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Participation Nation
3:03 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

High Fiving In Truckee, Calif.

Roy Tuscany on the slopes.
Courtesy of HFF

In 2006, Roy Tuscany was an up-and-coming professional skier, solely focused on his burgeoning career. Then a fall during training left Roy paralyzed from the waist down.

As a young athlete, Roy had to depend on the community to help him through his recovery — to walk and even ski again. It was that connection with generous people that led Roy to start the High Fives Foundation, dedicated to helping injured athletes get back on their boards, skis and wheels.

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Race
2:12 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

Advantage Tennis: Improving Game's Racial Disparity

Serena Williams, left, and Venus Williams compete in Wimbledon at the 2012 Summer Olympics.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 3:04 pm

Venus and Serena Williams, Sloane Stephens and Donald Young will be among those vying for Grand Slam Glory at the U.S. Open Tennis Championships, which start Monday at Flushing Meadows in New York.

Those four are the only African-Americans who rank among the top 100 men's and women's players in the country at this stage. Some tennis enthusiasts say the game has got to do better than that – and they are working at the grassroots to level the playing ground.

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Author Interviews
12:44 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

'A Contest Of Wits': A Former Forger Recalls His Art

After John F. Herring by Ken Perenyi, circa 1989.
Courtesy of Pegasus Books

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:11 am

Next time you're admiring a 19th century American master painting at a museum or auction house, take a closer look. What looks like an authentic creation complete with cracks and yellowing varnish could actually be the work of forger Ken Perenyi.

Perenyi made millions of dollars over 30 years with more than 1,000 forgeries, allowing him to jet set around the world. His highest earning work was a Martin Johnson Heade forgery that sold for more than $700,000.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
12:37 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

The Movie Regina King Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Patrick Renna as Hamilton 'Ham' Porter in 1993 sports film, The Sandlot.
John Bramley The Kobal Collection / 20th Century Fox

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 3:04 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actress Regina King, whose credits include Jerry Maguire and Ray, and who currently stars on the TNT TV show Southland, the movie she could watch a million times is The Sandlot.


INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

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The Picture Show
12:35 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

Documenting Haiti's Ruined Grandeur

A view of the collapsed cupola of the National Palace is seen in Port-au-Prince on Aug. 13. The palace, which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake that killed an estimated 200,000 people, was supposed to be demolished, but the plans have been put on hold.
Swoan Parker Courtesy of Reuters

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 3:04 pm

Photojournalist Swoan Parker recently toured Haiti's National Palace, which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake. NPR's Laura Sullivan interviewed Parker about her photos of the once-grand building.

Laura Sullivan: It looks like the building is literally falling down on top of you — how dangerous was it to walk around this former palace?

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Politics
12:30 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

GOP Hopes House Hopeful Will 'Change Impressions'

Saratoga Springs Mayor Mia Love, who is running for a House seat, speaks at the Republican state convention April 21, in Sandy, Utah. Love would be the first black, female Republican elected to Congress.
Leah Hogsten The Salt Lake Tribune via AP

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 5:42 pm

A Utah congressional hopeful will take the stage Tuesday at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla.

Mia Love is the mayor of Saratoga Springs, a small Utah community, but her energy and personal story have Republicans believing she's a winner. If elected, she'd become the first black female Republican in Congress.

Perhaps Love's unofficial audition for a speaking slot in Tampa started when she took the stage at the Utah state GOP convention in April.

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Music Interviews
11:19 am
Sun August 26, 2012

The Avett Brothers: Matters Of Life And Death

The Avett Brothers are real-life siblings Scott (left) and Seth Avett (right), and bass player Bob Crawford. The band's newest album is The Carpenter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 4:15 pm

In 2009, The Avett Brothers became one of the surprise hits of the year. Paste Magazine considered their I and Love and You the best album of that year, calling it "an overpowering acoustic album brimming with sadness and soul."

That sadness took on new meaning recently. Bassist Bob Crawford took a temporary leave from the band to tend to his infant daughter, Hallie, after she developed a brain tumor.

Next month, The Avett Brothers release a new album, The Carpenter, which explores the delicate balance between life and death.

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Participation Nation
11:03 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Happier Bottoms In Kansas City, Mo.

Kerry Rodriguez and her three sons organized a diaper drive for HappyBottoms at their church.
Courtesy of HappyBottoms

Babies need diapers. But it's not always easy for low-income families who might have to choose between buying diapers or paying bills. Federal assistance programs do not pay for diapers, so if parents can't afford them, babies sit in soiled diapers. That's unhealthy, and it leads to fussier babies — which stresses out parents even more.

