NPR News

Pages

Economy
5:24 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Shaping The Economic Future: 4 Big Ideas

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 10:02 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Over the last month, WEEKEND EDITION has been talking to top economists about jobs, growth, debt and taxes. But we also ask them a broader question: What is the one big idea in economics that's really caught your attention lately?

NOURIEL ROUBINI: Ideally, I would like the economists to become boring again.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:12 am
Sun September 9, 2012

The Tech Buyer's Dilemma: Timing The Plunge

Amazon Kindle vice president Peter Larsen holds the Kindle Fire HD at the introduction of the new tablet in Santa Monica, Calif., on Thursday.
Reed Saxon AP

If you're one of those people who covet the latest, greatest thing (assuming you can afford it), life's been pretty tough for you lately. The announcements of new handheld electronic gadgets — and rumors of those to come (Apple fans are standing by) — have come so rapidly that it's been hard to keep up with them all.

Read more
Education
3:48 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Chicago Teachers May Strike, Teach Political Lesson

Members of community group Parents 4 Teachers display pro-teacher posters outside City Hall Friday in Chicago. The Chicago Teachers Union has threatened to strike Monday if negotiations fail.
Sitthixay Ditthavong AP

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Twenty-five thousand Chicago teachers are planning to walk off the job Monday if they don't have a contract by midnight Sunday. As the Democrats look to unions to help them get out the vote, a strike by Chicago teachers might just put a crimp in those plans.

On Friday during rush hour, a handful of parents and students stood on a bridge over the Eisenhower Expressway, holding signs that read, "Honk if you support teachers." Among them is Rhoda Gutierrez, who has two children in a Chicago public elementary school.

Read more
Fine Art
3:47 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Are All Young Artists 'Post-9/11' Artists?

Knitting Is for Pus**** is a work by crochet sculptor Olek. He has created an entire apartment blanketed in brightly colored, crocheted camouflage.
Olek Courtesy Jonathan LeVine Gallery, New York, N.Y.

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 1:52 am

When museum curator Nicholas Bell was putting together the show Craft Futures: 40 Under 40 at the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick Gallery, he realized the artists had something in common besides their under-40 status. Because of their youth, he felt that each of them could be classified as "post 9/11" artists.

"Their worldview is defined by the angst, the unease, the trepidation of the difficulties of the 21st century," he says.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:46 am
Sun September 9, 2012

VFW Posts Become Refuge For Women, Too

From left, Linda Ausen, Marvin Jansma, Diane Sandberg and David Griffith volunteer during bingo night in July at the VFW post in Rosemount, Minn.
Jennifer Simonson MPR

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

For decades, Veterans of Foreign Wars posts have played vital roles in small towns throughout America. But in recent years, as World War II veterans have passed away, membership in VFWs has fallen drastically, and many posts have closed. Now, though, some are facing a possible renaissance, thanks to female soldiers returning from overseas.

The main room of the VFW post in Rosemount, Minn., is half-bar and half-bingo hall, with long card tables. In a corner, two men on a stage rotate a round cage of balls and call out bingo numbers.

Read more
House & Senate Races
3:45 am
Sun September 9, 2012

GOP Has Rare Shot At Winning House Seat In Mass.

Richard Tisei is running for U.S. House in Massachusetts, where he could be the first Republican in that seat in 15 years.
Josh Reynolds AP

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

U.S. House candidate Richard Tisei is openly gay. He's also openly Republican.

"You know what, in Massachusetts, it's a lot easier to be gay than be a Republican," he says, "as far as trying to get elected to office."

But Tisei could make political history for the Massachusetts GOP. Not just because they could win their first U.S. House seat in 15 years, but also because Tisei would be the first openly gay Republican to be elected to a term in Congress.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:44 am
Sun September 9, 2012

'Good Girls Revolt': Story Of A Newsroom Uprising

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 6:42 am

In the 1960s, Lynn Povich worked at Newsweek — where she became part of a revolution.

"At Newsweek, women were hired on the mail desk to deliver mail, then to clip newspapers, and, if they were lucky, became researchers or fact checkers," Povich tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer, whom she knows personally. "All of the writers and reporters were men, and everyone accepted it as that was the way the world was — until we didn't."

Read more
Africa
3:39 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Yet Again, Congo Faces The Specter Of Civil War

The eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo has been ravaged by rebel groups for years. A new faction, the March 23 Movement, or M23, already controls a large area, and there are fears this could ignite another war. Here M23 fighters go out on a patrol.
Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

For years, armed militias have been stalking the lush forests in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, committing all sorts of atrocities against villagers. And now one of the most war-ravaged countries in the world has another looming problem: an emerging rebel group.

