new bike sharing program, outdoor businesses call on the president to protect land around Utah’s national parks, and a wind storm brings gusts up to 50 miles an hour to the Wasatch front.

File

Republican Congressman Jason Chaffetz called for a piecemeal approach to immigration reform while speaking at the Hinckley Institute of Politics today. He says if you want to solve the overall problem you have to start by fixing legal immigration.

“You never ever solve this problem unless you fix legal immigration," he says. "I don’t care how big, far, wide your fence is, if you don’t fix legal immigration you never solve the problem.”

Friday April 5, 2013

U.S. - Thailand Relations

His Excellency Chaiyong Satjipanon, Ambassador to the U.S. for the Kingdom of Thailand

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints holds its annual general conference, a group of LDS women seek the priesthood, and the Utah State Office of Education questions what type of student data should be public.

Brian Grimmett

Local leaders celebrated the completion today of the Provo Reservoir Canal Enclosure, one of the most significant water projects in Utah. The celebration comes after nearly two decades of planning, negotiating and hard work from several of the Wasatch Front’s major water districts and local governments. But the project isn’t without some loose ends.

Intermountain Health Care is fined more than $25 million dollars, Governor Herbert won’t be signing a water agreement with Nevada, and the USDA targets poverty in Southeast Utah.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is expanding a program into Utah that is aimed at helping rural counties escape the grasp of persistent poverty.

The new StrikeForce Initiative brings together agencies within the USDA in an attempt to better coordinate efforts to spur economic development in rural counties. Dave Conine is the Rural Development state director. He says by making knowledge and resources available through things like micro-loans that they’ll be able to make a real difference.

Salt Lake City updates the fee and scheduling process for athletic fields, Sanpete County Sheriffs capture the elusive “Mountain Man”, and an explosion at a Tooele County titanium plant injures two.

The Utah Pride Center won’t be getting a scout troop, Utah’s courts open up the door to electronics, and UTA puts into effect fare increases.

Brian Grimmett

Utah courtrooms are becoming a little more open and transparent today. Members of the public are now allowed to bring cell phones, laptops, tablets, and other electronic devices into Utah courtrooms. 

Federal spending cuts affect Utah’s poor and hungry, Utah’s GOP Chairman says he won’t run for re-election, and Utah’s courts begin a new era of openness.

Governor Herbert says he’s close to a decision about the Snake Valley water agreement, the Utah Foundation addresses the conflict between education and transportation, and the Department of Corrections gets a new executive director.

The Utah Tourism Office launches a new ad campaign, Utah gets its first non-profit health insurance cooperative, and state agencies begin creating air quality improvement plans.

Utah Senator Mike Lee says he’ll actively block any new gun control legislation, the Utah Supreme Court hears arguments in a controversial adoption case, and Salt Lake City wrestles with increasing fees to use the city’s athletic fields.

Brian Grimmett

The Utah Office of Tourism launched a brand new regional ad campaign today to help promote the state’s five national parks.

The $3.1 million dollar campaign will include TV commercials in major western markets like Los Angeles, Denver, and San Francisco as well outdoor and digital advertisements. Governor Gary Herbert was on hand for the launch. He says tourism has and will continue to help Utah’s economy.

The U.S. Interior Department announces a plan to develop Utah tar sands, a sweetheart deal could end up saving Salt Lake County millions of dollars, and the University of Utah begins an investigation into their swim team.

A deal made more than 30 years ago between the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Salt Lake County could end up saving taxpayers millions of dollars.

The Gateway Mall looks to get out of the shadow of City Creek, a couple of Utah airports will feel the effect of federal spending cuts, and Bishop John C. Wester of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake sits down with KUER’s Dan Bammes.

Our recent series with RadioWest on Clearing the Air gets a thumbs up from this City Weekly story. Let us know what you thought about it.

Prominent Utah pollster Dan Jones retires, members of the Clearfield Community Church try and move on after a devastating fire, and the University of Utah plans to bring science to prisons.

The Salt Lake City Council can’t decide on a final destination for the Sugarhouse Streetcar, Salt Lake City and County reach an agreement for a new performing arts center, and thousands of gallons of diesel fuel spill into Willard Bay Park.

A gay rights organization takes on Utah’s Amendment 3, Salt Lake County expands their small business loan program, and Saratoga Springs Mayor Mia Love could be gearing up for a rematch with Congressman Jim Matheson.

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