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It's All Politics
5:32 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Romney's Auto Bailout Stance Complicates Campaign In Battleground Ohio

Cars at the General Motors Assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, in 2009.
Mark Stahl AP

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 2:00 pm

The auto industry is big business in Ohio. Billions of dollars' worth of cars and auto parts are made in the state each year. Thousands of unionized auto workers live in Ohio, as do the business owners and employees who make it one of the top auto parts suppliers in the nation.

So, the auto bailout is a hot issue — and a complicated one.

For Republicans in Ohio, the bailout is a tough issue — perhaps because of Mitt Romney's initial stance, or perhaps because of the consensus that the bailout worked.

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Middle East
5:15 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Syria Plunges Into Another Week Of Deep Violence

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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World
5:15 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Hong Kong Keeping Syria Online

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Politics
5:15 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Convention Veteran Checks GOP Mood In Tampa

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Among the Republicans heading for Tampa this week - weather permitting, of course - is Chuck Grassley, the senior senator from Iowa. He's held that office since 1981. We spoke with him Friday, before event organizers delayed the kickoff for the Republican National Convention, and asked him how he thinks Republicans are feeling about the election.

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Music
5:15 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Music Al Fresco: Milwaukee's Saxaphone Summer

Scott Summers has been playing saxophone for close to 30 years, and performing outside for 10.
Lucien Jung

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 4:55 pm

"My favorite location is Miller Park, bar none," Scott Summers says. "Go Brewers!"

Summers is a saxophone player based in Milwaukee. He's been blowing the horn for 30 years — and about 10 years ago, he started playing on the street. Summers says performing outside the ballpark has brought him loyal followers.

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Politics
5:15 am
Sun August 26, 2012

What To Expect At The GOP Convention

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We're joined now by Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR. Hi, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: We just heard Senator Grassley, the Republican from Iowa, say he reluctantly attend his party's political convention because he has a sense of obligation, which raises the question: what is the point of these conventions anyway? Do you think people still pay attention to them?

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Politics
4:54 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Tropical Storm Forces GOP Convention Delay

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Participation Nation
4:25 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Clean And Green In Fort Wayne, Ind.

Stephen J. Bailey is cleaning up his city.
Courtesy of Fort Wayne's Downtown Improvement District.

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 8:13 am

My friend Stephen J. Bailey is a strong voice for the revitalization of downtown Fort Wayne. He oversees social media and web development for the Downtown Improvement District. He enjoys running and whenever he runs through downtown or the West Central area, he takes a bag with him so he can pick up trash as he goes.

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Animals
4:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

A Pachyderm's Ditty Prompts An Elephantine Debate

Shanthi explores her yard at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C., in 2010. The 36-year-old Asian elephant loves blowing into a harmonica.
Mehgan Murphy Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:06 pm

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Snakes, And The Snake Wranglers Who Love Them

Matt and Paula Wilson (in background) clear rattlesnakes from a field in Pennsylvania. They work as snake wranglers, clearing areas for natural gas company employees.
Scott Detrow WITF

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

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Africa
4:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Ugandan Gold Medalist Returns To Fame And Fortune

Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich wins the gold medal in the men's marathon at the 2012 London Olympics. As the impoverished country's second gold medalist in 40 years, Kiprotich became an instant national hero.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 4:02 pm

On the last day of the London Olympics, a Ugandan runner seemingly came from nowhere during the marathon to pass the favored Kenyan and Ethiopian athletes and win gold.

Stephen Kiprotich is the first gold medalist from Uganda since John Akii-Bua won the 400-meter hurdles at the 1972 Munich Olympics. In the last two weeks, Kiprotich has become an unlikely national hero in a struggling country that rarely has much to cheer about.

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Restoration Done, Iconic Reflecting Pool Reopens

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Reflecting Pool on Washington, D.C.'s National Mall began as a glorious mirror for the Washington Monument, stretching out from the foot of the Lincoln Memorial stairs. Visitors could see the reflection, the obelisk itself, and over its shoulder the huge dome of the Capitol, the site everyone who comes to Washington wants to see. But over the years, the pool grew increasingly dank and slimy looking, leaking, smelly. Finally, the Park Service closed it for a complete do-over. Two years later, it's almost ready.

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NPR Story
4:13 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Looking At The Economy On The Campaign Trail

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Once the Republican convention gets underway, we can expect to hear a lot of talk about jobs and the economy. That is the ground where Mr. Romney wants this fight to happen. Just this past week, the Congressional Budget Office said the country would see a significant recession if Congress fails to resolve differences over a series of automatic tax increases and budget cuts, scheduled to happen in January. With so much at stake, just how constructive is the level of economic discourse in this presidential campaign?

