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12:11 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

The Evolving Hostage Crisis In Algeria

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And another story we've been following the past couple of days: Yesterday, an extremist group in Algeria attacked a remote natural gas production complex in the Sahara Desert and seized hostages, most of them Algerian, but including some Americans and other Westerners. Today, Algeria's military responded. Reports conflict on numbers. It seems clear some hostages have escaped, others have been killed.

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The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

'Dear Abby' Dies; Pauline Phillips Was Adviser To Millions

Pauline Phillips — Dear Abby — in 2001.
Fred Prouser Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 12:52 pm

Pauline Phillips, known to millions of advice-seekers around the world as the original "Dear Abby," has died. She was 94.

The company that syndicates Dear Abby says on its website that she "died Wednesday ... in Minneapolis after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease."

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Around the Nation
12:09 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Rape: The Victims, Perpetrators And Law Enforcement

News of a horrific gang rape in India prompted protest and outrage. Similar reactions, followed allegations of gang rape by members of the Steubenville High School football team in Ohio. The extreme cases raise question about what we've learned about rapists and why so many cases go unreported.

The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Up Next For Lance Armstrong: Post-Confession Court Cases

Lance Armstrong, right, faces several court cases tied to evidence that he cheated. One of the suits was filed by his former U.S. Postal Service teammate Floyd Landis. Here, the pair ride during the 2003 Tour de France.
Paolo Cocco AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 7:14 pm

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong's confession to doping isn't just a matter of passing interest to sports fans, it has the potential to be pivotal new evidence in a raft of legal matters that have swirled around the cycling star for years.

Armstrong already has lost his battle with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, which detailed "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program" in sports when it announced a lifetime ban of the cyclist last October.

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U.S.
11:23 am
Thu January 17, 2013

A War Correspondent Takes On Her Toughest Assignment

NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro (right) conducts an interview in the West Bank.
Courtesy of Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:55 am

When I discovered I was pregnant, I realized it was time for a change of pace. I'd been covering conflicts around the world for 12 years. The plan was to retreat to balmy Miami where my family is, have my baby and just slow down for a bit.

My husband was taking time off; I would have plenty of extra help if I needed it. While pregnant, I fantasized about the tender, quiet moments I would share with my daughter, her suckling contentedly while I cooed.

"How hard could motherhood be?" I blithely thought.

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Book Reviews
11:05 am
Thu January 17, 2013

How A 'Madwoman' Upended A Literary Boys Club

This week, the National Book Critics Circle announced that two feminist literary scholars, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, would be the recipients of its 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Around the Nation
11:00 am
Thu January 17, 2013

'Grayest Generation': Older Parenthood In The U.S.

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 11:47 am

In a December article for The New Republic, "The Grayest Generation: How Older Parenthood Will Upend American Society," the magazine's science editor Judith Shulevitz points out how the growing trend toward later parenthood since 1970 coincides with a rise in neurocognitive and developmental disorders among children.

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Music
10:45 am
Thu January 17, 2013

After Big Year, Emeli Sande's 'Version Of Events'

Emeli Sande.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 8:35 pm

After huge critical and commercial success last year, breakthrough British sensation Emeli Sande has her sights set on America.

It's a long way from her roots. Born to a Zambian father and English mother, the singer-songwriter was raised in Scotland. She tells NPR's Michel Martin that being the only mixed-race family in a small village had a big impact on her.

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The Salt
10:23 am
Thu January 17, 2013

4 Tips To Help A Foodie Get Through Chemo

Some of the author's favorite foods, like yogurt, just didn't taste good during chemo.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:12 pm

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, it was clear that I would be thinking about a lot of things — myriad doctor visits, multiple tests, surgeries and chemotherapy.

Here are some things I knew about chemotherapy going in: it is unpleasant; it poisons your body; it makes you nauseated.

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The Two-Way
10:07 am
Thu January 17, 2013

'Make Me Asian' App Removed From Google Play Store

A screenshot from the "Make me Asian" app page in the Google Play store. The app is no longer available.
Google Play

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 8:10 am

"Make Me Asian," a smartphone app that drew the ire of Asian-American activists for what they say are stereotypical depictions, is no longer available on the Google Play Store.

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Shots - Health News
9:55 am
Thu January 17, 2013

After Years Of Silence, The Plague Can Rise Again

There's no doubt that the plague has staying power.

The deadly bacterium has probably been infecting people for 20,000 years. And, its genes have hardly changed since it killed nearly half of Europe's population during The Black Death.

Now microbiologists have evidence that strains of the plague may be able to reactivate themselves and trigger new outbreaks — even after lying dormant for decades.

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Inauguration 2013
9:44 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Designing Inaugural Dresses, Not All Roses

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, let's head back to events in this country. Thousands of Americans will be in Washington to watch history being made at the presidential inauguration, to hear President Obama's vision for the next four years.

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Latin America
9:44 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Mexico: New President, New Drug Violence Plan

Mexico's new president, Enrique Peña Nieto, recently enacted a law to compensate victims of drug violence. It also sets up a national registry to record the crimes. Host Michel Martin discusses the new law with Nik Steinberg of Human Rights Watch.

Politics
9:44 am
Thu January 17, 2013

President Obama's Gun Control Plan 'Extreme?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, for years, we've been telling you about the tens of thousands of people who have been killed or kidnapped by the drug cartels in Mexico, but the truth is, nobody really knew how many there were because nobody kept track. This week, the new president of Mexico signed a new law to set up a national registry of victims and to compensate the families. We'll have more on that in just a few minutes.