"A notorious group of human rights violators" is how the U.N. human rights commissioner describes the group, known as the March 23 Movement, or M23.

Read more
Europe
3:39 am
Sun September 9, 2012

Istanbul, A City Of Spies In Fact And Fiction

Though not the capital, Istanbul is the cultural, economic and financial heart of Turkey. Situated on the Bosporus strait, this metropolis spans Europe and Asia — and has a storied history as a gathering place for spies.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

Headlines today in Turkey feature stories of alleged Iranian spies, gathering information about Kurdish militants who are responsible for many deaths in Turkey this summer.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun September 9, 2012

The Raveonettes: The Sound Of Surfing In The Rain

The Raveonettes is the Danish-born duo of Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo. The band's new album is titled Observator.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 11:43 am

For more than a decade, The Raveonettes' members have been making albums filled with fuzz-guitar feedback and tight girl-group harmonies. The duo's latest album, Observator, takes on a different sound, thanks in part to its embrace of a new instrument.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

Drawing A Blank (Or Two)

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 11:50 am

On-air challenge: You are given sentences with two blanks. Put a word starting with R in the first blank. Then move that R to the end to make a new word that goes in the second blank to complete the sentence. For example, given the sentence, "The door of the Indian ___ was left slightly ___," the answers would be "raja" and "ajar."

Read more
Politics
6:55 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

Social Issues Hold Sway Over Ohio's Black Voters

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

In 2008, then-Senator Barack Obama won nearly all the African-American vote. And this year, a recent poll found that less than 1 percent of black voters will back Mitt Romney. But in Ohio, as NPR's Allison Keyes found out, some black voters are agonizing over whether to vote in November at all.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more
The Two-Way
3:37 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

Bomb Explodes Near NATO Headquarters In Kabul

Afghan police carry the remains of a suicide attack victim in the Kabul's diplomatic quarters, home to many Western embassies, on Saturday.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

A suicide bomber has blown himself up near NATO headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan. There are conflicting reports, but The Associated Press cites the police, saying at least six people were killed. The International Security Assistance Force, the NATO-led coalition in Afghanistan, says on Twitter that there have been no reports of ISAF casualties.

Read more
The Salt
3:12 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

America's Best Chefs Answer The Call To Serve Their Nation

America's state chefs might be called on to prepare state dinners, travel abroad or host culinary experts from around the world.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 2:10 pm

The State Department is deploying a new, elite force onto the precarious stage of international diplomacy. More than 80 top chefs from across the nation were inducted into the first-ever American Chef Corps on Friday.

How will these culinary soldiers serve their country? The Associated Press says:

Read more
Sports
3:04 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

At 42, Detroit Lions Kicker Earns Admiration

Detroit Lions place-kicker Jason Hanson attempts a field goal in a preseason game against the Oakland Raiders. Hanson, 42, has played 21 consecutive seasons for the Lions.
Thearon W. Henderson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 6:55 pm

As the NFL's regular season gets under way this weekend, one player is adding another year to an already record-setting career. At 42, Detroit Lions place kicker Jason Hanson is the oldest active player in the NFL.

And despite playing a notoriously tenuous position, Hanson has also been with one team longer than anyone in the history of the league — no small feat in an industry where players often switch teams in search of a bigger paycheck or where a missed kick can cost you your career.

A High-Pressure Position

Read more
Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:04 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

The Movie Jon Favreau Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Robert De Niro leaning against a wall in a scene from Martin Scorsese's Mean Streets.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 6:55 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor-writer-director Jon Favreau, whose credits include Swingers, Rocky Marciano, The Replacements and Iron Man, the movie he could watch a million times is Martin Scorsese's Mean Streets.


INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

On when he first saw the film

Read more
NPR Story
2:44 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

Is The 'Better Off' Question The Right One?

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 6:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Hello, St. Pete.

RAZ: President Obama campaigning today in St. Petersburg, Florida, two days after accepting his party's nomination for president...

OBAMA: I am fired up.

RAZ: ...where his new stump speech emphasizes job creation.

OBAMA: We can keep giving more tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas just like the other side is arguing for.

(SOUNDBITE OF BOOING)

Read more
NPR Story
2:44 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

Week In News: The Post-Convention Push

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 6:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

MITT ROMNEY: In the last four years, we've seen that promise fade away. Hispanics are hurting.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: But Mitt Romney would break that promise, replace your benefits with a voucher.

