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The Salt
9:27 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Still Life With Cheeseburger: Art That Looks Good Enough To Eat

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 11:22 am

Back in the day – the 17th century – Vermeer, Rembrandt and the rest of the Dutch Golden Age crew blazed a trail for realism in art. Their work wasn't just technically dazzling; it was also distinctive. Instead of fat baby cherubs and saints, they painted the stuff of every day life. Often, that meant food.

In their hands, grapes popped with juiciness. Lobsters steamed, ready for cracking. Milk practically splashed the viewer as it poured from the jug.

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National Security
9:23 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Around The Globe, Women Already Serve In Combat Units

A female Israeli soldier runs during an urban warfare exercise at an army training facility near Zeelim, Israel, on June 19, 2008.
Ed Ou AP

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 10:55 am

Israel, Germany and Canada are among the countries that have already marched down the path the U.S. will soon follow in allowing women a role in front-line combat units.

And most experts say the integration of women into such roles elsewhere has gone smoothly, despite concerns as to whether they would be up to the physical demands and about the question of fraternization between male and female troops.

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Obama To Name New Chief Of Staff, New Counterterrorism Adviser

New White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough (left), at Friday's announcement. Behind the president: outgoing Chief of Staff Jacob "Jack" Lew, who has been nominated to be Treasury secretary.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 11:05 am

Saying he is choosing "one of my closest friends and one of my closest advisers" for the job, President Obama on Friday said that longtime aide Denis McDonough will be his next chief of staff.

During a midday event at the White House that was remarkable for the expansive comments the president made about his friend's character, his dedication and the respect he gets from those who work in the administration, Obama said McDonough has "the kind of heart that I want in the White House."

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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Whoa Canada! New Currency Has 'Wrong' Maple Leaf?

That's not the right leaf, botanists say.
Bank of Canada

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 11:05 am

A hubbub's been building up north for the past week or so about the maple leaf on Canada's new $20 bills.

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The Two-Way
8:19 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Sales Of New Homes Fell In December, But Were Up Sharply In 2012

A "sold" sign outside a home under construction last fall in Peoria, Ill.
Daniel Acker Landov

Though there was a 7.3 percent drop in sales of new homes in December from November, sales were up a healthy 8.8 percent from December 2011, the Census Bureau and Department of Housing and Urban Development report.

Homes sold at a annual rate of 369,000 last month.

Over the whole year, the agencies estimate, there were 367,000 new homes sold — up 19.9 percent from the 306,000 sold in 2011.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Really Cool Video: 'Shroud Of Cold Air Descends On The U.S.'

An image from the animated look at how cold air has spread over the nation.
NOAAVisualizations

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 8:28 am

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The Picture Show
6:33 am
Fri January 25, 2013

A Brief History Of Women In Combat

Female members of Egypt's "liberation battalions" train in the desert near Cairo for guerrilla warfare against the British in the Suez Canal zone on Nov. 20, 1951.
AP

Traditions break down fast during times of war, and history is full of examples where women assumed dramatic new roles that never would have been possible in times of peace.

As this photo gallery shows, the pressing demands of World War II led many countries to call on women to bolster their armed forces, in jobs ranging from nurse to front-line soldier.

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Spain's 'El Pais' Apologizes For Photo That Was Not Of Cancer-Stricken Chavez

That's not Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, El Pais later admitted.
Lauren Frayer

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 11:06 am

From Madrid, correspondent Lauren Frayer writes:

Editors at Spain's El País newspaper thought they had a scoop: The first glimpse in more than six weeks of cancer-stricken Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

A large, blurry photo above the fold on Thursday's front page showed a chubby-faced, bald man on an operating table surrounded by doctors, with a breathing tube in his mouth. A caption identified the ailing patient as Chavez, who is undergoing cancer treatment in Cuba.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Top Stories: Snow And Ice Spread; Senate Tweaks Filibuster Rules

There was plenty to shovel early Friday in Durham, Pa. More winter weather is on the way for much of the nation.
Owen Humphreys PA Photos /Landov

Good morning.

The stories making headlines today include:

-- " 'March For Life' Rally Expected To Draw Huge Crowd In Washington." (Our first post of the day.)

-- "Snow, Ice Target Midwest, East." (The Weather Channel)

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Space
5:49 am
Fri January 25, 2013

NASA Needs Your Help To Feed The Astronauts

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Not long ago on this program, we reported that food expiration dates are often meaningless. Let's take that concept into space. Researchers from the University of Hawaii and Cornell University are asking you to send them long-lasting recipes. They want to help NASA determine an extremely durable menu to keep astronauts fed, should the agency send people on a four-month journey to Mars. I got just one word for you, NASA: Cheetos. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Super Bowl Forces Nancy Pelosi To Pick A Team

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi recently had to make one of the toughest decisions of her political career: Who to root for in the Super Bowl, the Baltimore Ravens or the San Francisco 49ers. Pelosi was born in Baltimore. Her late father was the mayor there. But she represents San Franciscans in Congress and her kids grew up with the 49ers. So Pelosi says she's rooting for San Francisco but not against Baltimore.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:21 am
Fri January 25, 2013

'March For Life' Rally Draws Large Crowd In Washington

An anti-abortion activist at the March for Life rally Friday in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 5:54 pm

Organizers say today's March for Life rally in the nation's capital may bring more anti-abortion activists to the streets than last year's estimated 400,000. By midday, a large crowd was gathered in the National Mall, listening to speeches from former GOP presidential contender Rick Santorum and others and preparing to march toward the Capitol and the Supreme Court.

