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8:03 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Relentless, Despite Losses: Congressman's Climb To The Hill

U.S. Rep. James Clyburn explains the hope he carries along with him in his career to his granddaughter Sydney Reed.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 11:09 am

It took years for Democratic Rep. James Clyburn of South Carolina to become who he is today: the highest-ranking African-American in Congress.

And those years included many failures. During a visit to StoryCorps, his granddaughter Sydney Reed, who was 10 at the time of the recording, asks Clyburn a personal question: "Have you ever felt you wanted to quit?"

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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Explosion Hits State Oil Company Building In Mexico City

Firefighters belonging to the Tacubaya sector and workers dig for survivors after an explosion at a building adjacent to the executive tower of Mexico's state-owned oil company PEMEX.
Guillermo Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 8:07 pm

What appears to be a significant explosion has rocked the Pemex tower in Mexico City. Television images are showing smoke billowing from the glass high rise in the Mexican capital.

Pemex, the state-owned oil company, tweeted that an explosion happened in a building that is part of the oil giant's headquarters. According to the company and the country's interior minister, 14 people are dead and 80 are injured.

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Shots - Health News
4:21 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Salmonella Undermines Hedgehogs' Cuteness Overload

We have no reason to think this little guy isn't clean as a whistle, but some hedgehogs carry salmonella.
Flickr

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 2:19 pm

Salmonella is one of the most common illnesses people get from food. Undercooked ground beef is risky. And some of the biggest recalls ever involved eggs potentially contaminated by the bacteria.

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Latin America
3:59 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

The Mexico-Canada Guest Worker Program: A Model For The U.S.?

Armando Tenorio at his home in Mexico last December. Tenorio spends most of the year working on a blueberry farm in Canada, on a temporary work permit, to support his family in Mexico.
Dominic Bracco II The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 11:29 am

In the U.S., farmers and farm workers alike say the current system to import temporary workers, especially in agriculture, is slow and fraught with abuses.

But the shape of a new guest-worker program is still being hashed out. Some say the U.S. should import temporary workers the same way Canada does. For nearly four decades, the governments of Canada and Mexico have cooperated to fill agriculture jobs that Canadian citizens won't do, and that Mexicans are clamoring to get.

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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Texas District Attorney Shot, Killed In Front Of Courthouse

An assistant district attorney in North Texas was shot and killed as he arrived at the courthouse where he worked on Thursday.

The Associated Press reports:

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Law
3:50 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

'Check Yes Or No': The Hurdles Of Employment With Criminal Past

For Americans with criminal records, it can be tough to land job interviews — especially when employers bar them from applying.
CYH iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:55 pm

Melissa spent months looking for a job — any job. For days, the 25-year-old consistently visited her welfare-to-work program in downtown Brooklyn, resume in hand and an interview smile splashed across her face.

"Every day, Monday through Friday, 9 to 4," she explains. "That's dedication."

Melissa, who asked us to not reveal her last name, has plenty of job experience. She's a self-identified "people person" and says she aces every interview. But there's just one thing holding her back: the past.

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Latin America
3:31 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

As U.S. Consumes Less Cocaine, Brazil Uses More

Brazilian federal police patrol the Mamore River, which separates Brazil from Bolivia. The river is used by traffickers to ferry cocaine from Bolivia into Brazil, where cocaine consumption is rising rapidly.
Juan Forero Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:55 pm

As cocaine consumption falls in the United States, South American drug traffickers have begun to pioneer a new soft target for their product: big and increasingly affluent Brazil.

And the source of the cocaine is increasingly Bolivia, a landlocked country that shares a 2,100-mile border with Brazil.

As Brazilian police officers and border agents can attest, the drug often finds its way to Brazil by crossing the Mamore River, which separates the state of Rondonia from Bolivia in the heart of South America.

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

South L.A. Teens Doubt New Laws Will Change Gun Culture

Handguns collected in South-Central Los Angeles as part of a Gun for Gift Card exchange in 2009. One teenager here says getting a gun on the streets is just "one phone call away."
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 11:04 am

On 53rd Street and Vermont Avenue in South Los Angeles, violent members of at least six gangs run the streets. A landmark church is boarded up and tagged. There are liquor stores and abandoned lots. On Tuesday night, there was a drive-by shooting two blocks away, and folks are expecting retaliation. This is an area where murders, robberies and rapes are common — and so are guns.

"There's too many guns out there," says Randolph Wright, 18. "I can tell you right now, every hood has an AK[-47]. Regardless of whatever other gun they got, they have an AK."