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NPR Story
4:13 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Baseball Has Week In Doping Spotlight Too

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

NPR's Mike Pesca joins Weekend Edition Sunday guest host Linda Wertheimer to talk about two high-profile steroid suspensions in baseball.

NPR Story
4:13 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Composer Keith Kenniff Keeps The Ads Humming

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Keith Kenniff writes music for advertising.

KEITH KENNIFF: It was funny. When I first started doing this I, thought of commercials like jingles. Like the Roto Rooter, you know, jingle or something like that.

(SOUNDBITE OF A ROTO ROOTER AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Singing) Call Roto Rooter, that's the name.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) And away goes trouble down the drain.

WERTHEIMER: But Kenniff's music is different

(SOUNDBITE OF AN IPHONE AD)

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Presidential Race
3:27 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Despite Delay, Republican Stage Is Set In Tampa

Workers prepare for the Republican National Convention inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla., on Saturday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

After a year and a half of preparations, Tampa, Fla., is ready host the Republican National Convention.

Some 70,000 delegates, support personnel, media and protestors are gathering for the party's nominating event. Originally scheduled to start on Monday, the convention was pushed back because of Tropical Storm Isaac.

Inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum — a hockey arena that's been transformed into a high-tech political stage — it's a vision in red, white and blue. There's a nod to tradition, placards marking the sections reserved for each state's delegation.

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Remembrances
3:21 am
Sun August 26, 2012

In Just 'One Small Step' Armstrong Became An Icon

Armstrong stepped into history July 20, 1969, leaving the first human footprint on the surface of the moon.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

It was the kind of history that ignites the imagination of humanity.

On July 20, 1969, hundreds of millions of people around the world watched or listened as the lunar module Eagle carried astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the surface of the moon. Armstrong got on the radio to let them know "the Eagle has landed."

Almost seven hours later, Armstrong stepped off the ladder in his bulky white space suitand said those famous words: "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind"

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Middle East
3:21 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Palestinians Flood Into Israel, If Only Briefly

A mother and son wait to enter Israel through the Qalandia checkpoint, which separates the West Bank and Jerusalem. Most of the year, Israel permits relatively few Palestinians to visit, but over the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, 1.2 million Palestinians were allowed in.
Daniel Estrin for NPR

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 9:27 am

As Palestinian Muslims in the West Bank celebrated the end of Ramadan this past week, many traveled to a place that's usually off limits: Israel.

At the main Israeli checkpoint between the West Bank and Jerusalem, you could hear the taxi drivers offering to take Palestinians to the beach in Tel Aviv.

The drive is no more than an hour from the West Bank boundary to Israel's Mediterranean coast. Yet many Palestinians have not taken a dip in years, if ever.

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Megafires: The New Normal In The Southwest
3:20 am
Sun August 26, 2012

'Torture Lab' Kills Trees To Learn How To Save Them

Powers walks along plastic gutters designed to keep rain away from tree roots to simulate drought. Scientists here are studying the effects of sustained drought conditions on the tree species of the Southwest.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 4:03 pm

Last of a five-part series

The droughts that have parched big regions of the country are killing forests.

In the arid Southwest, the body count is especially high. Besides trying to keep wildfires from burning up these desiccated forests, there's not much anyone can do. In fact, scientists are only now figuring out how drought affects trees.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:12 pm
Sat August 25, 2012

Making Peace With Our Cyborg Nature

Lance Armstrong competes in the Ironman Panama 70.3. triathlon in Panama City, Panama.
Arnulfo Franco AP

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:51 am

I loved the TV show The Six-Million Dollar man growing up. For me, Steve Austin (played by Lee Majors) wasn't less cool because he had bionic implants that enabled him to perform superhuman feats. He was more cool.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:03 pm
Sat August 25, 2012

What Hat Holds The Answer?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which one of the words starts with W and the other word is the same with the W removed. For example, if you were given the clue "desires scurrying insects," the answer would be "wants ants."

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Presidential Race
6:16 pm
Sat August 25, 2012

RNC Shuts Down Monday's Events Due To Storm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

The Republican National Convention, in Tampa, has canceled almost all events for Monday night, citing Tropical Storm Isaac. Convention organizers made that announcement, saying safety is their primary concern. NPR's Jeff Brady is in Tampa, and he joins us now. Jeff, tell us what's happening.

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