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NPR Story
2:38 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Senate Changes Filibuster Rules

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When and if the U.S. Senate is ready to confirm Mary Jo White to head the SEC, she may find her path somewhat smoother - thanks to a rule change the Senate agreed to last night. The new Senate rule makes it just a little bit harder to block nominations, and a little easier to reach resolution than it was for President Obama's nominees in his first term. It's part of a subtle revision of the most potent weapon of the minority party: the filibuster. Here's NPR's David Welna.

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NPR Story
2:38 am
Fri January 25, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In today's last word in business is: censored, not stirred.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SKYFALL")

DANIEL CRAIG: (as James Bond) Bond, James Bond.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The new Bond film "Skyfall" is now playing in the world's second-largest movie market - that would be China - and some 007 fans are furious about the nips and tucks Chinese censors have made to the movie.

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NPR Story
2:38 am
Fri January 25, 2013

'Fruitvale' Stands Out At Sundance

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Snow, superstars, and cinema. That combination can mean only one thing at this time of year: The Sundance Film Festival. Our movie reviewer, Kenneth Turan, is on the scene in Park City, Utah, as he is every year, to tell us about some of the movies at Sundance. Good morning.

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: Let's start with dramas. What really stands out for you, Ken?

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It's All Politics
12:49 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Sponsors Of Assault Weapons Ban Hope Newtown Shooting Changes Minds

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks at a news conference Thursday announcing her plan to introduce a bill to ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Congressional Democrats appeared on Capitol Hill Thursday to push for a new ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.

The bill's author, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, started her remarks with a roster of tragedy: "Columbine. Virginia Tech. Aurora. Tucson. Oak Creek. The common thread in these shootings is each gunman used a semiautomatic assault weapon or large-capacity ammunition magazine."

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Planet Money
12:48 am
Fri January 25, 2013

At $17.5 Million A Year, LeBron James Is Underpaid

A bargain at $17.5 million a year.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 10:29 am

LeBron James is arguably the best player in the NBA. His salary is $17.5 million a year. He's worth much, much more.

"He's getting hosed," says Kevin Grier, an economist from the University of Oklahoma.

James used to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers. When he left, the value of the team fell by tens of millions of dollars — and the value of his new team, the Miami Heat, rose by tens of millions. The economists I talked to said James should be making closer to $40 million a year.

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Movies
12:46 am
Fri January 25, 2013

For Would-Be Sundancers, Kickstarter Can Fuel Films

A scene from 99% — The Occupy Wall Street Collaborative Film, a Sundance documentary that raised more than $23,000 on Kickstarter.
Ari Ress Sundance Film Festival

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

If you want to make a movie, you generally need a lot of money. And filmmakers have to be creative about raising it.

Just ask the filmmakers at the Sundance Film Festival, taking place this week in Park City, Utah. Some 10 percent of the films selected for this year's iteration of the prestigious festival raised money through the crowd-funding website Kickstarter.

In the three years since the website launched, Kickstarter-funded films have been nominated for Oscars, picked up by Showtime and HBO, and honored with awards at Sundance, South By Southwest and Cannes.

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Television
12:46 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Lives Of Praise, Lives In Progress On 'The Sisterhood'

The new TLC show The Sisterhood follows the lives of five preachers' wives in Atlanta.
TLC

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

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U.S.
12:44 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Foreign Investors Trade Dollars For U.S. Residency

This Marriott hotel in Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood was rebuilt by American Life Inc. using EB-5 visa investment money. The project helped dozens of well-to-do people obtain permanent green cards.
Jennifer Wing for NPR

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Svetlana Anikeeva was 15 in the early '90s when she visited America as an exchange student.

"And it was completely different place in every imaginable aspect," she recalls.

Anikeeva grew up in Vladivostok on the eastern edge of Russia, and studied abroad in Savannah, Ga., where the experience, she says, changed her life.

"The people were different. The culture was different. The weather, the food, the school. Everything was fascinating," she says. "I knew that I wanted to come here."

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StoryCorps
8:03 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

After Years Of Estrangement, Eight Siblings Become A Family

Bryan Wilmoth (right) reunited with his brother Michael years after their parents kicked Bryan out for being gay. All six of their siblings either ran away or were kicked out of their family's home over the years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

When Bryan Wilmoth was in his late teens, his father found a love letter from a man in Bryan's box of things.