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Art & Design
3:01 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Graffiti Gnomes Allowed To Roam On Oakland Utility Poles

An anonymous artist started placing the hand-painted gnomes on the bases of utility poles all over Oakland.
Courtesy of the photographer

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:55 pm

Over the past year, small gnomes started springing up all around Oakland, Calif. The elfin creatures are hand-painted on wooden boards; each is about 6 inches tall, with red hat, brown boots and white beard. They're bits of urban folk art from an anonymous painter who surreptitiously screws them onto the base of utility poles.

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Music Interviews
2:32 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Ron Sexsmith: At Midlife, A Songwriter Ponders Mortality

Ron Sexsmith's new album, Forever Endeavour, comes out Feb. 5.
Michael D'Amico Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:55 pm

Somehow, Canadian singer-songwriter Ron Sexsmith makes a case of the deep blues sound sweet. The new album Forever Endeavour is his 13th, and the songs show him, at midlife, reflecting a lot on the passage of time.

"I think there's always something comforting about sad songs," Sexsmith says. "It's a shared thing that everyone can relate to."

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Beyoncé On Lip-Syncing: 'I Did Not Feel Comfortable Taking A Risk'

Pat Benic DPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 3:34 pm

The Grammy-award winning singer Beyoncé has finally put an end to all the talk surrounding her performance during President Obama's second inauguration.

And she did it in diva fashion, during a press conference to preview her Super Bowl performance.

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You Must Read This
1:45 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

War Writ Small: Of Pushcarts And Peashooters

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:55 pm

Adam Mansbach is the author of the forthcoming novel Rage is Back.

Stealing my 9-year-old nephew's copy of The Pushcart War by Jean Merrill was the best thing I did last summer. I was his age the first time I read it, and twice his age the last time I went back to it. I'm twice that old again now, but as soon as I dove into this intimate, majestic tale of war writ small — of a battle between the pushcart peddlers and the truckers of New York City — I realized how timeless, and how deeply a part of me, the story was.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

How Owls Spin Their Heads Without Tearing Arteries

How does a great gray owl do that? Now we know.
Martin Meissner AP

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 5:56 am

The human neck is a delicate stem. Torque it a bit too much, and the carotid and vertebral arteries can rip, causing deadly strokes. People have torn their neck arteries riding roller coasters, doing yoga, going to the chiropractor, being rear-ended in the car – even leaning back for a beauty-parlor shampoo.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Reports: Shots Fired At Atlanta Middle School

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 3:59 pm

Shots were fired at an Atlanta middle school, this afternoon, several news outlets are reporting. The Associated Press quotes an Atlanta fire official saying that a 14-year-old had been shot at Price Middle School.

WSBTV reports that one teacher was injured and the condition of the teen is not known.

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All Tech Considered
1:18 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

What's Next, A Patent For The Lines Around Apple Stores?

Apple has trademarked its minimalist store design.
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Officially as of last week, there's nothing quite like Apple's stores. After an array of patents of its products, Apple has decided to go whole hog and trademark its minimalist store design. The trademark was approved by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Jan. 22, Reuters reported.

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Sports
12:31 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Are Shooting Ranges The New Bowling Alleys?

Renee Blaine, a leader of the Leander, Texas, chapter of A Girl and A Gun during the "Girls Night Out" event.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 8:33 am

The traditional American shooting range is extending its range.

In Summerville, S.C., for example, the ATP Gunshop & Range stages community-minded blood drives and Toys for Tots collections. Twice a week there are ladies' nights, where women can learn to fire pistols and receive free T-shirts.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Caleb Moore, Freestyle Snowmobile Rider, Dies After X Games Crash

Snomobiler Caleb Moore smiles during a Winter X Games news conference in Aspen.
Eric Lars Bakke AP

Caleb Moore, a freestyle snowmobile rider, who suffered a spectacular crash during last week's Winter X Games in Aspen, died today because of his injuries, his family said.

Moore was 25.

Here's how ESPN, which hosts the X Games, describes the incident:

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NPR Story
12:05 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

'Distant Witness': Social Media's 'Journalism Revolution'

A shop in Tahrir Square is spray-painted with the word "twitter" after the government shut off Internet access in February 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:22 pm

When protests in Tunisia inspired a wave of revolutions known as the Arab Spring, Andy Carvin tracked the events in real time from thousands of miles away in Washington, D.C.

From the tear gas in Egypt's Tahrir Square, to the liberation of Libya, Carvin, NPR's senior strategist, used social media to gather and report the news.

In his book Distant Witness: Social Media, the Arab Spring and a Journalism Revolution, Carvin explains how he cultivated social media sources into a new form of journalism where civilians on the ground controlled the news.