RAZ: Some of the latest political ads coming out of the Romney and Obama campaigns. James Fallows of The Atlantic joins me now, as he does most Saturdays, for a look behind the headlines. Jim, welcome.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Guy.

Read more
Music Interviews
10:51 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Dave Matthews On His Band's 'Unique Sort Of Love Affair'

"I can remember saying 'I can't imagine that I'm going to be doing this when I'm 45' — and I'm 45," Dave Matthews says.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 6:55 pm

For many people, the definitive soundtrack of the mid-1990s was a band out of Virginia with unusual instrumentation and an unmistakable sound. Born and partially raised in South Africa, Dave Matthews was a bartender in the college town of Charlottesville when he founded the Dave Matthews Band in 1991. Two decades on, the group has sold 40 million records and become one of the biggest live acts in the world.

Read more
Fresh Air Weekend
10:03 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Fresh Air Weekend: Feathers, Cellphones As Trackers

Thor Hanson's own cast of Archaeopteryx lithographica presents what he calls the "ancient wing written in stone."
Thor Hanson Basic Books

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Read more
It's All Politics
8:36 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Words Wealthy Democratic Donors Should Get Used To: 'It's Me, Rahm'

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants you ... if you're a wealthy Democrat who can write a $10 million or $20 million check.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 12:11 pm

Now that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is in charge of raising really big dollars for a superPAC that supports President Obama, wealthy Democrats all over the country may be eyeing their phones nervously.

Emanuel, the former Obama White House chief of staff, is known for not taking no for an answer and for aggressively going after what he wants.

Indeed, he's a ferocious fundraiser who gets to the point, often throwing in an epithet or two for emphasis, just the sort of rainmaker needed by Priorities USA Action, the pro-Obama superPAC that desperately needs cash.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:06 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Looking To 'Future,' Ga. Schools Require Mandarin

Instructor Huiling Li encourages second-grader Trinity Faulkner on the first day of Mandarin Chinese classes at Brookdale Elementary School in Macon, Ga.
Adam Ragusea for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 9:57 am

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

Read more
Latin America
4:03 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Plan For Cuban Ballet School A Dance Of Art, Politics

Cuban ballet dancer Carlos Acosta has a bold plan to transform a long-abandoned, incompletely built ballet school in Havana into a global cultural and dance center. But some fear the plan is a step toward "privatization."
Nick Miroff for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 7:39 pm

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

Read more
Politics
3:59 am
Sat September 8, 2012

As Election Nears, Keeping Donors A Secret Is Trickier

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 3:32 pm

Read more
Around the Nation
3:58 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Forget The Heels: What It Takes To Be Miss Navajo

Miss Navajo contestants must work in teams to butcher sheep. From left, Wallitta Begay, Leandra "Abby" Thomas and Charlene Goodluck had to cut the sheep's throat, remove the stomach and quarter the carcass.
Laurel Morales for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 10:41 am

The Miss Navajo contest is not your typical beauty pageant. Instead of swimsuits and high heels, you get turquoise and moccasins. One of the talent competitions is butchering sheep, and speaking Navajo is a must.

Read more
Three-Minute Fiction
10:04 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Round 9: Pick A President

Best-selling author Brad Meltzer is our judge for Round 9 of Three-Minute Fiction. His books include The Inner Circle, The Book of Fate and The Millionaires. His latest book, The Fifth Assassin, is due out in January.
Eric Ogden

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 1:49 pm

This election season, Three-Minute Fiction is getting political. Weekends on All Things Considered has a new judge, a new challenge and a new prize for Round 9. For this contest, submit original, short fiction that can be read in about three minutes, which means no more than 600 words.

The judge for this round is writer Brad Meltzer. He's the author of seven novels, including the best-seller The Inner Circle. His newest thriller, The Fifth Assassin, will be out in January.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:39 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Opening Panel Round

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 9:24 am

Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Obamabrau.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:39 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell.

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: We're playing this week with Paula Poundstone, Tom Bodett, and Jessi Klein. And, here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill Kurtis.

(APPLAUSE)

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:39 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell.

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: We're playing this week with Jessi Klein, Tom Bodett, and Paula Poundstone. And, here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:39 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Limericks

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924. Or you can click the contact us link on our website waitwait.npr.org.

There you can find out about attending our weekly live shows here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago and our upcoming show at the Fox Theater in Atlanta, Georgia on September 20th. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

KATHLEEN PENDLETON: Hi.

Read more

Pages