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Shots - Health News
9:11 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Obama's Plans For Guns Put Focus On Mental Health Of The Young

President Obama signs a series of executive orders Wednesday about the administration's gun law proposals as Vice President Biden and children who wrote letters to the White House about gun violence look on.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:32 am

If the National Rifle Association's plan to curb violence was, in part, arming school employees with guns, President Obama wants to arm them with something quite different: mental health training.

The president's plan centers largely on training teachers and others who work with children, teens and young adults to recognize mental illness as it's developing.

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The Two-Way
9:04 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Top Stories: Hostage Crisis In Algeria; Gun Debate Continues

The Salt
8:24 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Yes, Virginia, Crabs Likely Feel Pain, But They're Still Delicious

Boiling is the easiest way to dispatch a crustacean, but there are some signs that the creatures can feel pain.
iStockphoto.com

Whether crustaceans feel pain is generally something people try not to think about while munching on a crab cake or a lobster roll. Few of us would like to think that our dinner suffered during preparation, but still, we can't help but be a little curious.

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World
8:10 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Bangkok: A City Of Glitz, A City Of Desperation

From 1980 to 2011, Thailand's per capita GDP soared from $680 to nearly $5,000.
Ed Kashi/VII GlobalPost

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 8:18 am

Editor's note: Our partner GlobalPost is launching a series that looks at wealth and poverty worldwide by comparing U.S. metro areas with foreign cities that have similar levels of income inequality. The findings may surprise you.

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Economy
8:05 am
Thu January 17, 2013

In Connecticut, Two Sides Of A Deep Economic Divide

For more on this GlobalPost series, click here.
GlobalPost

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 7:21 am

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Olympics Asks Lance Armstrong To Return His Bronze Medal

Lance Armstrong at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, celebrating his bronze medal performance.
Pedro Ugarte AFP/Getty Images

As those who care wait anxiously for Part 1 of cycling superstar Lance Armstrong's confessional with Oprah Winfrey, there's word that the International Olympic Committee has asked Armstrong to return the bronze medal he won at the 2000 Olympics.

The IOC's statement says:

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The Two-Way
7:31 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Manti Te'o: Story Attributed To Parents Hard To Reconcile With Hoax Report

Manti T'eo.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 12:53 pm

If you're trying to make sense of the news that Notre Dame football star Manti Te'o now says he was the victim of a hoax and that the woman he thought was his "girlfriend" never existed and never died, you'll want to read an Oct. 12 story published by the South Bend Tribune.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Jobless Claims At Five-Year Low; Home Building Hit Five-Year High In 2012

Going up in Chicago: Row houses under construction.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 12:53 pm

There were 335,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down 37,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

That's the lowest total for any one week since January 2008.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Electric Bikes Make Auto Show Appearance

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Walk a street in Beijing and you'll likely hear a whirring noise as an electric bicycle glides past. They're common in China. One auto maker wants to make them more common here. The makers of tiny Smart cars put an electric bike on display at the Detroit Auto Show. People at that show can also find bikes with pedals, like the Toyota Prius-branded bike.

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Michigan Man Reels In Giant Goldfish

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. I have goldfish. They're small. On the other hand, my goldfish don't live in a lake, or at least one has gotten very, very big.

Fishing at Lake St. Claire, Michigan last weekend, Mark Martin reeled in a goldfish big enough to mount on his wall. Most likely dumped by a former owner, it weighed more than three pounds and is nearly 15 inches long. It might be a record catch, if Michigan kept records on goldfish.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:23 am
Thu January 17, 2013

In Algeria: Some Hostages May Have Escaped

Algerian men look at national newspapers headlining the terrorist attack and kidnapping in Amenas at a news stand in Algiers on Thursday.
Ouahab Hebbat AP

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 2:57 pm

Events are happening quickly at the gas facility in eastern Algeria where Islamist militants seized a large group of hostages — perhaps as many as 41 of them foreigners who apparently include some Americans — on Wednesday.

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Obama Calls On Congress To Act To Reduce Gun Violence

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama says he's done what he could on his own. Yesterday he signed 23 executive orders related to gun control. They will allow federal agencies to strengthen the existing background check system and improve the tracking of stolen guns. The big ticket items, like universal background checks and a ban on assault weapons and high capacity clips, will need congressional action.

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Mental Health Advocates Welcome Obama's Gun Orders

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 4:40 am

While many of the proposals President Obama unveiled Wednesday focused on toughening gun laws, they also included efforts to address the nation's fragmented and porous mental health system.

NPR Story
3:27 am
Thu January 17, 2013

FAA Grounds Boeing's New Jetliner In The U.S.

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Still more trouble for Boeing's newest passenger jet, the 787, known as the Dreamliner. The FAA has grounded all U.S.-owned 787s because of safety concerns. This follows an earlier move by Japan doing the same. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports for today's Business Bottom Line.

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Shots - Health News
1:48 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Bad Flu Season Overshadows Other Winter Miseries

People line up at a Duane Reade pharmacy in New York behind a sign announcing the recent flu outbreak.
Andrew Kelly Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Dr. Beth Zeeman says she can spot a case of influenza from 20 paces. It's not like a common cold.

"People think they've had the flu when they've had colds," Zeeman, an emergency room specialist at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, Mass., tells Shots. "People use the word 'flu' for everything. But having influenza is really a different thing. It hits you like a ton of bricks."

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Losing Our Religion
1:46 am
Thu January 17, 2013

On Religion, Some Young People Show Both Doubt And Respect

NPR's David Greene leads a discussion about religion with a group of young adults at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Washington, D.C.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

This is the second of a two-part discussion. Read Part 1.

A third of young adults in this country say they don't identify with any organized religion. NPR's David Greene wanted to understand why, so he met with a group of men and women in their 20s and 30s, all of whom have struggled with the role of faith and religion in their lives.

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