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Middle East
11:58 am
Thu January 31, 2013

After Benghazi Attack, Improving American Security Abroad

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 12:35 pm

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) told Fox News that Secretary of State Hilary Clinton "got away with murder" for her handling of the attacks on the U.S. consulate in Libya. Ambassador Thomas Pickering, who led the independent investigation into the attacks, talks about the future of diplomatic security.

National Security
11:58 am
Thu January 31, 2013

What 'The New York Times' Hack Tells Us About China

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 12:27 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

According to The New York Times' own investigation, Chinese hackers have been attacking the newspapers' computer system for the last four months. Infiltration happened as The Times broke a story on the vast wealth accumulated by the family of the Chinese prime minister. Officials warned The Times the story would have consequences. But hacking is not anything new in China, and they're definitely not the only country doing it today. We'll look at what China's after, who they're targeting, how they do it and why.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Has Obama Done Some Skeet Shooting? Fox News Says Yes

Julian Finney Getty Images

The Washington Post's Fact Checker takes on the subject of whether President Obama was shooting straight when he told The New Republic that he has fired a gun and that "we do skeet shooting all the time" at Camp David.

And what does Fact Checker conclude?

"Verdict Pending."

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Portugal's Monster: The Mechanics Of A Massive Wave

American surfer Garrett "GMAC" McNamara rides what could be, if confirmed, the biggest wave conquered in history as a crowd watches Monday in Nazare, Portugal.
To Mane Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 9:07 am

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Thu January 31, 2013

After Anti-Gay Comments, 49ers Chris Culliver Says 'I Have Gay Relatives'

Chris Culliver of the San Francisco 49ers addresses the media at the New Orleans Marriott on Thursday.
Scott Halleran Getty Images

A Media Day interview has turned into a maelstrom for Super-Bowl-bound Chris Culliver, the San Francisco 49ers cornerback.

Wednesday, during a short interview with radio host Artie Lange, Culliver was asked if there were any gay players on his team.

"Nah," he answered. "We ain't got no gay people on the team. They gotta get up outta here if they do. Can't be with that sweet stuff. Nah, can't be in the locker room."

Lange went on to ask if players should stay in the closet.

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The Two-Way
10:57 am
Thu January 31, 2013

U.S. Moves To Halt AB InBev's Purchase Of Grupo Modelo

A $20.1 billion merger of beer conglomerates is now delayed, after the U.S. Justice Department sued to stop Anheuser-Busch InBev's acquisition of Mexico's dominant brewer, Grupo Modelo, Thursday. The agency's antitrust division says the two corporations haven't done enough to protect consumers.

The deal would put Corona, Bud Light, Stella Artois, and other popular beers under the same corporate umbrella, ending the competition that Justice officials say has resulted in lower prices. The Mexican government approved the merger last November.

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It's All Politics
10:50 am
Thu January 31, 2013

For Asian-Americans, Immigration Backlogs Are A Major Hurdle

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 11:40 am

Although the national conversation about immigration policy tends to focus on Latinos, it is Asian-Americans who encounter some of the knottiest challenges facing immigrants and immigration reformers.

Of the five countries with the longest backlogs for visas, four are in Asia.

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Shots - Health News
10:43 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Should Medicare Pay For Alzheimer's Scans?

The loss of contrast between gray and white matter in this brain scan indicates a high uptake of Amyvid and the presence of amyloid plaques.
Eli Lilly & Co. and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 2:18 pm

Though increasingly common, Alzheimer's disease still isn't all that easy to diagnose, especially in its early stages.

Forgetfulness and other signs of dementia can be caused by lots of things other than Alzheimer's. Sometimes the symptoms are fleeting or normal in the context of a person's age. But at other times these symptoms mark the dark path of Alzheimer's.

Doctors' standard approach to diagnosis includes taking a medical history of the patient, assessing mental function and administering various neurological and lab tests.

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Africa
10:23 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Soccer: A Surprising Player In Egypt's Unrest

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 3:02 pm

Violent protests are breaking out in Egypt, just two years after a massive uprising led to the fall of the former dictator. One of the unexpected driving forces is soccer. Host Michel Martin talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor at The Nation about how the sport affects Egypt's political landscape.

The Salt
10:19 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Oh, Baby: Squeezable Snacks Might Be Tough On The Teeth

Squeeze me with caution.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 12:15 pm

Those squeeze pouches full of organic pureed food in clever combos like plum, berry and barley have become a lifesaver for busy parents.

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Citing Progress, White House Disbands Jobs Council

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 10:43 am

The White House said today that it would not extend the term of its jobs council, a group of high-profile executives tapped for advice on how to improve the country's jobs situation.

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The Two-Way
10:07 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Dear Lawyers: Order In The &*%# Court!

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 11:33 am

Remember the scene in the 1979 movie ... And Justice For All where Al Pacino, who is playing an attorney, loses it in court?

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