Furious at the discovery of a gay son, Bryan's father took him for a ride and dropped him off in the middle of the night with a $5 bill.

"That's sort of all I remember — sleeping outside in the country that night," Bryan, 50, recounts to his brother Michael, at StoryCorps in Los Angeles.

Growing up in a strict, religious household, Bryan and his seven younger siblings all became estranged from their parents over the years.

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The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

New Zealand Environmentalist Wants To Eliminate Cats To Save Birds

Here Kitty: New Zealand cricketer Kane Williamson looks on as a cat walks on the outfield during a test match between Sri Lanka and New Zealand.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:22 am

Gareth Morgan hasn't said he's a dog person, but he's definitely not a cat person. Morgan, a top New Zealand economist and environmentalist, is campaigning for a cat-free country.

In an interview with The New York Times, Morgan said "cats are a 'friendly neighborhood serial killer' of birds."

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The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Manti Te'o: 'What I Went Through Was Real'

Manti T'eo.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:16 am

In his first TV interview, Manti Te'o told Katie Couric Thursday that what he "went through was real."

The Notre Dame linebacker, whose athleticism and tragic personal story buoyed him to stardom, has been in the spotlight ever since DeadSpin revealed part of that amazing story wasn't real.

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Monkey See
3:44 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Home Video Review: 'Buster Keaton: The Ultimate Collection'

Buster Keaton, aka "The Great Stone Face," brought side-splitting comedy to the silent-screen era. Here, he's pictured in 1924's The Navigator.
Kino Lorber

Time now for a home-viewing recommendation from NPR movie critic Bob Mondello. A quiet recommendation — because Bob is touting the Ultimate Buster Keaton Collection, a 14-disc set of classic silent comedies.

Silent film had three great clowns. Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp is the one everyone remembers; all-American daredevil Harold Lloyd is the one who made the most money; and Buster Keaton was the genius.

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It's All Politics
3:26 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Senate Filibuster Changes: More Evolution Than Revolution

Actor Jimmy Stewart in a scene from the 1939 movie Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, which popularized the notion of a "talking filibuster." Even under changes negotiated in the Senate, the talking filibuster remains a thing of the past.
AP

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 7:28 pm

Update at 9:25 ET Senate OKs Filibuster Deal

The Senate voted Thursday to limit filibusters in a rare bipartisan vote that would reduce but not end the number of times opponents can use the procedure.

Here's more from The Associated Press:

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Music Reviews
3:06 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Two Decades On, Vusi Mahlasela Still Sings 'To The People'

Vusi Mahlasela's new album, a live recording of his 20th-anniversary show in Johannesburg, is titled Sing to the People.
Erik Forster Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 5:36 pm

South African singer-songwriter Vusi Mahlasela came of age during the 1970s, an era dominated by the violent student uprising in Soweto. From the start, his musical expression has been about love and hope for his country. His songs play as anthems of South Africa's rise from apartheid to democracy and have helped earn him the nickname "The Voice."

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The Two-Way
2:54 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

American Sentenced To 35 Years For Role In Mumbai Attack

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 3:08 pm

David Coleman Headley, whose scouting missions were central to the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai, was sentenced to 35 years in prison today.

According to the AP, one American woman injured during the attacks that killed 160 people testified that because of Coleman, she knew the "sound of life leaving a 13-year-old child."

"I don't have any faith in Mr. Headley when he says he's a changed person and believes in the American way of life," US District Judge Harry Leinenweber said before handing down the sentence.

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Energy
2:54 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Will Obama Administration Clear Keystone XL Pipeline?

TransCanada already has begun construction on a southern section of the Keystone XL pipeline. Since it doesn't cross the U.S.-Canadian border, it doesn't require approval from the State Department and President Obama.
Sarah A. Miller AP

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 3:06 pm

The future of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline is in the hands of the State Department. President Obama rejected a similar pipeline proposal last year, but now that Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman has approved an alternative route through his state, the approval process is back on track.

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It's All Politics
2:32 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

At Winter Gathering, GOP Asks: Where Do We Go From Here?

Reince Priebus, shown at the Republican National Convention in August, says Republicans need to "grow our party without compromising our principles."
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 3:22 pm

Some soul-searching is on the agenda as the Republican National Committee holds its winter meetings in Charlotte, N.C.

November's elections were a big disappointment for the GOP. The party has now lost the popular vote in five of the past six presidential elections.

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All Tech Considered
2:31 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Swinging From 140 Characters To Six-Second Videos, Twitter Launches Vine

Twitter announced its partnership with Vine, a video-sharing app that posts six-second videos onto a tweet, on Thursday, Jan. 24.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 9:02 am

If you thought 140 characters of text was too short, try grabbing your Twitter followers' attention with six-second videos. Six seconds.

Twitter on Thursday launched the video app Vine, which allows users to shoot brief videos and directly tweet them. The social media company acquired the video-sharing startup last fall, according to All Things D.

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