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Chun Zheng has lived through a house fire, a flood and an earthquake. None of that, she says, compares to sending her infant daughter and son abroad to live with her extended family.

"It's the worst hardship I've ever had to bear," says the 42-year-old hotel housekeeper, speaking in Mandarin.

When foreign leaders loot their homelands, they sometimes like to stash their valuables in the U.S. Yachts, mansions and artwork have all been purchased in America with laundered money, according the the U.S. Justice Department.

It happens often enough that the department has set up a special unit dedicated to tracking down international kleptocrats.

Updated 11:15 p.m. ET with official reporting hits on radar sites

A U.S. official says the Navy has destroyed three radar locations in Yemen after missiles were fired at a U.S. destroyer off the Yemeni coast.

The official says:

"Earlier this evening (9 p.m. EDT / 4 a.m. local time in Yemen), the destroyer USS Nitze launched Tomahawk cruise missiles targeting three coastal radar sites in in Yemen along the Red Sea coast, north of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait. Initial assessments indicate that all three targets were destroyed.

German officials say a Syrian man arrested on Monday for allegedly planning a bomb attack has killed himself.

Jaber al-Bakr was being held in a detention center in Leipzig, Germany, reports the Associated Press. The wire service quotes German news outlet Spiegel Online as reporting that al-Bakr had been under constant surveillance at the center because he was at risk for suicide.

Updated at 6:15pm ET with Wells Fargo statement.

The chairman and chief executive of Wells Fargo & Co., John Stumpf, has resigned effective immediately in the aftermath of a scandal over the bank's past practice of secretly selling services to unsuspecting customers.

Stumpf will be replaced by President and Chief Operating Officer Timothy Sloan, long considered to be Stumpf's eventual successor.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


The fight over transporting crude oil has spread across the northern U.S., with protesters disrupting pipelines that carry crude from Canada into the U.S. At least one protester has been injured and dozens have been arrested since Monday.

A large flock of sandhill cranes squawks overhead as Brenden Quinlan watches what's left of an early season snow storm roll off the massive Steens Mountain; the snow turning to sleet and then rain as it soaks the wetlands of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in remote eastern Oregon.

"It's something I find that's medicinal [to] come and hang out here," Quinlan says. "It's quiet."

I was born to a white American mother and a Syrian-Armenian father. His family is Armenian, but lived in Kessab, Syria, before immigrating to Massachusetts. But growing up, I had little contact with his family and culture, including its rich Syrian and Armenian food traditions. His own presence in my life is limited and distorted by his history of violence towards my mother.

Comic book fans are familiar with the idea of the multiverse: alternate worlds very similar to ours but different enough for plots to come and go without affecting long-term story arcs.

Well, on the Earth-3 where Hillary Clinton is running for president against a traditional, disciplined Republican – and not a Donald Trump, who has declared civil war on other Republican leaders – WikiLeaks' decision to post Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta's private emails would be a major, major news story right now.

Kratom Gets Reprieve From Drug Enforcement Administration

Oct 12, 2016

It's been a wild ride for kratom lately.

Coffee lovers, alert! A new report says that the world's coffee supply may be in danger due to climate change. In the world's biggest coffee-producing nation, Brazil, the effects of warming temperatures are already being felt in some communities.

Liberty University is a place where Donald Trump still has a lot of support.

But his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, is the one who seems naturally at home at the Virginia college, in a way the flamboyant New York real estate developer is not.

In this unlikely tale, two strangers and a drone played crucial roles in rescuing a man trapped in his flooded home in Hope Mills, N.C.

Drone photographer Quavas Hart decided to take his drone out on Sunday to capture images of some of the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Matthew.

"I happened to come across this neighborhood that was completely submerged in water," Hart tells The Two-Way. He posted a picture on Twitter showing the dramatic scene of a cul-de-sac with floodwaters up to the eaves of the roofs.

Utah has been solidly Republican at the presidential level for the past 48 years. But the leaked tape of Donald Trump bragging about groping and kissing women without their consent may have been the last straw for socially conservative voters in this heavily Mormon state.

Soon after the tape surfaced, several prominent Republicans in the state revoked their support for the GOP presidential nominee.

Gov. Gary Herbert did so on Twitter within a few hours.

America has a long and storied history with marijuana. Once grown by American colonists to make hemp rope, by 1970, it was classified as a Schedule 1 narcotic. Possession of it was — and is — a federal crime, despite the fact that in recent years 25 states have legalized medical marijuana and four states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for recreational use.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.


Here at Goats and Soda, we're trying something new: We want to know what you want us to investigate.

The first topic we'd like to hear about is girls in developing countries. Post your question to us here:

Like girls in all countries, they may face discrimination and harassment. But in low- and middle-income countries, they also may not be able to stay in school or get the health care they need.

The San Francisco Police Department disproportionately targets people of color, a review by the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services has found.

The 400-plus-page report found among other things:

-- Nine out of 11 use of deadly force incidents from 2013 to 2016 involved people of color.

-- Black drivers were "were disproportionately stopped compared to their representation in the driving population."

Today, Amazon announced the debut of an on-demand music-streaming service called Amazon Music Unlimited. With a subscription model like Spotify and Apple Music, Amazon will charge standard subscribers $10 per month; for Amazon Prime subscribers, just $8 a month; and for users of its Echo devices, only $4 a month.

Last time I worshipped in a synagogue was Sept. 5, 2014. And I won't be going today.

That might surprise my friends, who put up with my bragging ad nauseam about how Jewish I am.

When doctors want to help untangle confusing and sometimes contradictory findings in the scientific literature, they often turn to specially crafted summary studies. These are considered the gold standard for evidence. But one of the leading advocates for this practice is now raising alarm about them, because they are increasingly being tainted by commercial interests.

The murder trial of two former police officers in the shooting death of a mentally ill homeless man in Albuquerque, N.M., in 2014 has ended without verdicts.

There's a heated debate in the Arctic Circle. It's about reindeer. Lots of them.

Russian health officials want to cull a quarter million animals by Christmas, The Siberian Times reports. That's enough reindeer to fill about 400 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

The military is famous for working long hours, not only on overseas deployments to hot spots like Iraq or Afghanistan but back home, too. It's almost a badge of honor.

So balancing work and family life can be especially difficult for those in uniform. Take Air Force Maj. Johanna Ream.

She's working a high-powered, top-secret job. Her husband's an Air Force cargo plane pilot who flies all over the world. And they were the parents of an infant named Jack when this happened:

This summer, NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick began kneeling during the national anthem to protest injustice and discrimination. Since then, other athletes have followed suit.

And on Monday night, on an NBA court, another person joined in the protests Kaepernick inspired. This time, it wasn't someone listening to the anthem — it was the woman singing it.

The 93-year-old bridge in Arkansas was deemed too weak to stand.

But it turned out to be a wee bit stronger than authorities anticipated.

On Tuesday, demolition crews wired the bridge with explosives to bring it down. There were a series of booms, some puffs of black smoke, and then ... well ...

The bridge stayed put. The crowd that gathered to watch its demise was left with laughter instead of shouts of glee.

"That didn't go as planned," the highway department admitted on Twitter. It added a hashtag: #TheDayTheBridgeStoodStill.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit